Victoria Business School

Past Events

Conferences

Copyright Law and Policy in the Asia Pacific

Date: 27–28 November 2015

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Level 4, 50 Kitchener Street, Auckland

Aerial View of Central AucklandImage supplied by Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development Limited

The Asian Pacific Copyright Association (APCA), in conjunction with the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research at Victoria University of Wellington and the Department of Commercial Law at the University of Auckland Business School, invites you to its inaugural Copyright Law and Policy in the Asia Pacific Conference.

The theme for the Copyright Law and Policy in the Asia Pacific Conference is deliberately broad in scope to encourage presentations addressing the diverse interests of copyright users, owners and policymakers in the region.

Confirmed keynote speakers include:

  • Professor Peter Yu, Co-Director at the Centre for Law and Intellectual Property, Texas A&M University School of Law
  • Professor Susy Frankel, Chair of the Copyright Tribunal (NZ), Victoria University Faculty of Law
  • Professor Adrian Sterling, Patron and founder member APCA, Queen Mary University of London

Further information about registration and presentations

Go to the Copyright Law and Policy in the Asia Pacific Conference website for more information, including:

Global Political Marketing and Management Conference 2015

Date: 5–7 June 2015

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: Royal Society of New Zealand, 11 Turnbull St, Thorndon

Beehive building and Victoria Business School

The theme of Global Political Marketing and Management Conference 2015 explores the recent trend in political marketing to move from a short-term transaction-based approach, to a relationship and network-based approach.

Keynote speakers for this event include:

  • Hon Bill English, Deputy Prime Minister
  • Celia Wade-Brown, Mayor of Wellington

The conference also presents a diverse line-up of researchers, including academics from New Zealand, Australian and American universities, and political practitioners including former Green Party co-leader Russel Norman; the Programme is available below.

Document File size File type
Global Political Marketing and Management Conference: Programme 85 KB PDF

Western Economic Association International Conference

Date: 8–11 January 2015

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Museum of New Zealand/Te Papa Tongarewa, 55 Cable Street, Wellington

The Western Economic Association International Conference (formerly Pacific Rim) was started in 1994, and brings between 300 and 500 economists from around the world for an exchange of ideas.

Founded in 1922, Western Economic Association International is a non-profit academic society dedicated to the encouragement and dissemination of economic research and analysis.

Keynote speakers at the 11th International Conference, held in Wellington this year, include:

  • Robert F. Engle, New York University Stern School of Business, recipient of the 2003 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, "Latest Results in Systemic Risk"
  • Christopher A. Sims, Princeton University, recipient of the 2011 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, "Fiscal Policy to Escape the Zero Lower Bound"
  • David Card, University of California, Berkeley, recipient of the 1995 John Bates Clark Medal, "Model Based or Design Based? Competing Approaches in Empirical Microeconomics"
  • John Pencavel, Stanford University, Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association, “Whose Preferences are Revealed in Hours of Work?”

Further details, including registration and programme details, are available from the Western Economic Association International Conference website.

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Information Events

Information Session: Master of Professional Business Analysis

Date: 31 May 2016

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Ground Floor, RHG24

Are you interested in how IT can solve complex business and social problems?

The demand for business analysis skills is exploding and there is high demand for qualified people who can solve complex business problems by leveraging technology, processes, and data.

The Master of Professional Business Analysis (MBusAn) is designed for graduates in almost any discipline – social sciences, humanities, engineering, sciences, and commerce – wanting to broaden their career opportunities.

  • One year, full-time degree that is part of the new Wellington ICT Graduate  School; find out more at victoria.ac.nz/business-analysis
  • Next intake July 2017, and it's not too late to apply
  • No technical skills required

To learn more you’re invited to attend a 30 minute information session on Tuesday 31 May at 2.00pm in the ground floor seminar room, RHG24, at Rutherford House.

Note: there will also be an earlier session at Kelburn Campus on Tuesday at 12.00pm, in the Alan MacDiarmid Building, AM101.

RSVP to Kim Hann: email sim@vuw.ac.nz or tel 463 5457.

VBS Business Case Competition: Info Session

Date: 12 May 2016

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Meeting Room, RH 1217

An invitation for Victoria undergrad students from all disciplines to find out about the 2016 Victoria Business Consulting Club Case Competition.

The second Business Case Competition on Saturday 14 May will be judged by industry professionals and is a great opportunity to find out what a career in consulting could be like.

You don’t need to be a Victoria Business School student to enter, and you can join as part of a team or as an individual (you will be assigned to a team).

Commerce and Law Careers Expo

Date: 15 March 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Pipitea Campus

Come along to the Careers Expo for Commerce and Law Students

  • stalls packed with career opportunities
  • free professional memberships available
  • free careers advice and handouts
  • summer internships and graduate opportunities on offer

For more info about this event, go to the Victoria Careers and Employment website.

Business Case Competition: Information Session

Date: 10 March 2016

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Meeting Room (RH 1217)

An invitation for Victoria University undergraduate students from all disciplines to find out about the 2016 Victoria Business Consulting Club Case Competitions.

The first Business Case Competition on Saturday 12 March will be judged by industry professionals from Deloitte and is a great opportunity to find out what a career in consulting could be like.

You don’t need to be a Victoria Business School student to enter, and you can join as part of a team or as an individual.

  • Information session on Thursday 10 March at Rutherford House, Level 12 meeting room RH 1217, from 10.00am-11.00am
  • Entries for the Round 1 of the Victoria Case Competitions close Thursday 10 March @ 5.00pm
  • Register for the info evening, or get further details, at the Victoria Business Consulting Club Facebook page

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Other Events at Victoria

Engage Wellington! Hear the 2016 Wellington Mayoral candidates

Date: 18 August 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2 (GBLT2)

Join Transparency International New Zealand (TINZ) and the Institute of Governance and Policy Studies (IGPS) in their move to put the 'local' back in local politics.

Come and meet the candidates for the 2016 Mayoral election and hear them speak on transparency, strong integrity systems, and what that means to them and YOUR community.

As part of the 2016 Local Government Elections, TINZ is providing platforms around New Zealand for mayoral candidates to discuss subjects such as managing diversity, preventing corruption and progressing economic development strategies harvesting the benefits of New Zealand’s international reputation for integrity.

All welcome, RSVP attendance to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

How Much Would You Pay For An Airline Seat?

Date: 17 August 2016

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom/Dining Room

Speakers: Dr Ian Yeoman (Tourism Management Group, Victoria Business School) & David Meaclem (Air New Zealand)

This event is sponsored by the School of Management and Palgrave Macmillian

Background

The primary aim of Revenue Management is selling the right product to the right customer at the right time for the right price. Ever since the deregulation of Airline industry in the USA and the emergence of the internet as a distribution channel, Revenue Management has come of age.

The Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management, now in its fifteenth year, is the research journal in this emerging field. This special edition of the journal traces the history of Revenue Management and Pricing from deregulation, evolution, theories and application.

With contributions from leading academics and practitioners including Peter Belobaba (MIT), Sherri Kimes (Cornell), Ben Vinod (Sabre) and Dax Cross (Revenue Analytics). Dr Ian Yeoman maps out the history of Revenue Management and the major milestones that have brought success.

What about a New Zealand perspective? David Meaclem focuses on how Air New Zealand has evolved their Revenue Management and Pricing techniques over the past 20 years. Particular focus will be given to the current upgrade of Air New Zealand’s Revenue Management software to an Origin and Destination system.

About the speakers

Dr Ian Yeoman is the editor of the Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management and has published numerous papers and books including Yield Management: Strategies for the Service Industry, Revenue Management and Pricing: Case Studies and Applications, Revenue Management: A Practical Perspective. Ian’s specialist focus is luxury and premium pricing. Ian is an Associate Professor at Victoria Business School and has a PhD from Edinburgh Napier University in Operations Research.

David Meaclem has 15 years’ experience in the commercial aviation industry having worked at both Air New Zealand and Qantas. David has held a variety of roles in Revenue Management and Networks with his current role as Head of International Route Performance responsible for the Pricing and Revenue Management function on Air NZ’s Long-haul International network. David holds a BCom (Hons) in Operations Research and a BSc majoring in Economics and Operations Research.

RSVP required: A light lunch will be served at this event; RSVP to tourism@vuw.ac.nz by 10th August for catering purposes as space is limited.

MIM "BYO Boss" Breakfast Event

Date: 4 August 2016

Time: 8.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom


Invitation to bring your boss along to “BYO Boss” Breakfast on Thursday 4th August 2016

An opportunity to network with fellow industry professionals, academics, and Master's students, and listen to a presentation by Benoit Aubert, Professor of Information Systems.

Professor Bob Buckle, Dean and Pro Vice-Chancellor of Victoria Business School, will welcome guests. It will also be a final opportunity to meet Tony Hooper before his retirement.

The IT and business environments are changing rapidly. The change is not linear. New trends emerge and make old skills and assets obsolete. Organisations have to adapt and innovate to retain customers and develop new markets.

At the same time, they have to provide a seamless service and integrate the numerous facets of business.

  • How do we ensure that organisations navigate through these changes?
  • How can IT departments provide the required innovations while maintaining steady operations?

The presentation will highlight some of the paradoxes that managers have to address, and illustrate some ways to deal with them.

IMCNZ Wellington Forum: Consulting - Are You Good Enough?

Date: 16 June 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Andrew Marr (CMC and IMC New Zealand Council), a Digital/e-Commerce and Omni-Channel Specialist with over 16 years’ experience

About "Assess My Consulting", an online self-assessment tool

Assess My Consulting is an exciting new initiative built in conjunction with the IMC New Zealand to provide an online self-assessment tool for Management Consultants based on the internationally developed Consulting Skills Framework (CSF). It's early days, as the tool has only been fully available online for a month or so. However, early results are very telling in terms of the comparisons and insights they are uncovering.

This is seen to become an important tool for management consultants who are typically time poor and often don’t spend enough time setting goals and pro-actively seeking opportunities to further their own development. In addition, they may be falling back on 'tried and tested' approaches to client problems rather than taking time to explore new tools and methodologies, and truly understanding the internal and external factors impacting on the project.

Andrew will be specifically discussing:

  • Why Assess My Consulting is so unique globally and the innovation it offers
  • Its overall design and approach in terms of go-to-market product and back-end operations
  • Efforts made to ensure suitable performance and search engine optimisation
  • A review of the initial assessments completed – what they tell us about global the Management Consulting industry in general
  • Next steps in the development of the product – where to from here?

Note: Bookings are essential. Please email info@imcnz.org your attendance so that we can cater accordingly

Bio

Andrew Marr (CMC and IMC New Zealand Council) is a Digital/e-Commerce and Omni-Channel Specialist with over 16 years’ experience.

In the early years, Andrew was instrumental in the design and development of the new national land registry system – Landonline, an online system to facilitate land title and survey dealings across New Zealand and the first all-encompassing system of its type in the world.

Subsequently, Andrew undertook assignments looking at the security of New Zealand’s critical cyber infrastructure involving simulated attacks and responses in the financial services industry.  As part of his activities, Andrew became a “Trusted Agent of the Department of Homeland Security”, and his work also involved the investigation and neutralisation of real-world attacks on security of New Zealand’s economy.

Later Andrew took on assignments rescuing failing infrastructure projects critical to the supply of energy to the northern half of the North Island and the consolidation of nationwide 24/7 emergency response centres.

His most recent activities have focused on strategy and transformation assignments, especially in the Retail and Education sectors.  In addition, he has completed a number of high-complexity, high-risk global initiatives at the leading edge of international retail best practice and involving significant government business innovation funding.

Andrew has used his digital and e-commence skills to design and build the initial Assess My Consulting online application which is hosted in Houston, Texas.

About IMCNZ

The Institute of Management Consultants NZ is a professional organisation for Management Consultants and is a member of the International Council of Management Consulting Institutes (ICMCI), the governing body of the profession with member Institutes in 43 countries and over 25,000 members worldwide.

The IMCNZ aim is to raise and maintain the industry standards for Management Consultants in New Zealand through the provision of skills certification, continuing professional development opportunities and peer support.

Public Launch: Whistling While They Work 2

Date: 4 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1 (RHLT1)

An invitation to the public launch of Whistling While They Work 2, a study conducted in New Zealand and Australia that aims to improve managerial responses to whistleblowing in public and private sector organisations, and an opportunity to share experiences and views.

Speaker: Professor A.J. Brown, Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University, Australia

Background

Whistling While They Work 2 is the largest study ever undertaken in Australia and New Zealand on the eternally thorny topic of whistleblowing. Working with a huge range of partners across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors across both countries, the project will provide unprecedented insights into what we know and what needs to be done. Join Professor AJ Brown for the NZ launch of this fascinating and important project.

The Institute for Governance and Policy Studies is leading the New Zealand leg of this research, in partnership with the State Services Commission.

Bio

Professor A.J. Brown is Professor of Public Policy and Law and program leader, Public Integrity & Anti-Corruption in the Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University. He is also a member of the board of directors of Transparency International Australia. He has worked or consulted in all branches and at all levels of government in Australia,and has taught and researched widely in public policy, administration and accountability, and constitutional and administrative law. His research has had a major impact on the design of public integrity systems and whistleblowing law reform around Australia and   internationally, as well as on the political culture and practice of Australian federal reform.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome; RSVP to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Futures Online: Thinking Beyond the 21st Century

Date: 11 February 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Futures Online aims to promote Participatory Futures Thinking (PFT) in New Zealand by developing interviews with a diverse group of New Zealanders containing insights on how to build a sustainable future.

Background

As much as we may remember or dream about the past, or revise our interpretations of it, the past is not something we can truly influence. The future is different. Futures Online will be a catalyst for Participatory Futures Thinking (PFT).

Educators and their students are invited to use a series of interviews, in both video and text format, to spark further discussions about the potential for change and what they would like to see happen between now and 2065. A sample will be available at the event.

Futures Online and the Institute for Policy and Governance Studies will launch the initiative on Thursday 11 February, and the event is entirely open to the public. Refreshments will be available afterwards so please come and join the discussion.

Futures Online has been made possible by a bequest made to The New Zealand Futures Trust by Ian Baumgart, who died in 2013. Ian was New Zealand's first Commissioner for the Environment and a committed futures thinker.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. Please note that RSVP is required for catering purposes; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

IT Roles in a Disruptive Environment: Where will you be in three years?

Date: 1 October 2015

Time: 7.00 am

Venue: Victoria University Auckland Campus, Level 4, 50 Kitchener Street, Auckland

Victoria Business School invites you to a breakfast seminar at its new Auckland campus, featuring guest speakers Ian Clarke (CEO of Fronde) & Dr Benoit Aubert (Professor of Information Systems at Victoria Business School).

About the presentation

The information technology and business environments are changing rapidly. However, the change is not linear as new trends emerge and make old skills and assets obsolete. Organisations have to adapt and innovate to retain customers and develop new markets, but at the same time have to provide a seamless service and integrate the numerous facets of business.

How do we ensure that organisations navigate through these changes? How can IT departments provide the required innovations while maintaining steady operations?

This breakfast seminar will highlight some of the paradoxes that managers have to address, and illustrate ways to deal with them.

