Researchers

Professor John Brocklesby

John teaches organisation theory at Victoria University of Wellington. He has published extensively in international scholarly journals on systems theory and the use of multiple methodologies in operations research. He serves as reviewer or editorial board-member for several leading international journals.

Associate Professor Jane Bryson

Jane is Director of the Post graduate Diploma in Human Resource Management at Victoria University of Wellington. She worked as an organisational psychologist and as a Human Resources Manager before joining academia. Her research interests and output focus on HRM and organisations, in particular the management of professionals.

Professor Colin Campbell-Hunt

Colin is a specialist in strategic management, which he taught at Victoria University of Wellington until taking up a chair of Management at Otago University in 2002. He has co-authored two major studies of business response to deregulation in New Zealand: Islands of Excellence? and A Season of Excellence? His research includes studies of generic competitive strategy and the sources of sustainable competitive advantage. He has been a national council member of the New Zealand Strategic Management Society, a Fellow of the New Zealand College of Management, representative for New Zealand on the APEC business management network, and a Visiting Professor of Management at St Andrews University in Scotland. Colin Campbell-Hunt is co-leader of the CANZ project.

Professor Sylvie Chetty

Sylvie teaches marketing at Massey Albany. She has been researching the internationalisation of New Zealand firms for the past ten years, and has published on the export performance of New Zealand firms, their use of business networks in internationalising, learning in the internationalisation process and pre-export behaviour.

Professor Lawrence Corbett

Lawrie teaches operations management at Victoria University of Wellington. He has led a 10-year study of manufacturing strategy in New Zealand as part of the Global Manufacturing Futures Survey, and was involved in the Leading the Way study (1994) of leading Australian and New Zealand manufacturers. He has co-authored a major 1996 study of business response to deregulation in New Zealand: A Season of Excellence? He has been an assessor for the New Zealand Best Factory Award, Wellington branch committee member for the New Zealand Production and Inventory Control Society, member of the Wellington Quality Improvement Network, and National Evaluator for the New Zealand Business Excellence Foundation. Lawrence Corbett is co-leader of the CANZ project.

Professor Urs Daellenbach

Urs is a specialist in strategic management. Prior to joining Victoria University of Wellington in 1998, he taught at Purdue University, Indiana and the University of Calgary. His research interests include the development and evolution of competitive strategies, the sustainability of competitive advantages, and corporate governance factors that facilitate and inhibit organisation-wide and divisional performance outcomes. Current projects address the factors contributing to rapid growth trajectories, the use of strategic controls in R&D settings, the development of integrative capability, and the formation and maintenance of corporate reputation.

Professor Sally Davenport

Sally is a leading researcher of science and technology management in New Zealand. She has published extensively on the management of the new science-based organisations emerging from the reforms of the mid 1980s, and on science and technology policy. Her work has also included several case studies of strategic development in technology-intensive enterprises. She has worked as a consultant to the Government science bodies, FRST and MoRST, and with industry bodies, in the development of research strategies for the forestry industry.

Associate Professor Deborah Jones

Deborah is a Senior Lecturer in Organisational Behaviour at Victoria University of Wellington. She is interested in the connections between identity and culture at work. Current field research focuses on the ways that people think about identity issues such as competency, national culture and age in New Zealand workplaces. Some specific projects she has been involved in previously include studies of workplace communication, biculturalism, gender issues, and the aftermath of major organisational downsizing in major New Zealand organisations.