Readying the Wakas: New Zealand’s Response to Climate Change-Induced Displacement in the Pacific

What does climate-induced displacement mean for the Pacific region, and how should New Zealand respond? A panel of experts explores the scale of the challenge.

Readying the Wakas: New Zealand’s Response to Climate Change-Induced Displacement in the Pacific

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Event type: Seminars

16 October 2018 from 12.30 pm - 2.00 pm 16th Oct 2018 12:30pm 16th Oct 2018 2:00pm

Rutherford House Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

What does climate-induced displacement mean for the Pacific region, and how should New Zealand respond? Oxfam New Zealand and the IGPS invite you to an expert panel discussion.

The event draws together representatives from climate-displaced Pacific Island communities, subject matter experts and New Zealand policy specialists. They will explore the scale of the challenge in our region and how it will impact the civil, economic and social rights of vulnerable communities. Which policies and programmes should inform New Zealand’s response?

Confirmed panelists include

Ursula Rakova is Executive Director of Tulele Peisa, an organisation which assists communities of the low-lying Carteret Islands of Papua New Guinea to plan for climate-induced relocation. She says climate change is not an abstract or theoretical issue for her people. Many families in her community have been forced to relocate to neighbouring Bougainville, due to the erosion of their islands and the destruction of food gardens as a result of seawater surges.

Dr. Evelyn Marsters is a New Zealand born Cook Islander living in Auckland. She is the Research Manager at the New Zealand Institute for Pacific Research, which is based at the Fale Pasifika at the University of Auckland. Evelyn has longstanding interests in migration and has written extensively on Pacific migration issues, as well as on her own experiences as a migrant.

Nathan Ross is a climate change specialist with a focus on climate change displacement issues. While the focus of the PhD at Victoria University of Wellington has been international law and the collective right of self-determination, his research also examines ethics and practical issues of public policy. Nathan has worked on climate change mitigation projects for governments in New Zealand and Australia since the late 1990s.