  • Date: Thursday 1 October
  • Time: 7am - 8.15am
  • Venue: 50 Kitchener Street, Level 4 Barfoot and Thompson Building, The Chancery, Auckland
  • Register now (registrations close Friday 18 September)
About the speakers

Ian Clarke is CEO of technology company Fronde, and has broad business experience in the gas, agriculture, broadcasting and television production industries.

He has an MBA from Otago University and a diverse background including farming and general management, and operational experience among major New Zealand corporates.

Benoit Aubert is Professor of Information Systems and Head of the School of Information Management at Victoria Business School. He previously held the Professorship in Governance and Information Technology at HEC Montreal (Canada).

Professor Aubert has a long record of collaborations with both private and public organisations as well as with government agencies. He frequently acts as expert consultant on outsourcing decisions, IT strategy and enterprise reorganisations.

Stories of Food, Travel and the Future

Date: 25 August 2015

Time: 5.45 pm

Venue: The Thistle Inn, Mulgrave Street, Thorndon

Presenters: Dr Ian Yeoman, Victoria Business School & Sarah Meikle, Festival Director of Visa Wellington On a Plate

Background

Food prevails in almost every aspect of life and can be seen as a necessity or a luxury indulgence. It reflects position and status; indeed, foods such as Scottish haggis or Indian curries represent places and identity. Everyone has stories about good food and places.

But what about the future? Will everyone be cooking like Heston Bluemthal, or will fast food prevail.

Please be our guest when Dr Ian Yeoman and Sarah Miekle (Director, Visa Wellington on Plate) talk about their food stories and Ian's new book, The Future of Food Tourism.

Capacity is limited for this free event, with ticket only entry. Reserve your spot via the Wellington on a Plate website.

Ideas on Tap: Institutional Challenges of Doing Business in Asia

Date: 30 June 2015

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: The Thistle Inn, Mulgrave Street, Thorndon

Ideas on Tap image

Ideas on Tap is a series of informal research talks presented by Victoria Business School. Our speaker in June is Professor Siah Hwee Ang, BNZ Chair in Business in Asia.

Note: numbers for this venue are limited; RSVP by Friday 26 June to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz.

Background

The diversity of Asian markets poses significant institutional challenges to any New Zealand organisation looking for a way in. For a start, there are various regulatory, cultural and business practices that need to be understood to even get to first base. Then there is the competitive and aggressive behaviour of other organisations clamouring for market share to contend with.

This talk explores these elements to highlight the importance of analysing the institutional environments that shapes an organisation's strategy in Asia.

About Professor Siah Hwee Ang

Professor Siah Hwee Ang is the inaugural BNZ Chair in Business in Asia, a position sponsored by the Bank of New Zealand. He previously taught at Auckland Business School and Cass Business School, City University, London. He also taught at the National University of Singapore Business School, where he completed his PhD.

Professor Ang's main research interests are in the fields of corporate strategy, international business strategy and technology strategy. He also has special interests in biotechnology, venture capital, reputation dynamics, evolution of ideas and knowledge, and management research methods. He has worked/is currently working with executives from Fletcher Building, Fairfax Media, TVNZ, and Fonterra.

Debate 3: The ‘Investment Approach’ Provides a Helpful New Tool for Public Spending Policy and Evaluation

Date: 22 June 2015

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: MBIE Building, 15 Stout Street, on the Groundfloor

Chair in Public Finance event.

Speakers: Derek Gill (Principal Economist, NZIER) and Dr Bill Rosenberg (Economist and Director of Policy, NZCTU), with commentary from Fiona Ross (Deputy Secretary, Budget and Public Services, The Treasury)

The 'investment approach to welfare', advocated and implemented by the National government as a basis for redesigning social welfare policy, has been the subject of various economic critiques. Most notably, that traditional social cost-benefit analysis provides a superior approach to evaluating policy outcomes or making policy choices.

So, is the widening of the investment approach to a broader range of public spending and policies flawed for the same reasons? Or does an investment approach provide a better basis for future Budget spending decisions?

Speakers will outline the arguments for and against each of these views. This debate will be followed by refreshments.

A series of three debates organised by the Chair in Public Finance (Victoria University of Wellington) and the Government Economics Network.

2015 Public Finance Debate Series - 2

Date: 20 May 2015

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: MBIE Building, 15 Stout Street, on the Groundfloor

Chair in Public Finance event.

Professor Jackie Cumming, Director of the Health Services Research Centre (for the motion) vs Geoff Simmons, General Manager of the Morgan Foundation (against the motion), with commentary from Dr Bronwyn Croxson,
Chief Economist at the Ministry of Health

Debate 2: Economic Evidence Should Play a Greater Role in Health Policy Evaluation

Should health interventions be assessed on evidence of clinical or economic success? One view is that economic evidence should play a greater role in health policy evaluation. Such evidence could, for example, help decide which interventions should be prioritised for funding within limited budgets.

An alternative view, however, argues that the difficulties in measuring the outputs, let alone outcomes, of the health system mean that economic measures are limited. Rather than economic evaluation, health policy should place greater weight on clinical measures and judgements.

Speakers will outline the arguments for and against each of these views. This debate will be followed by refreshments.

A series of three debates organised by the Chair in Public Finance (Victoria University of Wellington) and the Government Economics Network.

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Public Lectures

Big Data and Smart Cities

Date: 2 September 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

A public lecture from Professor William Webster, 2016 NZ-UK Link Foundation Visiting Professor at the School of Government (Victoria University of Wellington), and Director of the Centre for Research into Information Surveillance and Privacy (University of Stirling, Scotland)

The provision of electronic digital public services is undergoing a contemporary transformation under initiatives associated with 'Smart Cities' and 'Big Data'. Such initiatives present significant opportunities for enhancing the design and delivery of public services. They are also premised on the notion that data can be transformed, in new previously unforeseen and innovate ways, to extract 'value', often including the integration of public and private datasets, as well as administrative and social media data. This poses a number of issues for those in public services charged with managing electronic information flows and delivering electronic public services.

This lecture will explore the contemporary emergence of Smart Cities and Big Data and the implications for the design, delivery and regulation of public services. It will emphasise information flows in public service contexts and the need for the responsible processing of personal data, in a complex environment where the 'ownership' of data is less clear cut than it was in the past.  The lecture builds on research emanating from the SmartGov and Big Data Surveillance research projects funded by European and North American research councils.

About Professor William Webster

Professor William Webster is Professor of Public Policy and Management at the University of Stirling. He is the 2016 NZ-UK Link Foundation Visiting Professor, based at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington.

Professor Webster is a Director of CRISP, a research centre dedicated to understanding the social impacts and consequences of technologically mediated surveillance. He has research expertise in the policy processes, regulation and governance of CCTV, surveillance in everyday life, privacy and surveillance ethics, as well as public policy relating to data protection and e-government.

He is chair of the Scottish Privacy Forum and the LiSS COST Action, and is involved in a number of research projects, including IRISS, ASSERT and SmartGov. He is also chair of the Management, Work and Organization Division of the Stirling Management School.

Further information

Hosted by the School of Government. All welcome, RSVP attendance to e-government@vuw.ac.nz.

Surveillance Matters: Your Life in a Surveillance Society

Date: 16 August 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

A public lecture from Professor William Webster, 2016 NZ-UK Link Foundation Visiting Professor at the School of Government (Victoria University of Wellington), and Director of the Centre for Research into Information Surveillance and Privacy (University of Stirling, Scotland)

Surveillance, via new technology, is a defining feature of modern society.  It shapes our relations with others and determines our life chances.  Whilst surveillance is ubiquitous it is also subtle and often hidden from view.  This means that surveillance processes are abstract and difficult to interpret, let alone manage and control.  With this in mind, the governance of surveillance, including the regulation of data protection and privacy, the delivery of electronic public services and commercial marketing and profiling, assumes a critical status.

In this lecture, Professor William Webster will set out what it means to live in a surveillance society, with specific reference to how technologically mediated surveillance is governed, and how in a surveillance society public agencies become the guardians of our digital personas, and as such have a significant responsibility to ensure that the surveillance society works in our best interests.

About Professor William Webster

Professor William Webster is Professor of Public Policy and Management at the University of Stirling. He is the 2016 NZ-UK Link Foundation Visiting Professor, based at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington.

Professor Webster is a Director of CRISP, a research centre dedicated to understanding the social impacts and consequences of technologically mediated surveillance. He has research expertise in the policy processes, regulation and governance of CCTV, surveillance in everyday life, privacy and surveillance ethics, as well as public policy relating to data protection and e-government.

He is chair of the Scottish Privacy Forum and the LiSS COST Action, and is involved in a number of research projects, including IRISS, ASSERT and SmartGov. He is also chair of the Management, Work and Organization Division of the Stirling Management School.

Further information

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, RSVP attendance to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Economic Models: Toyshop or Practical Workshop?

Date: 10 May 2016

Time: 6.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Invitation-to-inaugural-lecture-by-Professor-Benoit-AubertProfessor John Creedy

The Vice-Chancellor of Victoria University of Wellington, Professor Grant Guilford, invites you to the inaugural public lecture by Professor of Public Economics and Taxation John Creedy.

Economic Models: Toyshop or Practical Workshop?

Economic models are now ubiquitous in economic analysis. They can take many forms, including small-scaleillustrative or pedagogic models, special-purpose models on particular markets and multi-country computable general-equilibrium models. The wide use of modelling has been made possible by the huge growth in computing capacity and software developments.

In this non-technical talk, Professor Creedy looks at microsimulation models that analyse the effects of tax and welfare policies and considers their contributions to policy analysis. Examples are provided from his extensive modelling experience. The value of links between economists in government departments and universities, and the role of teamwork, are stressed.

  • When: 6pm, Tuesday 10 May
  • Where: Lecture Theatre 1, Old Government Buildings, Lambton Quay
  • RSVP before Friday 6 May: Email rsvp@vuw.ac.nz with 'Creedy' in the subject line, or phone 04-463 6700.

Note: our inaugural lectures are very popular. RSVP as spaces are limited.

About Professor John Creedy

Professor of Public Economics and Taxation John Creedy is visiting the School of Accounting and Commercial Law from the University of Melbourne where he is the Truby Williams Professor of Economics. He is half time at Victoria Business School and half time in the Tax Strategy section of the New Zealand Treasury. His main research interests are public economics, labour economics, income distribution and the history of economic analysis.

The L'Oreal Story of a Practical Approach to Ethical Success and Environmental Sustainability

Date: 5 April 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

The Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Transparency International New Zealand invite you to a public lecture by Emmanuel Lulin, L'Oreal Global Senior Vice-President & Chief Ethics Officer.

The L'Oreal Story of a Practical Approach to Ethical Success and Environmental Sustainability

Big business and ethical conduct are often held up as contradictory but, increasingly, some very big corporates are building their business on the base of their reputation for integrity and ethical dealing. L'Oréal is one of them. In March 2016, L'Oréal was recognized for the seventh time as one of the "World's Most Ethical Companies" by the Ethisphere Institute. At the same time, with its unique international portfolio of 32 diverse and complementary brands, and a presence in 130 countries, L'Oréal generated sales above NZD$40 billion in 2015 and employs 80,000 people worldwide.

Emmanuel Lulin will explain that while compliance is important, ethics are beyond compliance and why this is core to their business strategy.

What  can New Zealand businesses learn from the inspiring story of ethical success  and environmental sustainability from one of the world’s most successful  ethical business voices?  How can we develop a strategy using the  principles of integrity, respect, courage and transparency to mine our valuable  deposit of principles to increase customers and business returns through  integrity systems like L'Oreal?

  • Moderator: Ian Fraser, broadcaster, commentator, former CEO NZSO & TVNZ
  • RSVP: igps@vuw.ac.nz
Bio

Emmanuel Lulin joined L'ORÉAL in 1999 as Group General Counsel for Human Resources. In 2007, under the leadership of Jean-Paul Agon, he set up the Office of the Group Chief Ethics Officer. Before joining L'ORÉAL, he was admitted to the Paris Bar in 1988 and practiced as a corporate and tax attorney at Debevoise & Plimpton in Paris and New York. He holds a Master of Laws from Chicago University and a law degree from the French Universities of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) and Paris II (Assas).

He is a Fellow of the Ethics Resource Center (Washington), a member of the Global Council on Business Conduct (New York), of the Ethics Committee of the French Agency for Development (AFD) and of the Ethics Committee of the French Institute of Directors (IFA).

Cash is King but Earnings are the Key to Meaningful Valuation

Date: 23 September 2015

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Professor Peter Easton, University of Notre Dame, United States & 2015 Don Trow Visiting Fellow

Abstract

The method of valuation that has been taught in business schools for decades is discounted cash flow. We have all learned that one of the acceptable methods of valuation of assets for, say, goodwill impairment purposes, is that we forecast the expected future cash flows and sum their discounted present values. A shortcoming of this method is that, perhaps more often than not, the forecasts of cash flows for the next few years (i.e. for the years for which reasonably meaningful and justifiable forecasts can be made) capture only a small portion of the value of the asset. Thus we find ourselves relying on difficult to justify assumptions about cash flows beyond the forecast horizon.

I will show that, rather than relying on forecasts of cash flows, we can carry out our valuations based on forecasts of earnings. Importantly, the forecasts of earnings for the next few years capture most of the value and, hence, we do not have to be so concerned about assumptions about what happens beyond the forecast horizon. I will demonstrate this difference between cash flow-based valuation and earnings-based valuation in estimating the current value of Procter and Gamble.

About Professor Peter Easton
Professor Peter Easton, University of Notre Dame, United States & 2015 Don Trow Visiting Fellow

Professor Peter Easton, University of Notre Dame & 2015 Don Trow Visiting Fellow

Professor Peter Easton is currently the Notre Dame Alumni Professor of Accountancy in the Mendoza College of Business and is also the academic director of Notre Dame University's Centre for Accounting Research and Education, which he initiated in 2004 to help bridge the gap between academia and practice. Peter also holds teaching engagements at the University of New South Wales and Tilburg University in The Netherlands.

Peter has served as associate editor of 11 leading accounting journals, publishes widely on corporate valuation, is an editor of the Review of Accounting Studies, and co-author of four widely adopted books published by Cambridge Business Publishers.

This Business Links Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR). It will be followed by light refreshments outside the Lecture Theatre. Attendance is free but places are limited, so RSVP (attendance only) to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz by Thursday 17 September.

No Longer a United Kingdom: The History and Politics of Britain's Identity Crisis

Date: 17 September 2015

Time: 5.45 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT 3)

Speaker: Sir Ivor Crewe, Master of University College, Oxford & President of the Academy of Social Sciences, UK

Presentation

The general election of May 2015 revealed a country more divided about its national identity and destiny than at any time since the rise of Irish nationalism over a century earlier. Each of the four nations of the United Kingdom is dominated by a different party; the winners of the election, the Conservatives, have a significant presence only in England. They must resolve in short order two existential crises, the prospect of an independent Scotland and of the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union.

By the next election in 2020 the 'United Kingdom' may be unrecognisable. Why is one of history’s most successful political unions under threat? What might be done to restore it?

