Social Inequalities of Health through the Prism of Intersectionality

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Presented by A/Professor Estelle Carde

Lectures, talks and seminars

SACS Research Seminar Series

5th Jun 2019 12:00pm to 5th Jun 2019 1:00pm

MY305 (Murphy Building Level 3)

The intersectional perspective, commonly used in Gender Studies since the late 1980s, appeared in the literature of Social Inequalities in Health (SIH) in the early 2000s. In this presentation, Estelle will examine the value of this perspective for research on SIH: how can it help to read, in the health of individuals, the evidence of multiple, overlapping and co-constructed unequal relationships?

After a presentation of the principles that characterize intersectionality, Estelle will give a few examples of how intersectionality can expand the analysis of empirical results on SIH. Concluding with the changes that intersectionality has brought to SIH research. This presentation will mostly rely on a review of literature but it will also include some of Estelle's own empirical research done in French Guyana.

For more information contact: Gill Blomgren

Speaker Bios

Estelle Carde is an associate professor of Sociology at the Université de Montréal, Canada. Her main research interest is social inequalities in health. Her first researches focused on foreigners and racial minorities’ health. Her angle was the discriminations in their access to care. Some of these studies were conducted in French Guiana, an oversea French territory, whose ethnic composition, slavery past and location in South America give altogether a specific configuration to such discriminations within the French health system. She has subsequently broadened her approach to social inequalities in health by considering other social status than that of foreign origin and race, such as socio-economic status and gender, in an intersectional perspective. Her present research focuses on the social inequalities in the credibility of the speech of people who report suffering from chronic pain.