Dr Todd Bridgman

Courses

Teaching in 2018

Research interests

Organisational Change, Organisational Culture, Organisational Politics, Management education,

Introduction

Todd Bridgman completed his PhD in organisational studies at the University of Cambridge and held research fellowships at Judge Business School and Wolfson College, University of Cambridge.

Todd’s research and teaching is located within Critical Management Studies (CMS), which focuses on 'management’ as a pervasive institution within capitalist economic formations. Its concern is with the study of, and sometimes against, management rather than with the development of techniques or legitimations for management.

The focus of Todd’s research is critical historical perspectives on management education, which involves writing alternative histories of the past as a way of rethinking how management is taught to students today and how it might evolve in the future. He is currently Co-Editor-in-Chief of Management Learning.

Todd also has an interest in producing animated videos of his research as a means of increasing impact and stakeholder engagement. He has developed a New History of Management youtube channel with Stephen Cummings. The latest video "Who Built Maslow's Pyramid?" is highlighted below.

Qualifications

PhD (University of Cambridge)
MCom (Hons) University of Auckland
BCOM/BA University of Auckland
Certificate in Journalism (Auckland Institute of Technology)

Research interests

  • Management education
  • Management history
  • Critical Management Studies

Publications and presentations

Books

Cummings, S., Bridgman, T., Hassard, J., & Rowlinson, M. (2017) A new history of management. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Alvesson, M., Bridgman, T. & Willmott, H. (eds.). (2009) The Oxford Handbook of Critical Management Studies. Oxford University Press.

Journal articles

McLaughlin, C. & Bridgman, T. (2017). The battle for ‘Middle-Earth’: The constitution of interests and identifies in the Hobbit dispute. Journal of Industrial Relations. DOI: 10.1177/0022185617714293

Bridgman, T. & De’Ath, A. (2017). Early career development in the public sector: Lessons from a social constructionist perspective. Australian Journal of Career Development, 26(2): 43-51.

Weenink, E., & Bridgman, T. (2017). Taking subjectivity and reflexivity seriously: Implications of social constructionism for researching volunteer motivation. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 28(1): 90-109.

Bridgman, T., Cummings, S., & McLaughlin, C. (2016). Re-stating the case: How revisiting the development of the case method can help us think differently about the future of the business school. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 15(4): 724-741.

Bridgman, T., & Bell, E. (2016). Seeing and being seen as a management learning and education scholar: Rejoinder to ‘Identifying Research Topic Development in Business and Management Education Research Using Legitimation Code Theory’. Journal of Management Education, 40(6): 692-699.

Cummings, S. & Bridgman, T. (2016) The Limits and possibilities of history: How a wider, deeper and more engaged understanding of business history can foster innovative thinking. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 15(2): 250-267.

Cummings, S. & Bridgman, T & Brown, K. (2016) Unfreezing change as three steps: Rethinking Kurt Lewin’s legacy for change management. Human Relations, 69(1): 33-60.

Walker, B. & Bridgman, T. (2013). Organisational identity and alcohol use among young employees: A case study of a professional services firm.  International Journal of Drug Policy, 24, 597-604.

Cummings, S. & Bridgman, T. (2011). The relevant past: Why the history of management should be critical for our future.  Academy of Management Learning and Education, 10 (1), 77.93.

Bridgman, T. (2010). Beyond the Manager’s Moral Dilemma: Rethinking the ‘Ideal Type’ Business Ethics Case, Journal of Business Ethics, 94, 311-322.

Bridgman, T. (2010). Empty talk?  University voices on the Global Financial Crisis, Policy Quarterly, 6(4), 40-45.

McKenna, S., Garcia-Lorenzo, L. & Bridgman T. (2010). Managing, managerial control and managerial identity in the post-bureaucratic world. Journal of Management Development, 29(2), 128-136.

Bridgman, T. (2008). Institutionalizing critique: A Problem of Critical Management Studies. Ephemera, 8(2), 157-175.

Bridgman, T. (2007). Freedom and autonomy in the university enterprise.  Journal of Organizational Change Management, 20 (4), 478-490.

Bridgman, T. (2007). Reconstituting Relevance: Exploring Possibilities for Management Educators' Critical Engagement with the Public. Management Learning. 38, 425-439.

Bridgman, T. (2007).  Assassins in Academia?  New Zealand Academics as Critic and Conscience of Society. New Zealand Sociology. 22 (1), 126-144.

Bridgman, T. & Willmott, H. (2006). Institutions and Technology: Frameworks for Understanding Organizational Change–The Case of a Major ICT Outsourcing Contract.  Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 42 (1), 110-126.