About Sir Ivor Crewe

Sir Ivor CreweSir Ivor Crewe is the Master of University College, Oxford and President of the Academy of Social Sciences. He is a former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Essex, founding Director of the Institue of Social and Economic Research and Head of the Department of Government at Essex.

Sir Ivor is currently a governor of the European University Institute in Florence, the School of Oriental and African Studies and the University of the Arts London. He is Chairman of the Higher Education Policy Institute and an adviser to the Office for Fair Access.

Sir Ivor’s academic work focuses on British politics. He has written extensively on elections, public opinion and party politics in the UK. His books include Decade of Dealignment (with Bo Sarlvik) and SDP: The Birth, Life and Death of the Social Democratic Party (with Anthony King). In 2013 he published as co-author with Anthony King The Blunders of our Governments (OneWorld Publishers).

Refreshments following this lecture, sponsored by the Faculty of Law. Please RSVP for catering purposes to law-events@vuw.ac.nz.

Why is Britain Badly Governed? And what can be done about it?

Date: 17 September 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT 3)

Speaker: Sir Ivor Crewe, Master of University College, Oxford & President of the Academy of Social Sciences, UK

Presentation

Successive British governments led by both the Conservative and Labour parties launch too many policy initiatives that fail to meet their objectives, waste large amounts of money and cause widespread dissatisfaction amounting sometimes to human distress. The causes are rooted both in the failings of our politicians and senior officials and in the policy-making system in which they operate.

Are there ways to improve the quality of our governing classes? How should the UK’s political institutions be reformed in order to reduce the scale of government blunders? What lessons can be learned from, and imparted to, other parliamentary democracies?

About Sir Ivor Crewe

Sir Ivor CreweSir Ivor Crewe is the Master of University College, Oxford and President of the Academy of Social Sciences. He is a former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Essex, founding Director of the Institue of Social and Economic Research and Head of the Department of Government at Essex.

Sir Ivor is currently a governor of the European University Institute in Florence, the School of Oriental and African Studies and the University of the Arts London. He is Chairman of the Higher Education Policy Institute and an adviser to the Office for Fair Access.

Sir Ivor’s academic work focuses on British politics. He has written extensively on elections, public opinion and party politics in the UK. His books include Decade of Dealignment (with Bo Sarlvik) and SDP: The Birth, Life and Death of the Social Democratic Party (with Anthony King). In 2013 he published as co-author with Anthony King The Blunders of our Governments (OneWorld Publishers).

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Talk by the President of the Asian Development Bank

Date: 31 August 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Special Event: a public talk by Takehiko Nakao, President of the Asian Development Bank

Background

As globalisation and economic integration deepen, regional cooperation and integration becomes more important for future growth and development.

Asian Development Bank (ADB) President Takahiko Nakao will discuss the economic situations and outlook for Asia and the Pacific countries and their responses to policy challenges during this special public address. The talk will include the way in which ADB is supporting different sub-regions of Asia, as well as the status of regional cooperation initiatives and development challenges specific to New Zealand's Pacific island neighbours.

NOTE: You must REGISTER for this event; RSVP to igps@vuw.ac.nz using the subject line: 'RSVP for Takehiko Nakao talk'.

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences.

Making Administrative Reform Work

Date: 12 August 2015

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2, GBLT2

Speaker: Professor Eko Prasojo, Faculty of Social Science and Political Science, University of Indonesia

Background

The former Deputy Minister for Administrative and Bureaucratic Reform in Indonesia, will give a talk on what has been learnt from their administrative reform process to date.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Inaugural Lecture: Understanding Organisations in an Outsourced World

Date: 21 April 2015

Time: 6.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Invitation-to-inaugural-lecture-by-Professor-Benoit-AubertProfessor Benoit Aubert

The Vice-Chancellor of Victoria University of Wellington, Professor Grant Guilford, invites you to the inaugural lecture to be given by Professor of Information Systems, Benoit Aubert.

Understanding Organisations in an Outsourced World

A fundamental question in management and economics is to understand how firms set the boundary between internal activity and what is purchased externally. In recent years, information technology (IT) has changed how we view organisations. Massive outsourcing and internal changes have played a role, as well as 'offshoring', in which an organisation relocates a business process such as manufacturing from one country to another.

This presentation will outline the drivers behind outsourcing and offshoring and explore some key challenges associated with the management of organisations. For instance, how do we innovate in 'deconstructed' organisations, when large portions of activities are outsourced? And how do we ensure that a firm uses IT to become more productive?

  • Refreshments will be served following the lecture.
  • RSVP by Friday 17 April
    – Phone 04-463 6700
    – email rsvp@vuw.ac.nz with ‘Aubert’ in the subject line
About Professor Aubert

Professor Benoit Aubert is Head of the School of Information Management. He has been researching outsourcing, productivity and innovation, risk management, and new forms of organisation for over 25 years and his research has been widely published. He has a long record of collaboration with both private and public organisations, leading to some of his research results in risk management being commercialised.

The Business of Bribery: A Public Debate on the Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Legislation Bill

Date: 15 April 2015

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT4)

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Speaker: Dr Michael Macaulay, Associate Professor in Public Management, Executive Editor for the International Journal of Public Administration, and Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies.

The Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Legislation Bill is currently being examined by the Law and Order Select Committee (read all of the submitted evidence on the Parliament website). One of the stated aims of the Bill is to update New Zealand legislation so that it will finally be able to ratify the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) and other international commitments.

But does the Bill go far enough … or does it go too far? Will it have punitive effects on business or will it enable New Zealand to enact international leadership in ethics and integrity?

Come and listen to both sides of the debate, and have your say on this crucial topic.

Public lecture - all welcome

Corporate Social Responsibility: Do Stakeholders Really Care?

Date: 17 March 2015

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Level 1, BNZ Harbour Quays Building, 60 Waterloo Quay

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Professor Bob Buckle, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Commerce at Victoria Business School, invites you to a Lecture by Dr Sankar Sen, Professor of Marketing at Baruch College, City University of New York.

Corporate Social Responsibility: Do Stakeholders Really Care?

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a concept that has captured the imagination of businesses today, with worldwide consensus that a company’s commitment to maximising long-term societal and environmental well-being through its business practices is a strategic imperative because of its ability to not only do good, but also elicit company-favouring responses from important stakeholder groups.

However, polls reveal that most companies are still struggling to optimise their CSR efforts, partly due to their uncertainty about the conditions under which such efforts maximise stakeholder-driven value.

Professor Sen will draw on both his own research and that of many others in this area to focus on three questions that all managers engaging, or hoping to engage, in CSR must answer:

  1. What is CSR?
  2. Why do/should companies engage in CSR?
  3. How can a company optimise its CSR efforts to create value for both itself and society?

RSVP by 9 March to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz.

Please arrive in time to be seated by 5.30pm; light refreshments will be served following the lecture.

About Professor Sankar Sen

Dr Sankar Sen is Professor of Marketing at Baruch College, City University of New York, and has held positions at Temple University, New York University, Boston University, and the Sasin Institute of Management at Chulalongkorn University.

Professor Sen’s research interests lie in the areas of consumer decision making and corporate social responsibility. In particular, he investigates when, how and why consumers and employees respond to companies’ corporate social responsibility/sustainability endeavors.

He has lectured extensively on this topic in academic, company, and industry forums in North and South America, Europe and Asia, and his book, Leveraging Corporate Responsibility: The Stakeholder Route to Maximizing Business and Social Value, was published by Cambridge University Press.

His research has appeared in both academic and practitioner-directed journals and been cited in leading media outlets, and he has consulted with various companies.

Professor Sen teaches marketing classes at undergraduate, MBA/MS, Executive MBA/MS and PhD levels, and has received numerous teaching awards from various institutions over the years.

China's New Model of Economic Growth

Date: 19 February 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Professor Ross Garnaut, Distinguished Professor of Economics, Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University

Abstract

China's economic growth in the reform era since 1978 has been through a number of phases, beginning with market liberalisation and higher prices in the rural economy. From 2000 until 2011, there was uninhibited investment expansion. Driven by the highest investment share of GDP in any economy on a sustained basis, it saw the highest sustained rate of growth of output ever in a significant economy. Growth was exceptionally energy-intensive and metals intensive and drove the global resources boom. The early twenty first century growth elevated China to the world's largest trading economy and second largest economy. It also increased inequality in income distribution and placed great pressure on the global and local environment.

A new model of economic growth since 2011 is delivering more moderate and less energy- and metals-intensive growth, starting to reduce inequality and moving to reduce local environmental pressures as well as China's contribution to risks of global climate instability. That has brought the global resources boom to a painful end. China remains a growing market for many goods and services, including high value foodstuffs and internationally tradeable services.

This lecture examines the evolution of China's model of economic growth and assesses progress on the new model.

Bio

Professor Ross Garnaut is an economist whose career has been built around the analysis of and practice of policy connected to development, economic policy and international relations in Australia, Asia and the Pacific. He has held senior roles in universities, business, government and other Australian and international institutions, and is Professorial Research Fellow in Economics at The University of Melbourne.

He has been consulted on trade policy and relations with Asia and the Pacific by the Prime Minister and senior Ministers of successive Australian governments since the Fraser Government (1975-1983). He has also held positions as Chairman of the boards of large Australian and international public companies continuously since 1988, including the Bank of Western Australia, the Primary Industry Bank of Australia and Aluminium Smelters of Victoria. He was Chairman of the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research from 1994 to 2000 and also held the position of Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Food Policy Research Institute (Washington DC) from 2006 to June 2010.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

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Seminars

Designing for the Greater Good: Design Thinking and Innovation in Government

Date: 23 September 2016

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Grand Space, Rydges Hotel, Featherston Street, Wellington

Speakers: Professor Jeanne Liedtka, University of Virginia & Lis Cowen, The Treasury. Moderator: A/Prof Michael Macaulay, Director of the IGPS.

Background

There are many (probably too many) books out in the marketplace promising to tell public managers how to solve problems, innovate and manage constant change. But not everything with a glossy cover has much hope of working in the real world. Fortunately there’s a promising new idea in both the public and private sectors, one which gets us the best of both worlds by bringing together our ‘right brained’ creative thinking and our ‘left brained’ analytical thinking.

Design thinking is a new way of linking the new buzz word of innovation with some older but enduring values - efficiency and effectiveness. Using deep insights into service users or customers and with a committed learning mindset, design thinking can add a great new tool to the public manager’s solution-seeking tool kit.

About the speakers

Jeanne Liedtka is a faculty member at the University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business, currently in Wellington as an ANZSOG Visiting Scholar at VUW. At Darden, Jeanne works with practitioners and students in the areas of design thinking, innovation and leading growth. Lis Cowen is Principal Advisor with The Treasury. In her role she fosters innovation in how the Treasury works - particularly in applying new approaches to policy in pursuit of higher living standards for all New Zealanders.

Using Data to Drive Decisions: What Wellington and Silicon Valley have in Common

Date: 21 September 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2 (GBLT2)

Speaker: Mary Ellen Gordon, co-founder of Story in the Data & Analytics for Us

Background

The New Zealand public sector and US-based technology industry may not seem to have much in common, but both have access to a vast quantity of information that could be used to drive more informed decision-making and better experiences for users of services and other stakeholders. In both cases, the availability of such large quantities of data is a relatively recent phenomenon and one that requires even greater cooperation and coordination between decision makers and hands-on data experts than has been the case with previous generations of technology.

This talk will describe common challenges the New Zealand public sector and private sector US technology companies face in maximising the value of the data they have, common opportunities to extract value from data, and challenges and opportunities that are unique to each domain.

About Mary Ellen Gordon

Mary Ellen Gordon founded and led the team that implements Apple-branded surveys to support marketing of all Apple products world-wide. Prior to that she headed research at Flurry (a San Francisco startup that was acquired by Yahoo), where she mined insights from app data collected from more than a billion smartphones and tablets each month. She is currently working 'at the intersection of data, marketing, and technology', as a Managing Director of Market Truths and co-founder of Analytics for Us and Story in the Data .

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, RSVP to e-government@vuw.ac.nz.

SEMINAR CANCELLED: Healthcare-Seeking Behaviour for STI Testing in New Zealand

Date: 21 September 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Hayley Denison, Clinical Research PhD student at Victoria University

Background

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a major public health problem. Untreated STIs can lead to serious health complications including pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes, and also increase susceptibility to further STI acquisition including HIV. In addition, those infected may pass on the organism to previously uninfected individuals, increasing the amount of infection in the population. Therefore, the early detection and subsequent management of infection is a central issue in the control of STIs.

Individuals are responsible for seeking testing for STIs. As many infections don’t show any clinical signs, individuals at risk of contracting an STI need to regularly test, even in the absence of symptoms. Therefore, understanding healthcare seeking behaviour, both in the context of symptomatic and asymptomatic infection, is of utmost importance. What are the personal drivers for seeking an STI test? What are the barriers to STI testing? Do people seek healthcare for STI symptoms immediately or do they wait? What is the risk of infection transmission during this period? Data from both quantitative and qualitative research are used to explore the answers to these questions.

About Hayley Dennison

Hayley Denison is a Clinical Research PhD student at Victoria University of Wellington. Her research interests are in the field of sexual health and her PhD project explores STI testing behaviours.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal and there is no charge, so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required; any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Auckland Seminar: eGovernment Evolutions

Date: 13 September 2016

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Victoria's Auckland premises, Level 4, 50 Kitchener Street, Auckland

Speaker: Professor William Webster, 2016 NZ-UK Link Foundation Visiting Professor at the School of Government (Victoria University of Wellington), and Director of the Centre for Research into Information Surveillance and Privacy (University of Stirling, Scotland)

Background

Professor William Webster will explore the contemporary emergence of smart cities and big data and the implications for the design, delivery and regulation of public services. In the provision of electronic digital public services, data can now be transformed, in new previously unforeseen and innovative ways, to extract 'value', often including the integration of public and private datasets, as well as administrative and social media data. He will emphasise information flows in public service contexts and the need for the responsible processing of personal data in a complex environment where the 'ownership' of data is less clear cut than it was in the past.

This seminar builds on research emanating from the SmartGov and Big Data Surveillance research projects funded by European and North American research councils.

  • Date: Tuesday 13 September
  • Time: 12.15pm for lunch, 1.30pm seminar finish
  • Venue: Victoria University of Wellington’s Auckland premises, Level 4, The Chancery 50 Kitchener Street, Auckland
  • Moderator: Associate Professor Karl Lofgren, School of Government
  • RSVP to e-government@vuw.ac.nz
About Professor William Webster

Professor William Webster is Professor of Public Policy and Management at the University of Stirling. He is the 2016 NZ-UK Link Foundation Visiting Professor, based at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington.

Professor Webster is a Director of CRISP, a research centre dedicated to understanding the social impacts and consequences of technologically mediated surveillance. He has research expertise in the policy processes, regulation and governance of CCTV, surveillance in everyday life, privacy and surveillance ethics, as well as public policy relating to data protection and e-government.

He is chair of the Scottish Privacy Forum and the LiSS COST Action, and is involved in a number of research projects, including IRISS, ASSERT and SmartGov. He is also chair of the Management, Work and Organization Division of the Stirling Management School.

