Milad Moradibistouni

Use of zero energy prefabricated Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU) as a potential solution to the shortage of housing in New Zealand.

The New Zealand population is growing fast, which means the need for more houses that should be built easily, cheaply and fast and be aligned with the contemporary needs of the growing population.

There are many factors affecting housing suitability. My research focus on two key factors affecting the ability of the New Zealand housing industry to meet the growing need for more houses. These factors are the type of houses (apartment blocks, villas, or units) which should be built and the method of construction (on-site or off-site) that should be used to build the dwellings.

This research investigates the use of prefabricated Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU) as a potential solution to the shortage of housing in New Zealand due their efficiency in terms of resource use and benefits.

The aim of this thesis is to establish whether there is a role for the prefabrication of ADUs to provide affordable and liveable houses for New Zealanders. A recent study shows that by partitioning existing house into smaller units more than 180,000 new houses could be added to the New Zealand housing market with no impinging on unused residential land. Whether prefabrication has a role in such partitioning is yet to be determined.

Contact me at Milad.bistouni@vuw.ac.nz or M_mbarchi@yahoo.com.

Supervisors

Prof. Brenda Vale and Dr. Nigel Isaacs.