Book chapters

Sundstedt, C., Bridgman, T. & Tyson, J. (forthcoming). Revealing the ‘real Julia’. Authenticity and gender in Australian political leadership. The Dark Side 3: Critical Cases on the Downside of Business. Greenleaf Publishing.

McLaughlin, C. & Bridgman, T. (forthcoming). Apple and the true costs of production. The Dark Side 3: Critical Cases on the Downside of Business. Greenleaf Publishing.

Bridgman, T. (2013) The dark side of light-handed regulation: Mercury Energy and the death of Folole Muliaga.  In P. Fatien Diochon, E. Raufflet and A.J Mills (eds) The Dark Side 2: Critical Cases on the Downside of Business.  Greenleaf Publishing, pp. 42-56.

Bridgman, T & McLaughlin, C. (2013). ‘The battle for Middle Earth: New Zealand’s bid to save The Hobbit’.  In P. Fatien Diochon, E. Raufflet and A.J Mills (eds) The Dark Side 2: Critical Cases on the Downside of Business.  Greenleaf Publishing, pp. 127-135

Alvesson, M., Bridgman, T. & Willmott, H. (2009). Introduction in M. Alvesson, T. Bridgman and H. Willmott (eds). The Oxford Handbook of Critical Management Studies. Oxford University Press.

Bridgman, T. (2009). No smoke without fire? Corporate social responsibility and the ethics of university-industry partnerships.  In C. Garsten & T. Hernes (eds). Ethical Dilemmas in Management. London: Routledge.  pp. 117-131.

Bridgman, T. & Willmott, H. (2007).  Academics in the ‘knowledge economy’: From expert to intellectual? In C. Burtscher, A. Harding, S. Laske, & A. Scott (eds). Bright Satanic Mills: Universities, regional development and the knowledge economy. Aldershot, Hants: Ashgate.  pp.149-160.

Written cases with instructional material

Sundstedt, C., Bridgman, T., and Tyson, J., (2016) Revealing the ‘real Julia’: Authenticity and gender In Australian political leadership. Australia and New Zealand School of Government Case Program. Reference 2016-185.1.

Berry, R & Bridgman, T. (2013).  Trimming the FAT: Change at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.  Australia and New Zealand School of Government Case Program, Reference 2013-142.1

Bridgman, T. (2011).  Treading the thin blue line: embedding culture change at New Zealand Police.  Australia and New Zealand School of Government Case Program, Reference 2011-639.1

Bridgman, T. (2011).  A question of style: the leadership of Christine Rankin. Australia and New Zealand School of Government Case Program, Reference 2011-129.1, 2011-129.2

Bridgman, T. (2009).  Corporate social responsibility: Mercury Energy and its low-income electricity consumers. Australia and New Zealand School of Government Case Program, Reference 2009-74.1, 2009-74.1.

Bridgman, T. (2008).  Leading culture change at New Zealand Police. (Part A, Part B and Teaching Note), Australia and New Zealand School of Government Case Program, References 2008-82.1, 2008-82.2, 2008-82.3.

Awards and prizes

  • 2016: Academy of Management Learning & Education Best Paper Award (with Stephen Cummings and Colm McLaughlin)
  • 2016: Human Relations Paper of the Year Award (with Stephen Cummings and Kenneth Brown)
  • 2015: Winner (with Stephen Cummings and Colm McLaughlin), Best Critical Management Education Paper,   Critical Management Studies Division of the Academy of Management, (Vancouver, 7-11 August, 2015).
  • 2013: Winner (with Colm McLaughlin), 2013 Darkside Case Competition, Academy of Management Annual     Meeting, Orlando, 9-13 August, 2013 for ‘Apple and the Human Costs of Production’
  • 2012: Finalist (with Stephen Cummings), Academy of Management Learning Education Best Paper Award     2011 for “The relevant past: Why the history of management should be critical for our future”
  • 2009: Winner,2009 Darkside Case Competition, Critical Management Studies Division of the Academy of Management, (Chicago, 7-11 August, 2009).
  • 2008: Early Career Research Award, Victoria University of Wellington.
  • Best Paper, Critical Management Studies Interest Group of the Academy of Management, (Anaheim, 8-13 August, 2008) (with S. Cummings).
  • 2007: Best Paper, Civic University Stream, 5th International Critical Management Studies Conference, (Manchester Business School, 11-13 July, 2007).
  • 2006: Outstanding Doctoral Research Award, Organizational Change and Development, Emerald Publishing Group/ European Foundation for Management Development.
  • 2004: Best Doctoral Dissertation, Critical Management Studies Interest Group of the Academy of Management.
  • Courses

    Teaching in 2018