Further information

Hosted by the School of Government as part of their Auckland Seminar Series. All welcome, RSVP attendance to e-government@vuw.ac.nz.

Public Financial Management: Why Should the Public Care?

Date: 13 September 2016

Time: 7.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1 (RHLT1)

The Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR) cordially invites you to a Breakfast Business Links Seminar presented by Rob Whiteman, Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA).

Background

Greece, Puerto Rico and Argentina may get all the press, but regrettably the quality of public financial management and government accounting in many other countries remains dismal. In many cases the basic tools, audited financial statements, are not produced and even when they are they frequently play little role in budgeting and performance management. This exposes citizens to a variety of risks, from ineffective services to financial stress and instability. In a globally connected world, government financial distress can be contagious, as Europe has so painfully discovered. Action to address these risks is needed from citizens, governments, international institutions, and the accounting profession.

Bio

Rob Whiteman joined CIPFA as Chief Executive in September 2013. Earlier he was Chief Executive of the UK Border Agency and had previously led the Improvement & Development Agency. In earlier years he worked in local government and in 2008 was named one of the ten most influential people in local government by the Local Government Chronicle. In 2007 and 2009 he carried out the Capability Reviews of the Department of Health for the Cabinet Office. Rob is a well-known commentator and writer on public service reform and modernisation on a wide range of areas such as leadership, partnership working across local and central government, and building community cohesion. An accountant by profession, he has held several local government finance advisory roles for the Local Government Association and CIPFA, and for many years served as Secretary to the Society of London Treasurers.

This Breakfast Business Links Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR) and will be preceded by a light breakfast served from 7.00–7.30am. Attendance is free but for catering purposes RSVP (attendance only) to fiona.taylor@vuw.ac.nz .

Institutional Endogeneity and Third Party Punishment in Social Dilemmas

Date: 9 September 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 128

Speaker: Dr Franziska Tausch, Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, Bonn, Germany

Abstract

This paper studies experimentally how the endogeneity of sanctioning institutions affects the severity of punishment in social dilemmas. We allow individuals to vote on the introduction of third-party-administered sanctions, and compare situations in which the adoption of this institution is endogenously decided via majority voting to situations in which it is exogenously imposed by the experimenter. Our experimental design addresses the self-selection and signalling effects that arise when subjects can vote on the institutional setting.

We find that punishment is significantly higher when the sanctioning institution is exogenous, which can be explained by a difference in the effectiveness of punishment. Subjects respond to punishment more strongly when the sanctioning institution is endogenously chosen. As a result, a given cooperation level can be reached through milder punishment when third-party sanctions are endogenous.

Bio

Franziska Tausch is a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. Her research fields are behavioral and experimental economics with a focus on risk (risk sharing, redistribution preferences, fairness, stability of risk attitudes, background risk) and institutions (endogenous institutional choice, status quo effects and inherited institutions). Other projects investigate the effects of internal and external control in principal agent relationships and the role of anonymity in the provision of feedback. Franziska completed her MSc in Economics at the University of Bonn in 2010 and received her PhD from Maastricht University in 2014.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The use of Recording Devices in Clinical Consultation

Date: 7 September 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Alastair Macdonald, Clinical Ethics Advisor, Capital and Coast DHB

Background

Technology can be characterised as being "morally neutral". A cell phone is a passive piece of equipment. It is only when it is being used that harm or benefit results. This is true when cell phones are used in clinical encounters. The covert use of cell phones in clinical consultation is well documented and is a real challenge to the inherent trust that is an integral part of the clinician patient relationship. What about the overt use? Do current policies adequately address the complexities inherent in this burgeoning use of this technology? More positively – can the use of cell phones contribute to better health care decisions?

About Alastair Macdonald

Alastair Macdonald has been a renal physician for over 40 years. He is now a clinical ethics advisor at Wellington Hospital. Having an ethics perspective on health care issues allows him to become involved in the analysis and sometimes resolution, of a wide range of complex and contentious issues that are an integral part of caring for and respecting patients. In a wider context the concept of wise stewardship of our scarce resources is inherently an ethical pursuit. Making the right decisions in an individual case contributes to this collective responsibility. These important and often sensitive decisions depend upon good communication skills.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal and there is no charge, so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required; any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Better Policy - Child's Play

Date: 6 September 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speakers: Holly Walker and Dr Kathleen Logan, Office of the Children's Commissioner

Background

"Child-centred thinking" is a hot topic in the public sector, as agencies prepare to work together in the new child-centred operating model that will replace CYF and reform the care and protection and youth justice systems. But what exactly does "child-centred" mean, and how does it apply to the wider policy process?

This talk will provide a taster in child-centred thinking and practical tools for considering children in policy, both when children are the target, and when they could be impacted by policies targeted at others. It will cover what it means to be child-centred, questions to ask in the policy process, when and how to engage directly with children, examples of successful impact assessments and consultations, and children’s rights under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. It will be relevant to all policy-makers.

About the speakers

Holly Walker is Principal Advisor in the Advocacy Team at the OCC, where she works on child-centred policy advice, co-ordinates the Office’s work on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and co-authors the annual State of Care report on Child, Youth and Family. She is a previous Member of Parliament, policy analyst, press secretary, treaty negotiator and Rhodes Scholar.

Dr Kathleen Logan is Senior Advisor at OCC, working on structures to advocate for child wellbeing, including online tools and resources such as Listening2Kids and Giving2Kids. Kathleen was Senior Strategy Analyst at MBIE and Manager of Policy and Evaluation at the Royal Society of New Zealand following a career as a scientist in NZ and the UK.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, RSVP to Register.

Evaluating the Effects of Climate Change on Tourism: Methods and Findings

Date: 5 September 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11, RH 1113

Speaker: A/Prof Jaume Rossello-Nadal, Department of Applied Economics, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain

Abstract

During last years, different empirical studies have conducted evaluations of the effect of climate change on tourism based on different methodologies and perspectives. The aim of this presentation is to assess the most popular quantitative methods used in the literature. This review aims to shows how the effects of climate change can first be assessed through changes in physical conditions essential to tourism (like snow cover); secondly, by using climate indexes to measure the attractiveness of tourist destinations; and, thirdly, by modelling tourism demand with the inclusion of climate determinants.

Results suggest that although some methodologies are in the early stages of development, different approaches result in a similar map of those areas mainly affected by the global warming problem.

Bio

Jaume Rossello-Nadal is Associate Professor at the Department of Applied Economics at the University of the Balearic Islands (Spain). He received his PhD in Economics and Business at the same University in 2001 on tourism demand modelling and forecasting. He teaches microeconomics, tourism demand modelling and tourism economics at graduate and master levels, and has published over 25 research papers in international journals and books, monographs and collective volumes. Dr Rossello-Nadalis is Vice-Dean of Economics in the Faculty of Business and Economics and is currently involved in different research projects related to climate change and tourism. In 2009 he was awarded 'Emerging Scholarship' from the International Academy for the Study of Tourism.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, all welcome & no RSVP required.

Developing Age-Friendly Communities: New Directions for Public Policy and Ageing Communities

Date: 26 August 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Professor Christopher Phillipson, Manchester University and co-director of Manchester Institute on Collaborative Research on Ageing.

Background

This presentation will examine issues and interventions associated with building age-friendly communities (AFCs). Professor Phillipson will review the origins of this approach, highlighting in particular the work of the World Health Organisation and the global network of age-friendly cities and communities. The presentation will consider practical examples of age-friendly initiatives drawing on work in Europe and North America. It will also review some of the challenges involved in successful implementation of the AFC model.

The presentation will conclude with a policy agenda for taking forward the age-friendly debate, focusing on a range of issues around social inclusion, participation and community engagement.

Presented by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, NZ Association of Gerontology, and Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit.

Bio

Professor Christopher Phillipson is professor of Gerontology at Manchester University and co-director of Manchester Institute on Collaborative Research on Ageing since 2012.

RSVP: Registration to IGPS.

Role of the Level and Source of a Reference Price in Consumers' Valuation of Digital Goods

Date: 25 August 2016

Time: 11.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, RHMZ06

Speaker: Associate Professor Geneviève Bassellier, Desautels Faculty of Management, McGill University

Abstract

This study examines the role of reference prices as set by different sources in influencing users’ motivation to pay for digital goods. Prior research has shown that a firm can best capture the heterogeneous product valuations of buyers through the implementation of a flexible payment model such as Pay What You Want (PWYW). In the digital goods context, where a user may choose to not pay for a good at all (i.e. pay 0), the use of an external reference price can motivate payment by anchoring one’s decision about the price to pay. This study tests the influence of two sources and two levels of reference prices on consumers’ willingness to pay in a controlled lab experiment in the context of purchasing digital songs. We show that as expected, a low (high) reference price lead to a lower (higher) willingness to pay than no reference price. Interestingly, when the reference price is socially determined – when it represents the price paid by other users – it decreases one’s willingness to pay as compared to when the price is determined by the site – when it represents the site’s recommended price. This effect is significant for females only, as males did not differentiate between the sources of the reference price in expressing their willingness to pay.

About A/Prof Geneviève Bassellier

Dr Geneviève Bassellier joined the Faculty of Management in 2001. While a PhD student at the University of British Columbia, she was Managing Editor of Information Systems Research, and Coordinator for the Bureau for e-business Research at the Faculty of Commerce at UBC. Professor Bassellier was nominated for the 1999 International Conference on Information Systems Doctoral Consortium, Charlotte, North Carolina. She was a visiting scholar at the National University of Singapore in October 2000.

Her research examines the management of Information Technologies. She explores the dynamics between IT professionals and their business clients, and the role of top management in IT strategic initiatives. She also looks at how organisations can best leverage their intellectual capital through knowledge adoption from online knowledge communities, knowledge integration in geographically dispersed teams, and knowledge requirements in the context of outsourcing. More recently she started working on the role of emotions in technology adoption and on post adoption behaviors.

Dr Bassellier's work has been published in Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly, and the Journal of Management Information Systems. She is also the principal investigator of a 5-year research program on "Innovating with IT: The role of IT competence for business users, managers, and founders," financed by SSHRC (Canada) and in collaboration with Prof Izak Benbasat, UBC & Dr Jean-Grégoire Bernard, Victoria University of Wellington.

Hosted by the School of Information Management; RSVP not required.

An Insight into BREXIT's Impact on Work in the UK

Date: 23 August 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: David Coats, director of WorkMatters Consulting

Background

David Coats will provide his insights into BREXIT – what it says about what's happened to work in the UK, and what it means for the future of work.

David is in New Zealand for a series of conference/symposium presentations in Auckland and Wellington. Alongside this visit, the Public Service Association will launch a publication written by David on Beyond HR – Towards the High Involvement Workplace.

About David Coats

David Coats is the director of WorkMatters Consulting, which offers support to organisations wishing to improve employment relations, undertakes research on labour market issues and offers advice on how best to influence public policy. He is also a research fellow at the Smith Institute and a visiting professor at the Centre for Sustainable Work and Employment Futures, University of Leicester.

David was appointed as a member of the Central Arbitration Committee (the industrial court for Great Britain) in 2005. Previously he was policy director at The Work Foundation (2004-2010) and Head of Economic and Social Affairs at the TUC (1999-2004), having joined the TUC in 1989 as an employment law specialist.

David is recognised as an expert commentator on employment relations, labour markets and the quality of work, and was a member of the Low Pay Commission from 2000-04.

Hosted by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work as part of their 2016 Seminar Series. There is no charge for the seminar and no RSVP is required.

Educational Copying: Are the Current Exceptions Fit For Purpose?

Date: 23 August 2016

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, RHMZ 05

The Asian Pacific Copyright Association presents a seminar examining whether the Copyright Act 1994 should be amended to replace the permitted exceptions' for education with the broader fair use exception in US copyright law.

Topics and presenters
  • Permitted Exceptions and their Disadvantages: Education Provisions in the Copyright Laws of the Asian Pacific, presented by A/Prof Susan Corbett, School of Accounting & Commercial Law , Victoria University of Wellington:
    Unless adequate exceptions for education in copyright law are available, the nations of the Asian Pacific region, many of which are developing nations and /or net copyright importers, are likely to be disadvantaged compared with the wealthier copyright-exporting nations. This (working) paper examines the permitted exceptions in copyright law for education in China, Samoa, Nauru, Australia, and New Zealand. It considers whether the concept of 'permitted exceptions' provided in the copyright laws in many of the Asian Pacific countries should be replaced with the broader fair use exception provided in the copyright law of the United States, a net copyright exporter.
  • Should New Zealand Adopt Fair Use, presented by A/Prof Alexandra Sims, Dept of Commercial Law, & Melanie Johnson, Copyright Officer, University of Auckland:
    Parliament is considering amendments to the Copyright Act 1994 to enact New Zealand's obligations under the TPPA. A review of the Act was due in 2013; however this was postponed until the TPPA was settled. We argue that this review should now take place as the Act has not kept pace with technology and needs updating. For example the current exceptions do not permit Universities and other educational establishments to make full use of the technology available without infringing copyright. A flexible fair use type exception, rather than the rule based fair dealing, best fits an environment of rapidly changing technology, especially as many otherwise legitimate uses of works cannot be licensed. The call for change will not impact on rights owners’ economic interests: New Zealand universities spend millions on licence fees to ensure content is available for teaching and research and depend on rights owners to ensure the continued availability of the content we need for teaching and research.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. RSVP (acceptances only) to vladimir.samoylov@vuw.ac.nz.

Political Attention and Corporate Influence: Evidence from Deepwater Horizon

Date: 19 August 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 128

Speaker: Nimesh Patel, UCLA Anderson School of Management

Abstract

Using the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster as an exogenous shock to political attention to the offshore oil industry, I find that publicly-traded oil companies with offshore operations increase their lobbying activity relative to non-offshore oil and non-oil industry companies. Following the oil spill, regulatory activity intensified leading to a decrease in drilling permit supply. I find that a one-standard deviation increase in post-spill lobbying spending is associated with a 30% higher probability of a successful drilling permit application.

Post-spill, drilling permit approvals are associated with a positive and significant 5-day 4-factor alpha of 0.85%. Overall, the results suggest that corporate political influence is effective at mitigating regulatory concerns.

About Nimesh Patel

Nimesh Patel is a PhD candidate in finance at UCLA Anderson School of Management. Prior to this, he obtained a Master's degree in Finance from Victoria University of Wellington. His current research is on how corporations engage in politics through lobbying and campaign contributions in order to influence legislative and regulatory activity. His other research interests include corporate finance, social networks, and financial markets.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Self-Enforcing Agreements under Unequal Nationally Determined Contributions

Date: 18 August 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW312

Speaker: Professor Emilson Silva, Alberta School of Business, University of Alberta, Canada

Abstract

For a large global economy with normal goods and unequal world income distributions, we consider the endogenous formation and stability of an international environmental agreement (IEA) under nationally determined contributions (NDCs). Nations share green R&D efforts and enjoy R&D spillovers if they join an IEA. Non-members do not enjoy R&D spillovers. We show that the Grand Coalition is stable under NDCs if all nations are active carbon abatement and R&D contributors. However, the global abatement level produced by the Grand Coalition is very small relative to the globally desirable level. In addition, the hypothetical world income distribution that yields full participation is nearly perfectly equitable. Under a more realistic world income distribution, some nations are inactive because they lack sufficient income to provide carbon abatement and R&D. Under such circumstances, the stable coalition under NDCs is the coalition of all active (wealthier) nations. One of the important messages of this paper is that an improvement in the world income distribution, by reducing income disparities, is good news for the environment.

