Wai-te-Ata Press

Past Events

Conferences

THATCamp Wellington 2013

Date: 28 November 2013

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Railway Station, Pipitea Campus, Victoria University of Wellington

The Humanities and Technology Camp is an open, informal unconference where people come together to make connections, learn new skills and discuss opportunities and challenges. To find out more visit THATCamp W13

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Courses

Artistic Printing

Date: 26–30 January 2015

Time: 9.00 am

Event: Australasian Rare Books Summer School
Course tutors: Marty Vreede, Senior Lecturer in Printmaking, Quay School of the Arts, Whanganui and Sydney Shep, Reader in Book History and Director of Wai-te-ata Press, VUW
Venue: Wai-te-ata Press, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand

A 5-day, jointly-taught, advanced letterpress studio exploring innovative techniques in contemporary printmaking as well as looking back to the nineteenth-century artistic printing movement. This course is tailored for practicing letterpress printers who will work with the tutors in advance to scope out a programme to satisfy their needs.


For more information visit the RBSS 2015 website

Geographic Information Systems for Digital Humanities

Date: 26–30 January 2015

Time: 9.00 am

Event: Australasian Rare Books Summer School
Course tutor: Ian Gregory, Professor of Digital Humanities, Lancaster University, UK
Venue: Kelburn campus, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand

This 5-day course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in the digital humanities. The course will be relevant to all humanities researchers who are interested in the geographies that their sources may hold, or whose research questions are geographical in nature. You will have an opportunity to work on your own data and participate in a group project. We do not assume any familiarity with GIS although a good level of general competence with computers is helpful.


For more information visit the RBSS 2015 website

History of Cartography/Maps

Date: 26–30 January 2015

Time: 9.00 am

Event: Australasian Rare Books Summer School
Course tutor: Julie Sweetkind-Singer, Assistant Director of Geospatial, Cartographic and Scientific Data & Services, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford University
Venue: Victoria University of Wellington and National Library, Wellington, New Zealand

This 5-day course is designed to provide a general overview of the history of maps as well as their use in modern day teaching and research. No previous experience is necessary. Topics will include:

  • The production and use of maps
  • The rise of the map trade in Europe and America
  • The role of maps as cultural and social objects
  • The wide variety and types of maps produced
  • Conservation issues
  • The role of museums and libraries as stewards of the content

For more information visit the RBSS 2015 website

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Public Lectures

D.F. McKenzie Lecture

Date: 22 March 2012

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Hunter Council Chamber

Leslie Howsam  

Professor Leslie Howsam, University of Windsor, CANADA delivers the 2012 McKenzie Lecture entitled:

New Zealanders of the Mind:
Using McKenzie’s Methods to Study Macaulay’s Readers

D. F. McKenzie has inspired a generation of book historians in various disciplines with his capacious concept of a “sociology of texts.” Drawing on his own experience of the Wai-te-ata Press and research in archives, McKenzie identified as “printers of the mind” some 18th century workers who did not exist outside the imagination of scholars who inferred their existence from limited evidence. He documented their labour processes as printers working in a social network with other book people. Leslie Howsam applies these ideas to the study of history, and in particular to the question of how readers received Thomas Babington Macaulay’s History of England and other contemporary works in an age of empire. One sort of imagined New Zealander could be inferred from references in school histories to “wild” and “savage” people; another was produced by Macaulay’s own evocation of a visitor from the distant colonial future, who would be to modern Britain what a Victorian was to ancient Rome.

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Workshops

Hackfest: Visualising Correspondence Networks

Date: 2–3 September 2013

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Kelburn campus, Victoria University

The recent availability of digitized letters, diaries, and journals has opened the door to new ways of data-mining, analyzing and visualizing the often complex, multi-person, multi-sited social networks embedded in texts. This two-day workshop explores the field of network analysis as it relates to historic correspondence.

eResearch and NZ-RED

Date: 2–3 December 2011

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: AM 103 and virtually via the KAREN network

The NZ-RED project is being launched with a two-day workshop on the occasion of the visit of the UK-RED team and the official hand-over of the Reading Experience Database project software. We are bringing together various eResearch experts and subject specialists to help share resources and build project capability.

Read more >>

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