About Professor Emilson Silva

My research investigates the design and implementation of environmental and energy policies in developed and developing economies. In my work, I build game-theoretical models to analyze the behavior of various economics agents, including industries, consumers and governments. I also attempt to test the various behavioral hypotheses that the theory generates with readily available or unique panel data sets. One of the areas of my future work is the oil and gas industry; in particular, I will study: (i) the various innovations that occur within this industry and in its competitors; (ii) the environmental impacts produced by oil and gas production; and (iii) local and federal policy making designed to stimulate production and divide the surplus. My future work will also involve combining theoretical and empirical findings in dynamic and stochastic general equilibrium models that go beyond economics - incorporating also engineering, ecology, chemistry and physics - in order to better understand and predict the interactions and dynamics of social, economic and natural systems in evolving environments in which much needed and scarce natural resources are depleted.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Rethinking Research for Health

Date: 17 August 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Prof Mike Berridge, Group Leader, Malaghan Institute of Medical Research

Background

A major funder of health research in New Zealand is the Health Research Council which replaced the Medical Research Council under the Health Research Council Act 1990. This reflected the growing awareness that health research encompasses more than just the medical sciences. The Act established biomedical sciences, public health and Maori health as important and complementary components of health research. For each of these research areas, it is now recognised that we are much more than the genes and biochemistry that have helped us understand the cellular and molecular nature of our being. It is now clear that we have considerable control over our health through lifestyle choices some of which affect the microbes that comprise 50% of the cells of our body.

In this talk Prof Mike Berrige will include areas of health research that extend beyond traditional boundaries and will suggest some pragmatic approaches to current health issues.

About Prof Mike Berrige

Mike Berridge graduated from Auckland University with a double major in chemistry in 1967 and subsequently obtained MSc and PhD degrees in Cell Biology exploring plant growth regulation. He gained postdoctoral research in developmental biology at Purdue University and as a Staff Scientist at the National Institute for Medical Research in London. In 1976 he returned to New Zealand as the second Wellington Medical Research Foundation Malaghan Research Fellow and established a research programme on blood cell development at Wellington Hospital and Victoria University.

Prof Berrige was a founding member of the Wellington Cancer and Medical Research Institute, later renamed the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research, where he heads the Cancer Cell Biology Programme. He is a Research Professor at Victoria University and a past James Cook Research Fellow and as a science communicator, recently published a book entitled The Edge of Life.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal and there is no charge, so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required; any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Has Opening Up Data Promoted Open Government in NZ?

Date: 9 August 2016

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Level 4, Kitchener St, Victoria University (Auckland)

SOG banner

The School of Government presents the first of its 2016 Auckland Seminar Series, with guest speaker Keitha Booth, formerly NZ Open Government Information and Data programme

Background

New Zealand has been a world leader in opening up its public data for legal re-use by others to encourage transparency, innovation, greater engagement in policy development and better social and environmental outcomes. This lecture will provide a historic context, look at some international experience, consider what opening up data has meant for New Zealand, and engage in a little crystal ball gazing.

Note: this is a free event, but RSVPs required for catering purposes.

  • Date: Tuesday 9 August
  • Time: 12.15 for lunch, 1:30 pm finish
  • Venue: Victoria University Auckland, The Chancery, 4th floor, 50 Kitchener St, Auckland
  • RSVP: e-government@vuw.ac.nz
About Keitha Booth

Keitha Booth has extensive experience in cross-government policy and programme planning, development and implementation. She led the NZ Open Government Information and Data programme from its inception in 2008 until December 2015 and has advised on, or contributed to, other cross-government information policies and programmes, including the 2006 eGovernment Strategy (SSC-led), the ICT Strategy and Action Plan to 2017 (DIA-led), the Analytics and Insights/Integrated Data Infrastructure project (Treasury and Statistics NZ-led) and the NZ Data Futures Forum (Statistics NZ-led).

At SSC, DIA and LINZ, she led the development of the 2010 and 2014 NZ Government Open Access and Licensing frameworks (NZGOAL), the 2011 Declaration on Open and Transparent Government, the 2011 NZ Data and Information Management Principles and the progress reporting to Cabinet on Agency Adoption of the Declaration on Open and Transparent Government. Keitha is a member of the Digital New Zealand Advisory Board and the Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand Advisory Panel.

IPO Firm Performance and Demographic Links

Date: 5 August 2016

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Paul McGuinness, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Issues of social justice underlie the clamour for greater gender balance in top-management. The present study reveals that pursuit of such social justice is also value-enhancing in relation to the longer-run performance if IPO stocks, especially where female board members are unencumbered by family-connection with other directors.  This study examines the economic benefits of board gender diversity for state- and privately-controlled firms in Hong King IPO market.  While the overwhelming majority of non-state firms are family-controlled, clear distinction exists between those that accommodate family-connected board members and those that do not.  This issue allows for a finer-grained assessment of family influence on firm performance. More resilient post-IPO stock returns arise in (1) privately-controlled firms without family-connected board members and in (2) state-run entities.  Gender diversity serves as a positive, but only when female director presence is untrammelled by family-ties. Examination of financial performance (return-on-assets and sales-on-assets) offers further confirmation of this effect.  In contrast, gender diversity bears little connection with IPO underpricing. My analysis also identifies important IPO firm board demographics and attributes. Gender board diversity appears far more common in non-state Chinese firms.  In comparison with state-backed issuers, privately-controlled firms possess younger boards, accommodate a broader mix of nationalities but are more-inclined to unify CEO and chair positions.  Board duality, the fraction of independent directors and directors’ age and nationality exhibit little to no association with initial and after-market stock returns.  In prescriptive terms, minority investors gain from the inclusion of female directors, especially when IPO firm members are unencumbered by family-ties.  The present study therefore adds to the clarion of calls for greater female board presence.

About Professor Paul McGuinness

Paul McGuinness is a Professor in the Department of Finance at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), having served as Department Chairman for two four-year terms. Prior to appointment at CUHK, he was a faculty member of the School of Industrial and Business Studies at the University of Warwick (UK). His teaching experience is diverse, covering undergraduate, graduate and executive programmes in the UK, Hong Kong, Mainland China, New Zealand and Australia.

Professor McGuinness' research focus, in financial markets/corporate finance, has led him to publish more than 40 internationally-refereed journal articles and a widely-regarded book, A Guide to the Equity Markets of Hong Kong.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be followed by morning tea; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Auckland Seminar: eGovernment evolutions

Date: 4 August 2016

Time: 9.25 am

Venue: Level 4, Kitchener St, Victoria University (Auckland)

The School of Government presents the second of its 2016 Auckland Seminar Series, with guest speaker Professor William Webster, Professor of Public Policy and Management at the University of Stirling and a director of the Centre for Research into Information Surveillance and Privacy

Background

Professor William Webster will explore the contemporary emergence of smart cities and big data and the implications for the design, delivery and regulation of public services. In the provision of electronic digital public services, data can now be transformed, in new previously unforeseen and innovative ways, to extract 'value', often including the integration of public and private datasets, as well as administrative and social media data. He will emphasise information flows in public service contexts and the need for the responsible processing of personal data in a complex environment where the 'ownership' of data is less clear cut than it was in the past. His lecture builds on research emanating from the SmartGov and Big Data Surveillance research projects funded by European and North American research councils.

Note: this is a free event, but RSVPs required for catering purposes.

  • Date: Tuesday 13 September
  • Time: 12.15 for lunch, 1:30 pm finish
  • Venue: Victoria University Auckland, The Chancery, 4th floor, 50 Kitchener St, Auckland
  • Moderator: A/Prof Karl Lofgren, School of Government
  • RSVP: e-government@vuw.ac.nz
About Professor William Webster

Professor William Webster is Professor of Public Policy and Management at the University of Stirling. He is a director of the Centre for Research into Information Surveillance and Privacy, a research centre dedicated to understanding the social impacts and consequences of technologically mediated surveillance practices. Professor Webster has research expertise in the policy processes, regulation and governance of CCTV, surveillance in everyday life, privacy and surveillance ethics, as well as public policy relating to data protection, e-government and electronic public services. He is chair of the Scottish Privacy Forum and the Living in Surveillance Societies COST Action, and has a leading role in international research projects including SmartGov for the Economic and Social Research Council and the Increasing Resilience in Surveillance Societies, and the ASSERT European  Commission FP7 projects.

Developing Enquiring Minds: Programming for Babies in Aotearoa’s Public Libraries

Date: 28 July 2016

Time: 11.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine level, RHMZ06

Speaker: Prof Anne Goulding, Professor of Library and Information Management, Victoria Business School

Abstract

Storytimes have been a common and popular feature of public library programming for children both in New Zealand Aotearoa and internationally.  Conventionally, these have focused on literacy outcomes, aiming to familiarise children and their families with the library and its resources.  Recent research into brain development, however, has led some public library services to introduce new elements into their programming based on “Active Movement” principles.  Sport and Recreation New Zealand (2004) define active movement as “quality physical movement experiences which develop and enhance the spiritual, emotional, social, cognitive and physiological growth of the child” (Sport and Recreation New Zealand, 2004, p. 5).  It is now accepted that movement is vital for the developing brain and body of the growing child as it develops connections in the mind/body system. Movement creates and strengthens the connections within the brain and the nerve pathways around the body. In recognition of this and to support families in providing children in their care with a broad range of active movement experiences, public library services in New Zealand Aotearoa are extending their children’s programming to include Active Movement activities.

Incorporating simple rhymes, songs and sometimes shared reading, the programmes provide positive movement experiences for very young children to simulate the development of the brain and body, thus building the foundations for later learning.  Drawing on the results of a Summer Scholarship project exploring the opportunities and challenges for New Zealand’s public libraries to play a role in the early childhood development of children aged 0-2 years, the seminar will present selected results of an online survey of public library services in New Zealand.  

The survey aimed to identify the extent of the active movement programmes currently offered for young children in the New Zealand Aotearoa public library domain. The survey also sought to establish the motivations and rationale, as well as any barriers around the provision of active movement programmes for the 0-2 age group within New Zealand’s public libraries.

About Professor Anne Goulding

Anne Goulding is Professor of Library and Information Management. Her research interests lie primarily in the area of the management of library and information services and her main focus is on the management of public libraries. Anne is Editor of The Journal of Librarianship and Information Science and has published widely in refereed journals and edited works and has given conference presentations on the topic of public library services.

Hosted by the School of Information Management; no RSVP required.

Australia's 2016 Election: The Final Countdown

Date: 27 July 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2 (GBLT2)

Speaker: Antony Green, Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Election Analyst

Background

Join Australia’s pre-eminent election analyst Antony Green for an analysis of the 2016 election. As the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Election Analyst, Antony was the face of election night coverage in Australia. He has worked on more than 60 federal, state and territory elections, as well as local government elections, numerous by-elections and covered elections in the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Canada for the ABC.

As well as his research and on-air work with the ABC, Antony designed the ABC's election night computer system and a number of the ABC election site's analysis tools including the predictive pendulum and Senate calculators.

About Antony Green

Antony studied at the University of Sydney and was awarded a Bachelor of Science in Pure Mathematics and Computer Science, and a Bachelor of Economics with Honours in politics. He was granted an Honorary Doctor of Letters by the University of Sydney in 2014 and appointed an Adjunct Professor in the University of Sydney's Department of Government and International Relations in 2015. Antony's expertise is in electoral systems, voter behaviour and election night result modelling. He has prepared numerous publications for parliamentary libraries and contributes to parliamentary enquiries into elections.

A joint seminar with Victoria University of Wellington, School of Government, the Institute of Governance and Policy Studies (IGPS) and the Institute of Public Administration NZ (IPANZ).

Implicit Preferences Inferred from Choice

Date: 20 July 2016

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 125

Speaker: Tom Cunningham, Data Scientist at Facebook

Abstract

A longstanding distinction in psychology is between implicit and explicit preferences. p;Implicit preferences are ordinarily measured by observing non-choice data, such as response time. In this paper we introduce a method for inferring implicit preferences directly from choices. The necessary assumption is that implicit preferences toward an attribute (e.g. gender, race, sugar) have a stronger effect when the attribute is mixed with others, and so the decision becomes less “revealing” about one’s preferences. We discuss reasons why preferences would have this property, advantages and disadvantages of this method relative to other measures of implicit preferences, and application to measuring implicit preferences in racial discrimination, self-control, and framing effects.

About Tom Cunningham

Tom completed his MRes / PhD in Economics in 2012 and his MSc in Economics and Philosophy in 2006 from the London School of Economics. He has held various academic positions including College Fellow (Postdoctoral Fellow), Economics Department at Harvard University. In 2013 he held the position of Assistant Professor at the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES), in Stockholm. From 2014 to 2015 he was a Visiting Associate with CALTECH.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Challenges of Attracting Air Services to Regional Destinations

Date: 20 July 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Bruce Dale, market analyst at North Queensland Airports (operating Cairns and Mackay)

Background

The seminar will cover the history of flying from non-major cities in Australia and NZ, and the factors which have shaped the airline development at those ports. It asks what can be done to secure sustainable services?
Bruce will throw in his thoughts, as an outside observer, on the proposed Wellington airport extension, a news worthy topic at the moment.

About Buce Dale

Bruce Dale is a market analyst at North Queensland Airports (operating Cairns and Mackay) in Australia. He graduated from Victoria University of Wellington in 2006 with a Bachelor of Tourism Management. Following this he completed a Masters in Tourism Management from James Cook University in 2008. Part of Bruce’s programme included a study on the relationship between air service and remote destination development.

Bruce's previous relevant employment history is three years at the NZ Ministry of Tourism working on the tourism surveys and aviation policy work. Before this he had many years as a front line travel agent which gave Bruce a practical understanding of how this industry operates and hooked him studying and working in this area.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Superstar Fund Managers

Date: 14 July 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 125

Speaker: Dr Eric Tan, University of Otago

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of fund managers’ status on funds’ subsequent money flows, performance, and risk-taking behaviours. Using the US mutual fund industry as a laboratory from 1993 to 2013, this paper takes advantage of the shifts in fund managers’ status following the introduction of Morningstar’s Fund Manager of the Year (FMOY) award. While we find investors to respond positively to award-winning fund managers, we do not find such award-winning managers to generate positive risk-adjusted performance following receiving the award. Our further tests show that such underperformance is driven by diseconomies of scale rather than higher fund fees charged by award-winning managers.

Finally, we do not find evidence that award-winning managers are taking on more risks due to overconfidence following receiving the FMOY award. Our results suggest that the ex-post value consequences of superstar status for investors are negative.

Bio

Dr Eric Tan joined the Department of Accountancy and Finance, University of Otago in June 2014 and was awarded his PhD in Finance from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in the same year.  Previously, he was an associate lecturer at the University of New South Wales since March 2010. Eric’s current research interests lie in the areas of investments and fund managements, with a particular focus on institutional investors such as mutual funds and hedge funds. His research papers have been presented in international and domestic finance conferences and published in leading finance journal such as Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Autism: Where Have We Come From and Where Are We Going?

Date: 13 July 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Dr Hilary Stace, Health Services Research Centre, Victoria University

Background

Estimated prevalence of autism is now 1 in 68 and awareness of the condition has never been higher. But understanding of autism is fluid and contextual. Early descriptions of autism were influenced by events in the Nazi era. Since then responses have ranged from the ‘refrigerator’ mother-blaming of the 1960s to the recent rise of the autistic self-advocacy rights movement. Now we have assistive technology to help those nonverbal speak, and research attempting to pinpoint biological causes. Parents are offered an increasing range of interventions. Meanwhile families often struggle to find welcoming schools and autistic adults to find employment. Yet all this is happening with almost no autism specific New Zealand data.

Bio

Hilary Stace has a long involvement with autism and advocacy issues. She researched New Zealand autism policy for her 2011 PhD and found that complex, often contradictory understandings of autism and approaches signalled that autism could be considered a wicked policy problem.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal and there is no charge, so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required; any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Academia-Industry Collaboration: An Airport Love Story from across the Ditch

Date: 1 July 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: A/Prof Gui Lohmann, Postgraduate Program Director at Griffith University’s Aviation Department, Queensland

Background

In this presentation, A/Prof Gui Lohmann shares his own journey of industry collaboration as an academic, particularly engaging with airport operators in Australia. He provides examples of small and large grants and projects, tackling some of the opportunities and challenges he has experienced in the last three years.
This presentation also provides an overview of one of the research projects aiming to analyse the travel patterns and behaviours of Gold Coast airport outbound passengers.

Three main aims are tackled in this presentation. Firstly, an analysis of the factors related to travel choices, including airfare affordability, proximity of residence to the airport, flight schedules and preferred airlines is provided. Secondly, a comparison using census data is made to test whether there is a relationship between air travel patterns and socioeconomic characteristics. Thirdly, the retail shopping behaviour of passengers at the Gold Coast facilities is examined. The results rely on a very large sample of over 4,600 local passengers living in the catchment areas of the airport.

Bio

Dr Gui Lohmann is Associate Professor in Aviation Management and Postgraduate Program Director at Griffith University’s Aviation Department (Australia). He is also a member of the Griffith Institute for Tourism (GIFT) and has research interests in air transport management, tourism transport, airport passenger travel patterns and behaviours.

Gui has collaborated with a number of organisations, including Queensland Airports Ltd (QAL), the Aviation Innovation Network (AIN), Adelaide Airport Ltd, the Brazilian Ministry of Tourism, the World Tourism Organization (WTO), the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), in addition to providing training to the Abu Dhabi Tourism Authority personnel (UAE) and the Danang Center for Tourism Promotion, Vietnam.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, any queries please email: tourism@vuw.ac.nz.

Aggregating Time Preference with Decreasing Impatience

Date: 1 July 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 125

Speaker: Nina Anchugina, Doctoral Candidate, University of Auckland

Abstract

It is well-known that for a group of time-consistent decision makers their collective time preferences may become time-inconsistent. Jackson and Yariv (2014) demonstrated that the result of aggregation of exponential discount functions always exhibits present bias. We show that when preferences satisfy the axioms of Fishburn and Rubinstein (1982), present bias is equivalent to decreasing impatience (DI). Applying the notion of comparative DI introduced by Prelec (2004), we generalize the result of Jackson and Yariv (2014).

We prove that the aggregation of distinct discount functions from comparable DI classes results in the collective discount function which is strictly more DI than the least DI of the functions being aggregated. We also prove an analogue of Weitzman's (1998) result, for hyperbolic rather than exponential discount functions. We show that if a decision maker is uncertain about her hyperbolic discount rate, then long-term costs and benefits will be discounted at a rate which is the probability-weighted harmonic mean of the possible hyperbolic discount rates.

This is joint work with Matthew Ryan (Auckland University of Technology) and Arkadii Slinko (University of Auckland).

Bio

Nina completed her BSc (Honours) in Irkutsk State University (Siberia) specialising in mathematical methods in economics. After working as an economist in the coal mining industry for four years, she received a University of Auckland Doctoral scholarship and to study intertemporal decision making. She is interested in interdisciplinary projects with her two main topics of interest being axiomatic description of discount functions and aggregating time preferences.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Taxation and Consumption: Evidence from a Representative Survey of the German Population

Date: 24 June 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 125

Speaker: Professor Bernd Hayo, (Macroeconomics), Philipps University of Marburg

Abstract

Using a representative survey of the German population, this paper studies self-reported individual consumption responses to a recent exogenous payroll tax reduction. About 55 per cent of the respondents report that they spend the extra money, indicating considerable potential for tax changes to affect consumption and economic activity.

Our analysis of the socio-demographic and economic covariates of consumption responses suggests, among other effects, that interest rates are related to consumption responses to tax changes, and that households with higher income have a higher propensity to consume.

Bio

Bernd Hayo has been Professor of Macroeconomics and member of the Marburg Centre for Institutional Economics (MACIE) at the Philipps-University of Marburg since 2004. He received an MSc from the University of Bristol in 1993 and a PhD from the University of Bamberg in 1997 and worked at the Universities of Bonn and Duisburg-Essen as a post-doctoral researcher. He was a visiting professor at the Universities of Bonn, Frankfurt, Georgetown and Göttingen.

His research focus is quite broad, sometimes interdisciplinary, typically employing various empirical methods. Particular emphasis is placed on studying questions related to monetary and fiscal policy, political economy, socio-economics, and law and economics. He publishes extensively in international refereed journals and regularly presents his work at conferences and research seminars. Currently, he is visiting the Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Towards Greater Transparency

Date: 21 June 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Rob Sturrock, Centre for Policy Development, Sydney

Background

Rob Sturrock has recently co-authored a report called Grand Alibis: How declining public sector capability affects services for the disadvantaged, which looks at the ways contracting out has affected the most disadvantaged in our communities.

Come along and hear Rob talk about how there should be greater transparency in those services.

Bio

Rob Sturrock is a CPD Policy Director based in Sydney and works across their three research programs. In 2015 he was the lead author of The Longest Conflict: Australia’s climate security challenge and co-author of Grand Alibis: how declining public sector capability affects services for the disadvantaged. Rob has written op eds on Australian politics, climate change and national security for Fairfax papers, The Huffington Post and the Australian Strategic Policy Institute.

Rob has professional experience across public policy, consultancy and law. As a graduate he worked for KPMG‘s Health and Human Services Practice and was promoted to Senior Social Policy Advisor. In his time at KPMG he reviewed programs and developed policies for portfolios such as disability, aged care and Indigenous services. Rob also worked for Minter Ellison Lawyers, predominately in their environment and planning legal team.

Prior to joining CPD Rob worked for the Australian Trade Commission in their International Operations division, working with Senior Trade Commissioners in Japan, North America, UK, Western Europe, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. He holds a Masters in International Relations from the London School of Economics, and an Arts/Law degree from Sydney University.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. RSVP attendance to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

The Current State of the BEPS Agenda - OECD & EU

Date: 15 June 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Kelburn Campus, Hunter Council Chamber

The Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR) cordially invites you to a Business Links Seminar presented by Professor of Tax Management Eva Eberhartinger, Vienna University of Economics and Business.

Background

Since 2010, media reports have drawn attention to the fact that some highly profitable multinational companies seem to pay comparatively little corporate income tax in the source country, with effective tax rates on foreign profits of Google Inc. and Apple Inc., for example, of 3% and 1%, respectively. In 2013, the OECD published a global action plan comprising 15 actions aimed at tackling the base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS) of multinational enterprises. After two years of intense work the final reports on the actions were delivered and endorsed by the G20 in February 2016. Since then, the OECD together with non-OECD countries have worked on specification and implementation. The EU strongly supports the OECD, it issued a draft directive which addresses several of the BEPS issues. However, the draft directive is not fully in line with the OECD´s suggestions.

Professor Eberhartinger's talk will present the background of the BEPS Action Plan and discuss the current state of implementation in OECD and EU. She will critically analyse the effect that the measures suggested may have, from a tax policy perspective as well as from a firm´s perspective.

Bio

Eva Eberhartinger is Professor of Tax Management at the Department of Finance, Accounting & Statistics at Vienna University of Economics and Business. From 2006 to 2011 she was the Vice-Rector, Financial Affairs at Vienna University. In her research, she focuses on the effect of tax on management decisions, with particular emphasis on multinational groups. Current projects include the effect of heuristics on the decision making process in international tax planning, the views of international tax practitioners on the OECD’s BEPS Action Plan, the relevance of income tax disclosure in financial statements , and the effect of co-operative compliance programmes on firms.

Prior to her position at WU, she was Professor of Tax Accounting at the University of Münster (Germany). She has held visiting positions at the University of Exeter, the University of Urbana-Champaign (US), HEC Paris, McGill University, HEC Montréal, and the University of Malta. She is currently on research sabbatical at Macquarie University, Sydney.

This Business Links Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR) and will be followed by light refreshments. Attendance is free but places are limited, so RSVP (attendance only) to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz .

'Superheroes Don't Take Sick Leave': Presenteeism in the New Zealand Senior Medical Workforce

Date: 14 June 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Dr Charlotte Chambers, Principal Analyst (Policy and Research), Association of Salaried Medical Specialists

Background

Presenteeism, or working when too unwell, fatigued or stressed to be at work, can have serious consequences. Presenteeism is likely to influence the safety and well-being of both patients and those who care for them. This presentation reports back on research conducted in September 2015 on rates of presenteeism in the senior medical workforce of New Zealand’s public hospitals and examines reasons why this workforce feels pressured to work through illness. Relationships between rates of presenteeism and other variables including amounts of sick leave, demographic factors and cultural and professional norms are explored. Presenteeism appears a widespread, well-recognised behavioural norm. Senior doctors worry about the impact of their sick leave on patient’s access to timely health care. The strong pressures to attend work when unwell reflect the high value placed on duty of care but also tensions around defining responsible behaviour in this regard.

Bio

Charlotte Chambers is the Principal Analyst (Policy and Research) at the Association of Salaried Medical Specialists. Charlotte is a former lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Otago and holds a PhD from the University of Edinburgh.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal and there is no charge, so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required; any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Testing Theories of Gender Discrimination using Linked Employer-Employee Data

Date: 10 June 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 125

Speaker: Dr Isabelle Sin, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research

Abstract

Women in New Zealand earn, on average, 18-25 percent less than comparable men. In this paper, we use a decade of annual wage and productivity data from New Zealand’s Linked Employer-Employee Database, which covers nearly the entire economy, to jointly estimate firm production functions and wage bill equations to evaluate whether differences in worker productivity explain why women get paid, on average, less than statistically similar men and, if not, whether the pay gap is indicative that women are discriminated against in the labour market. We next exploit heterogeneity in measured discrimination across industries and over time, along with detailed data on firm profitability, sector competitiveness and other firm characteristics, to evaluate different economic theories of the persistence of discrimination.

Bio

Dr Isabelle Sin joined Motu as a Fellow in January 2012 after completing her PhD in Economics at Stanford University, California.

Her research areas are applied microeconomics and economic history, particularly the fields of the economics of knowledge and its international and domestic diffusion. Her interests also include migrants as carriers of ideas.  In her doctoral dissertation, she studied flows of books translations between countries to gain insight into the international flow of ideas codified in books.

Isabelle graduated from the University of Canterbury in 2002 with an Honours degree in economics. She then worked at the Reserve Bank of New Zealand and Motu before leaving New Zealand to pursue her doctoral studies.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Open Data: the New Oil of the Digital Economy

Date: 2 June 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Rochelle Stewart-Allen, Senior Analyst, Open Government Data and Information Programme, Land Information NZ

Background

The real value of open data comes when people outside those who collected it take those raw datasets and analyse them, visualise them, track trends, build new apps, or find new and innovative solutions to old problems. What makes open data significant is not that the data is available, it is that the raw material becomes a tool to engage people. It is a tool for participation. This presentation will provide an overview of how open data is changing the world, where to find it, and ways the data is being used to drive new social and economic outcomes.

Bio

Rochelle Stewart-Allen has extensive experience in relationship management, strategic planning and project management across the business, government, NGO and community sectors. With a passion for transparency, accountability and justice, Rochelle is a firm believer in open government and open education. She founded Daya Trust in May 2009, a New Zealand charity globally empowering women and girls through education.

As an Arts graduate, Rochelle spent her former years teaching tertiary art. She then moved into roles providing strategic and business advice across the corporate and government sector, and completed post-graduate study in Strategic Studies.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. RSVP to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

"Are We There Yet?": Five Years on the Road to Addressing Child Poverty

Date: 31 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Dr Russell Wills, Children's Commissioner

Background

It has been nearly five years since Dr Russell Wills took up the role as the nation's advocate for children. One of his major priorities as Children’s Commissioner has been to address the 'wicked problem' of child poverty and advocate for solutions. As a practicing paediatrician he saw the impact of poverty on the children in his clinic and knew that the consequences for the country as a whole were too great to ignore.

Early in his term Dr Wills convened an expert advisory group and tasked them with finding solutions to child poverty. Since then the national mood has changed, with child poverty becoming one of the issues most concerning New Zealanders. There is pleasing progress in other areas too, but much is left unchanged. So five years on -- what next?

Bio

Dr Russell Wills started his five year term as Children’s Commissioner in July 2011 and he combines the role with his work as a paediatrician at Hawke’s Bay District Health Board (HBDHB).

After training at the University of Otago Medical School, Russell studied paediatrics overseas and gained a Master of Public Health degree in Brisbane. He then returned to New Zealand and worked as national paediatrician for Plunket, a senior lecturer at the Wellington School of Medicine and community paediatrician at Wellington Hospital before moving to Hawke’s Bay in 2001.

At the HBDHB he led the Family Violence Intervention Programme, Before-School Check Programme and Child and Youth Mortality Review Committee. He has also been involved in the Ministry of Education Positive Behaviour for Learning Programme implementation, Incredible Years strategic group and the Youth to Men governance group in Hawke’s Bay.

Russell has held leadership roles in community paediatrics with the Paediatric Society of New Zealand and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, and has contributed to national guidelines and projects on autism, family violence, child abuse and medical aspects of children in Child, Youth and Family care.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, RSVP to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Stockmarket Reaction to Accounting Misstatements: Australian Evidence

Date: 27 May 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Kamran Ahmed, La Trobe Business School

Abstract

We document the characteristics of accounting misstatements and examine the stock market reaction to their announcements for Australian listed firms for the period 2003 to 2013. About 4.1% of firm years have a misstatement with the peak of about 6.3% in 2009. About 58% of the misstatements change prior-period earnings or equity, and the mean (median) percentage change to earnings is about -44.7 (-5.6) and to equity it is about -8.4 (-1.5). More than 88% of these misstatement disclosures are ‘stealth’; that is disclosed in the financial statements only. We find no market reaction for the average misstatement announcement and reactions from about -1.0% to about -2.1% for announcements that reduce prior-period equity, depending on the return window. We find that the market reacts slowly and generally negatively to the accounting issues associated with misstatements, and that these reactions are strongest for non-stealth disclosures.

Bio

Kamran Ahmed is Professor of Accounting, La Trobe Business School. He was Head of School of Accounting from 2006-2010. Professor Ahmed began his academic career in Australia in 1988 at the Australian National University, and later had academic appointments at Victoria University of Wellington and the University of New England prior to joining La Trobe University in 1999.

Professor Ahmed’s research interests are corporate disclosure, corporate accounting policy choice, earnings management, international accounting harmonization, accounting and reporting practices in South Asia, and microfinance reporting.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Delays in Public Goods

Date: 20 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 127

Speaker: Dr Dennis Wesselbaum, University of Otago

Abstract

This paper develops a stochastic endogenous growth model in continuous time with public capital. We enrich the standard framework by adding implementation delays in government investment projects. The realization date of those projects is uncertain and driven by Poisson shocks. Our goal is to stress the importance of those delays and highlight the differences to the canonical model without lags.  We solve our model numerically using a waveform relaxation algorithm and show that the introduced uncertainty has sizable effects on agents’ behaviour.  Finally, we discuss the effects of three historical policy reforms in government expenditures, taxation, and reallocating government expenditures.

Bio

Dennis Wesselbaum is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) at the University of Otago. He obtained a Diploma in Economics from Kiel University and worked at the Kiel Institute for the World Economy before obtaining his Doctorate from the University of Hamburg.

Dr Wesselbaum is a macroeconomist with both theoretical and empirical interests, researching Monetary and Fiscal Policy, Labour Economics, Time Series Econometrics, and Game Theory. His focus is on issues related to the interaction between fiscal and monetary policy, the effects and transmission mechanisms of fiscal and monetary policy in the short- and long-run, and labour market dynamics.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Texas of the South? Economic Development, Petroleum and Environmental Conflict in NZ

Date: 20 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT 1)

Speaker: Dr Terrence Loomis, Visiting Research Scholar, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Presentation

Shortly after the National government came to power in 2008, it set out a policy framework called the Business Growth Agenda that included the expansion of the oil and gas industry in hope of a ‘game changing’ discovery. To achieve its aims, the Government undertook a number of orchestrated steps in close collaboration with the petroleum industry to remove perceived impediments to industry expansion, promote the petroleum industry to ‘middle New Zealand,’ and defuse, co-opt or subvert environmental opposition. The petroleum industry developed its own set of strategies, or borrowed them from overseas, to help achieve their mutual aims.

This seminar examines some of these government manoeuvres and oil industry strategies more closely, and how resistance and counter-strategies by environmental organisations and local anti-fracking protesters not only disrupted government/industry efforts but altered institutional relations and values between the state, Big Oil and the environmental movement.

Bio

Dr Terrence Loomis is a Visiting Research Scholar in the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies at Victoria University. He holds a BA from Hamline University in Minnesota, an MA (1st Hons) in Social Anthropology from Auckland University, a PhD in Economic Anthropology from the University of Adelaide, and an Economic Development Finance Professional (EDFP) certificate from the National Development Council of America. He has over 15 years research and development consulting experience in the US, Canada, Australia, the Pacific and New Zealand. He was Director of Economic Development for the Mdewakanton Dakota tribe of Prairie Island, Minnesota for four years. Between 1997-2000 he was Foundation Professor of Development Studies in the School of Maori and Pacific Development at Waikato University, before becoming a senior policy advisor with the New Zealand government.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome and no RSVP required, but please sign in on arrival; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Improved Models to Detect Fraud in Financial Statements

Date: 20 May 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Adrian Gepp, Bond University, Queensland

Abstract

Studies have estimated the median loss from a single financial statement fraud scheme to be at least one million US dollars and the annual cost of financial statement fraud could exceed 1.2 trillion US dollars worldwide. Many business decisions rely on the accuracy of financial statements, but resources are not available to comprehensively investigate all of them. Detection of this type of fraud is difficult. Consequently, there is a need for better decision aids such as those developed in this research.

Standard parametric regression-based techniques, particularly logistic regression, have been extensively studied for detecting financial statement fraud. More investigation is needed into non-parametric techniques such as decision trees and ensemble techniques that combine multiple models. Consequently, 34 different models have been compared over a range of ratios of the cost of failing to detect fraud relative to the cost of falsely alleging it, as these costs differ among stakeholders. Some models are the same as those used in prior studies, some are modifications of previously used models, and entirely new ones have also been developed. A large number of potential explanatory variables are also investigated in order to study which are the most useful to detection models. Empirical support has been found for both financial and non-financial explanatory variables, including new variables.

New models developed in this research outperform extant ones on holdout data. Using these models, financial statements can be automatically classified as either fraudulent or legitimate, as well as be ranked according to their likelihood of being fraudulent. This information can then be used to improve early detection, which would mitigate fraud’s cost and help deter its future occurrence.

Bio

Adrian Gepp has experience in teaching at a tertiary level that spans undergraduate, postgraduate and online education in statistics, economics and finance. Adrian's primary research interest is in applying statistical modeling techniques to reveal unique insights about problems of economic and social importance, such as business failure prediction and fraud detection. He has also produced papers on economic models for cross-border river systems, semi-definite optimisation in business, car insurance fraud and evolving quantum algorithms. Overall, he has published five peer-reviewed journal articles, including in the prestigious Journal of Forecasting, and many conference publications.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

The US Presidential Election, Taxes, and the Possibilities for Prosperity

Date: 13 May 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Neil H. Buchanan, George Washington University, Washington D.C.

Abstract

The Obama era in the United States has been defined by unprecedented fiscal austerity in the face of ongoing economic weakness. Although the US has been less extreme than Europe in this regard, economic growth and employment have been significantly hampered by politicians' obsessive belief that the public debt is too high. The next president will have an opportunity to make a significant break from those policies. Some candidates are proposing tax cuts that would increase both economic inequality and the public debt, while doing nothing to improve economic performance. Others propose more promising strategies to return the US to some semblance of widespread prosperity.

In this lecture, Professor Neil H. Buchanan will describe the various fiscal policy proposals that the leading presidential candidates have offered thus far, assess the likely effectiveness and unintended consequences of those policies, and analyse the impact that these policies will have on countries elsewhere in the world.

Bio

Neil H. Buchanan is Professor of Law at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C.  He is both a legal scholar and an economist, having earned a J.D. at the University of Michigan and a PhD from Harvard University. He teaches tax policy and tax law, and his research focuses on the economic effects of fiscal deficits and public debt, the importance of public retirement programs, and the intergenerational implications of the federal government's spending and taxing decisions.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Improving End-of-Life Care and Advance Care Planning

Date: 12 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT4)

Speaker: Helen Mason, 2014-15 New Zealand Harkness Fellow and currently Chief Executive of the Bay of Plenty District Health Board

Join this seminar to hear the project findings and highlights of the Fellowship year from the 2014-15 New Zealand Harkness Fellow.

Helen Mason will share her principal findings and conclusions along with some of the highlights of her year as a Harkness Fellow based at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Improving End-of-Life Care and Advance Care Planning

The population older than 80 years of age is expected to grow almost 10 percent over the next 40 years for the OECD countries, including the United States and New Zealand. There is strong evidence that patients often do not get the care they want and / or need towards the end-of-life.

Given this increasing cohort facing end-of-life, there is a strong imperative to identify options to improve quality towards the end-of-life. The research objectives were to identify: 

  • the strategic context/policy setting for embedding and supporting advance care planning
  • key success factors to implementation and whether there are existing systems which can be built on to support implementation
About the Commonwealth Fund

The Commonwealth Fund, a US-based foundation, brings promising mid-career professionals- government policymakers, academic researchers, clinical leaders, hospital and insurance managers, and journalists from New Zealand to spend up to 12 months in the United States as a Harkness Fellow in Health Care Policy and Practice.

Fellows are placed with mentors who are leading US experts to study issues relevant to the Fund's mission to support a high performing health care system; cost containment; and other critical issues on the health policy agenda in both the US and New Zealand. The Commonwealth Fund brings together the full class of Fellows from Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, and the UK throughout the year to participate in a series of high level policy briefings and leadership seminars with US health care leaders.

Co-hosted by the Health Services Research Centre and the Commonwealth Fund. Our seminars are informal and there is no charge, so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required; any enquiries to briar@campbellnaish.com.

Democracy and Political Ignorance

Date: 11 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT 4)

Speaker: Professor Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, George Mason University, Virginia

Background

Join Professor Ilya Somin as he mines the depths of political ignorance in America, and reveals it as a major problem for democracy.

Bio

Professor Ilya Somin is Professor of Law at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia. His research focuses on constitutional law, property law, and the study of popular political participation and its implications for constitutional democracy.  He is the author of The Grasping Hand: Kelo v. City of New London and the Limits of Eminent Domain (2015), and Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government is Smarter (2013), and co-author of A Conspiracy Against Obamacare: The Volokh Conspiracy and the Health Care Case (2013).

He has testified on the use of drones for targeted killing in the War on Terror before the US Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Human Rights. In 2009, he testified on property rights issues at the United States Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. From 2006 to 2013, he served as Co-Editor of the Supreme Court Economic Review, one of the country’s top-rated law and economics journals.

Before joining the faculty at George Mason, Somin was the John M. Olin Fellow in Law at Northwestern University Law School in 2002-2003. Professor Somin earned his B.A., Summa Cum Laude , at Amherst College, MA in Political Science from Harvard University, and J.D. from Yale Law School.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

The ‘Leadership Thing’: The Role of Key Individuals in Union-Management Cooperation

Date: 9 May 2016

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speakers: Dr Johanna Macneil, Assistant Dean (Teaching and Learning), Faculty of Business & Law & Professor Mark Bray, Chair in Employment Studies; University of Newcastle

Abstract

Although it has long been a central theme in the management literature, the topic of leadership receives little respect or attention from employment relations scholars. However, in our research, participants in two separate projects projects in heavily unionised, blue-collar workplaces volunteered ‘the leadership thing’ by particular individuals as central to the success of a transformation to union-management cooperation.  We review the management literature for concepts of leadership that help explain our evidence. While it is vital to contextualise the impact of leadership and recognise the importance of other explanatory factors, we argue that a particular kind of leadership – dual leadership – exercised by senior individuals from management and union can contribute to successful and cooperative change. This focus on leadership may help explain why successful union-management partnerships are challenging to create, and difficult to sustain.

Bio

Dr Johanna Macneil is Assistant Dean (Teaching and Learning) for the Faculty of Business & Law at the University of Newcastle and a Senior Lecturer in the Employment Relations and HRM Discipline in the Business School. Before coming to Newcastle in 2007 she was a workplace relations consultant working in many large, unionized organisations; and at Deakin and Monash Universities. Johanna’s research interests are in collective bargaining, and in the role of soft regulation and third parties (including government, consultants, and tribunals) in fostering workplace change. She is a Chief Investigator (with Prof Mark Bray, Prof Andrew Stewart and Dr Sarah Oxenbridge) on a project funded by the Australian Research Council on the role of industrial tribunals in promoting cooperation.

Professor Mark Bray has held the Foundation Chair in Employment Studies at the University of Newcastle, Australia, since 1997. He is co-author of Australia’s leading textbook in the field: Employment Relations (McGraw-Hill, 2014, 3rd Edition) and has published research on a wide range of topics from comparative analysis of national industrial relations (including Australia/New Zealand), industry studies (including road and air transport, hospitality and health care) and workplace studies. He is a Chief Investigator (with Dr Johanna Macneil, Prof Andrew Stewart and Dr Sarah Oxenbridge) on a project funded by the Australian Research Council on the role of industrial tribunals in promoting workplace cooperation.

Hosted by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work. RSVP to clew-events@vuw.ac.nz.

Has Opening Up Data Promoted Open Government in NZ?

Date: 9 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

An invitation to the Chair in Digital Government Seminar Series, presented by Keitha Booth who led the Open Government Information and Data programme until December 2015.

Note: this repeats a booked-out seminar originally scheduled on 21 April 2016

New Zealand has been a world leader in opening up its public data for legal re-use by others to encourage transparency, innovation, greater engagement in policy development and better social and environmental outcomes.

This seminar will provide a historic context, look at some international experience, consider what opening up data has meant for New Zealand, and engage in a little crystal ball gazing.

About Keitha Booth

Keitha Booth has extensive experience in cross-government policy and programme planning, development and implementation.  She led the NZ Open Government Information and Data programme from its inception in 2008 until December 2015 and has advised on or contributed to other cross-government information policies and programmes, including the 2006 eGovernment Strategy (SSC-led), the ICT Strategy and Action Plan to 2017 (DIA-led), the Analytics and Insights/Integrated Data Infrastructure project (Treasury and Statistics NZ-led) and the NZ Data Futures Forum (Statistics NZ-led). At the SSC, DIA and LINZ, she led the development of the 2010 and 2014 NZ Government Open Access and Licensing frameworks (NZGOAL), the 2011 Declaration on Open and Transparent Government, the 2011 NZ Data and Information Management Principles and the progress reporting to Cabinet on Agency Adoption of the Declaration on Open and Transparent Government. She is a member of the Digital New Zealand Advisory Board and the Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand Advisory Panel.

Hosted by the Chair in Digital Government. All welcome; please register your interest at e-government@vuw.ac.nz, or phone the Chair administrator Lynn Barlow on 04 463 6966.

Do Costs Fall Faster than Revenues? Dynamics of Renewables Entry into Electricity

Date: 4 May 2016

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 2, RWW 222

Speaker: Dr Thomas-Olivier Léautier, University of Toulouse

Abstract

In many countries, entry of Renewable Energy Sources into power markets has been supported by subsidies and financed by a tax on electricity consumed. Previous works have described this phenomenon through numerical simulations. This article is the rest to analytically derive the impact of renewable capacity increases on the long-term equilibrium generation mix, subsidy, and tax. This enables us to provide analytical expressions for previously obtained simulation results, but also derive additional results.

The analysis yields two main findings. First, the subsidy to Renewable Energy Sources may never stop, as the value of the energy produced may decrease faster than the cost as renewable capacity increases. Second, high renewable energy sources penetration leads to a discontinuity in the rate at which they marginal values fall, after which the subsidy and tax grow extremely rapidly.

Bio

Dr Thomas-Olivier Léautier is Professor of Management at the University of Toulouse and Research Director at the Toulouse School of Economics. His research interests include restructuring of the electric power industry, and risk management strategy and operations. In particular he has written academic articles on long-term incentives for investments in generation and transmission, regulation of transmission companies, capacity mechanisms, the value of smart meters, demand response, and renewables subsidies.  He contributes to the public policy debate on electricity markets design through a bi-monthly blog jointly written with Claude Crampes.  Prior to joining the University of Toulouse, Thomas-Olivier was Director, Risk Measurement and Control for Alcan Inc., a leading aluminum and packaging firm, where he set up the risk management infrastructure. Previously he worked as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company, a global management consulting firm, where he was a leader in the Electric Power and Natural Gas and Risk Management practices, and gained first-hand experience with “restructured” electric power markets in Europe in North America.  Specifically, he helped set up energy trading and risk management infrastructure, and advised on the creation and funding of independent power transmission companies.

Thomas-Olivier holds a PhD in Economics and a Master in Transportation from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, USA, a Master in Science from Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in Paris, France, and a Bachelor in Science from Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, France.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

How Sustainable are the UN's Sustainable Development Goals?

Date: 3 May 2016

Time: 3.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT4)

Speaker: Professor John Thwaites, Monash Sustainability Institute, Monash University, Melbourne & Chairman of ClimateWorks Australia

Presentation

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were officially adopted by world leaders at the UN Sustainable Development Summit in September last year. The goals are part of a new sustainable development agenda to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. Each of the 17 goals have specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years. The goals and targets apply to all countries including New Zealand and countries are expected to report on progress in implementing them. The SDGs are likely to have a significant impact on governments and businesses in the next fifteen years.

At this presentation John Thwaites will discuss the development of the goals, how they have evolved beyond the previous Millennium Development Goals, and the role of universities and knowledge institutions in implementing them.

Bio

John Thwaites is a Professorial Fellow, Monash University, and Chair of ClimateWorks Australia and the Monash Sustainability Institute. John has recently been appointed the Chair of Melbourne Water, Melbourne’s major water utility, which is also responsible for the rivers and catchment around Melbourne. John also chairs the Australian Building Codes Board, the body responsible for developing and managing Australia’s building regulations. He also chairs the Peter Cullen Water and Environment Trust and is a director of the Australian Green Building Council. Heis a Co-Chair of the Leadership Council of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) launched by the Secretary General of the UN to provide expert advice and support to the development of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. In 2013, John was named as one of the 100 Global Sustainability Leaders by ABC Carbon Express. From 2012-2013, John was Chair of the National Sustainability Council, an independent Council appointed by the Australian Government, which produced the Sustainable Australia Report in 2013.

John has provided extensive advice to the Australian, state and local governments on environmental and water issues and been appointed to many government advisory bodies. In 2008-2010, John was a special adviser to the Timor-Leste Minister for Infrastructure and helped develop an Infrastructure Plan for Timor-Leste and has been involved in a project to develop sewerage and drainage for the capital Dili. John Thwaites was Deputy Premier of Victoria from 1999 until his retirement in 2007. During this period he was Minister for Health, Minister for Planning, Minister for Environment, Minister for Water, Minister for Victorian Communities and Victoria’s first Minister for Climate Change. In these portfolios he was responsible for major reforms in social policy, health, environment and water.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, RSVP to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Uncertainty, Reputation and Analysts Coverage

Date: 3 May 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Marco Navone, UTS Business School, New South Wales

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the link between uncertainty about firm prospects and analyst’s coverage. Specially, we argue that, due to reputational concerns, analysts avoid covering firms with uncertain prospects. Using exogenous changes in uncertainty related to CEO turnover events we show that analysts coverage drops after an exogenous increase in uncertainty. We confirm our findings using alternative sources of uncertainty related to filings of securities class actions and industry-related shocks.

By studying individual analyst’s characteristics, we show that the probability of dropping coverage is higher for younger analysts, analysts with lower reputation and lower risk aversion, factors that indicate higher reputational and career concerns.

Bio

Dr Marco Navone has been a Senior Lecturer in Finance at the UTS Business School since September 2011. Prior to this, he was an Assistant Professor in the Finance Department of Bocconi University in Milan (Italy). He is also a research fellow of CAREFIN the Center for Applied Research in Finance of Bocconi University and has been a visiting Assistant Professor in the Finance Department of Red McCombs School of Business of the University of Texas at Austin. Marco received his Ph.D. from Bocconi University, his teaching experience ranges from advanced equity portfolio management to financial economics and he has also a broad experience in executive education.

Marco’s research on mutual funds and empirical corporate finance has been published in international journals such as the Journal of Banking and Finance and Financial Management. While in Italy Marco has acted as a consultant for a number of financial companies in matters of mutual funds’ performance measurement.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Regulatory Waves: Selected Outcomes from the Project on Comparative Perspectives on State Regulation and Self-Regulation Policies in the Non-Profit Sector

Date: 29 April 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Oonagh Breen, University College Dublin

Abstract

The advent of the new millennium has led to a noticeable growth in non-profit regulation across the globe.  Many common law countries have sought to introduce statutory definitions of charitable purposes and public benefit while both civil and common law countries have focused regulatory attention on how to better govern non-profits as a way to ensure greater accountability and transparency.  At the same time, there is renewed interest in non-statutory regulation in the non-profit sector with self-regulatory regimes attempting to shore up better fundraising practices, improved governance, and greater accountability of charities.

Led by Drs Oonagh Breen and Alison Dunn and Professor Mark Sidel, and assisted by ten contributing academics, this project set out to explore and unravel the relationship between non-statutory and statutory regulation of non-profits.  Seeking to understand better the narrative shifts in individual countries between alternatively state regulation and sector self-regulation, the authors investigated what factors influenced the ultimate choice of one regulatory form over the other.  By comparing the stories of regulatory change across 16 jurisdictions, the project attempted to identify the common drivers – whether of historical, political, cultural, donor-led or other origin – and to analyse whether common trends and learnings emerged.  The project examined the experiences of Australia, Brazil, China, Ecuador, England and Wales, Ethiopia, Ireland, Israel, Kenya, Malawi, Mexico, Uganda, Scotland, Tanzania, the United States and Vietnam.

Bio

Dr Oonagh Breen graduated from University College Dublin with first class honours (BCL, 1992, LL. M., 1995). A Tutorial Scholar (1992), she was appointed lecturer in 1994, and was called to the Irish Bar in 1997. Graduating second in her class, she was awarded the Society's Exhibition Prize and a Bar Council Bursary. She became a Senior Lecturer in 2008. In 2003, Dr Breen was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and was made a Government of Ireland Research Fellow. She commenced studies at Yale Law School in that year as a Lillian Goldman Scholar. In 2004, she obtained her LL. M. from Yale and in 2006 she was awarded her J.S.D. for her doctoral dissertation on comparative perspectives on the legal regulation of charities and the role of state-non-profit partnership in public policy development. From 2004 to 2006, she was the recipient of the National University of Ireland's Travelling Studentship award. She was a visiting professor at De Paul Law School, Chicago in 2002, at University Missouri Kansas City Law School in 2004 and at University of California, Davis in 2008. She has been the external examiner in Equity for the Law Society Final Examinations Part 1 since 2001. In 2009, Oonagh was a visiting Research Fellow at the Hauser Centre for Non-profit Organizations, Harvard University.

Dr Breen specialises in the area of comparative charity regulation and non-profit-state collaboration in public policy formation and development. A co-author of the Law Society's Report, Charity Law: The case for reform (2002), she was appointed by the Department of Community Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs to write an external report on the submissions received during the Department's charity law reform consultation process in 2004. She has worked with non-profit representatives, the Law Reform Commission and the Irish Government on issues relating to the reform of charity law. Since 2005 she is the Irish rapporteur for the United States International Grant making Project, which facilitates international grant making by US foundations. In 2006, she was named as an emerging scholar by ARNOVA. In 2007 she was awarded a University President's Award for Teaching & Learning and in 2008, Dr Breen was awarded a Distinguished Research Award by ICNL/CORDAID for her work on European regulation of non-profit entities. Oonagh is a frequent contributor at international conferences and colloquia on the topic of charity law reform and has published extensively in this area.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

The Economics of Propaganda: Are the Audacious Claims of Edward Bernays Consistent with Modern Economic Theory?

Date: 15 April 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 127

Speaker: Dr Trenton Smith, University of Otago

Abstract

In his 1928 book Propaganda, Edward Bernays set forth his case for both the necessity and the benevolence of the newly emerging field of public relations (PR). While many of his claims regarding the ability of PR to "shape the public mind" run contrary to the predictions of neoclassical economic theory, PR as a field has blossomed over the intervening years into a multi-billion dollar global industry.

This presentation will offer an overview of theory and evidence relating to this phenomenon, with special emphasis on examples – both historic and contemporary – from the food industry. In particular, it will be argued that the modern market for food – in which highly processed, globally branded products have displaced healthier, more traditional fare – represents an example of an information-based market breakdown in which low-quality products dominate the market. The observed "lemons" equilibrium is neither efficient nor inevitable. Rather, it can be viewed as an outcome that serves the interests of large multinational corporations at the expense of public health.

Bio

Dr Trent Smith is Senior Lecturer in Economics at the University of Otago. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and also holds degrees from Stanford University in Biological Sciences and Economics and Civil Engineering. He has previously held academic positions at Washington State University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and the University of Bonn.

Dr. Smith’s research interests are broadly interdisciplinary, applying economic methods in biological perspective to better understand behavioural phenomena that would seem to violate the economist's conventional presumptions of rationality and full information. His published research has focused in particular on dietary choice, obesity, addiction, economic insecurity, and mass marketing.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Destination Management in Chile

Date: 14 April 2016

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boadroom

Speaker: Emeritus Professor Doug Pearce, Victoria Business School

Presentation

This seminar examines the relationships between the multiple objectives, actions and actors involved in destination management in Chile based on the analysis of tourism and territorial plans for the regions of Valparaíso, Los Ríos and Aysén. The current approach emphasizes supply-side development by many actors and multiple actions. A model representing the Chilean approach to destination management will be presented and its implications discussed.

Bio

After retiring as Professor of Tourism Management at Victoria in January 2015, Doug spent six months in Chile as a Visiting Professor in the Instituto de Turismo at the Universidad Austral de Chile in Valdivia. His visit was funded by CONICYT.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. All welcome, no RSVP required.

A Global Comprehensive Measure of the Impact of Natural Hazards and Disasters

Date: 12 April 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Professor Ilan Noy, Chair in the Economics of Disasters, Victoria University

Abstract

The adverse impacts of natural hazards are typically measured separately by the number of fatalities, of injuries, of people otherwise affected, and the financial damage that they wreak. Without a comprehensive measure of disaster impacts it is impossible to fully comprehend their importance and therefore successfully prepare for them. We propose an aggregate measure of disaster impact, which builds on the conceptual underpinnings of the calculations of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) lost due to the burden of diseases and injuries (WHO, 2013).

The proposed measure, however, adds a quantification of the importance of destruction of infrastructure, capital and housing into an overall assessment. The index converts all measures of impact into "lifeyears" units. We then analyse worldwide trends in lifeyears lost to disasters and discuss policy implications of these measurements.

Bio

The inaugural Chair in the Economics of Disasters, Ilan Noy, is a Professor of Economics at Victoria University of Wellington and the University of Hawaii.

After completing a BA from the Hebrew University, he worked as a tour-guide in China and India. In 1998 he moved to California to continue studies for a doctorate in International Economics at the University of California in Santa Cruz (completed 2003).

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal and there is no charge, so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required; any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

The Phoenix Rises: The Australian Accounting Standards Board and IFRS Adoption

Date: 8 April 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: A/Prof Bryan Howieson, University of Adelaide

Abstract

The Australian experience of adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) is used to explore the impact of IFRS adoption on the sphere of authority (SOA) of a national accounting standard-setter (NASS). Changes in a standard-setter's SOA have direct impacts on its role and agenda and the Australian experience is relevant to other national accounting standard-setters (NASSs) and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). Relevant data were gathered from interviews with AASB technical staff and retired IASB members. The study demonstrates how changes in the social order between the IASB and NASSs impact on domestic and international standards and how power is exercised and shared in the IASB/NASSs relationship. It was found that a standard-setter’s technical agenda is influenced by that entity’s strategic agenda. The paper reveals methods adopted by standard-setters to expand their SOA and it shows the significant influence of individual persons such as the standard-setter entity's chairperson on the development and implementation of the strategic agenda.  In addition, individual technical staff members help drive this agenda by promoting a regional epistemic community of NASSs that shared values and objectives.

The behaviour of standard-setting organisations can be considerably deepened by studying the characteristics and motivations of the individuals within those organisations rather than simply treating standard-setting organisations as though they were a 'black box', ignoring the complex sub-systems that drive their internal functioning. Such an understanding would help researchers explain and predict the patterns of standard-setting behaviour rather than rely on ex post analyses of past behaviour. The findings are useful to NASSs by, for example, demonstrating the importance of employing individuals with both strong technical and political skills. If NASSs wish to have influence at the global level, then they must be proactive in driving change through networks and alliances with other NASSs.

Bio

Bryan Howieson is Associate Professor in the School of Accounting and Finance at the University of Adelaide. He has held prior positions at the Adelaide Graduate School of Business and the Universities of South Australia and Western Australia. His teaching and research interests relate primarily to financial reporting and accounting standard setting but he also has strong interests in accounting education, professional ethics and corporate governance. Bryan has published extensively including a monograph on accounting for investment property for the Australian Accounting Research Foundation and papers in academic and professional journals. Bryan has had a long association with accounting standards setting in Australia including acting as an alternate member of Australia's Urgent Issues Group and the Consultative Group and has assisted the Australian Accounting Standards Boards in research projects. He was recently appointed to the AASB’s Academic Advisory Panel.  He has undertaken a number of consultancies in the private and public sectors in the areas of financial reporting and codes of conduct.

Bryan has served as a director of several not-for-profit entities including as President (Australia) of the Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand and as Vice-President on the Executive Committee of the International Association for Accounting Education and Research. Bryan was a member of CPA Australia's 'Member of the Future' committee, is a Past-President of the South Australian Division of CPA Australia, and now serves on CPA Australia’s Professional Qualifications Advisory Committee.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Who Do We Trust?

Date: 7 April 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

The Institute for Governance and Policy Studies is launching its own national survey on political trust in New Zealand.

Come along and have your say as to whether or not we trust politicians, why we should (or shouldn't), and what implications this has for the country.

Background

IGPS report: Who Do We Trust?

Download the IGPS report Who Do We Trust? (PDF, 1.6MB)

We need to have a free and frank discussion about the causes and effects of our lack of trust in politics and media. New research from IGPS (in partnership with Colmar Brunton) suggests that there is a crisis of political trust in the country: not only is trust in our government, politicians and media low but it has declined over the last three years.

Specific areas such as political party funding are clearly viewed with great scepticism if not outright suspicion. Our respondents indicate that general levels of trust in our friends and neighbours remains high, and we strongly trust key institutions such as the medical profession and the police.

This work is only the beginning to the debate and we need to keep asking why people feel the way they do, and what we can do to improve the situation. IGPS feels that this is an important piece of research. We hope that you do too, and that you will join us in the first of many conversations about who we trust.

All welcome, RSVP not required.

This talk will also be presented in Auckland:

The Impact of Cultural Diversity in Corporate Boards on Firm Performance

Date: 7 April 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 102

Speaker: Professor Bart Frijns, Auckland University of Technology

Abstract

We examine the impact of cultural diversity in boards of directors on firm performance. We construct a measure of cultural diversity by calculating the average of cultural distances between each board member using Hofstede’s culture framework. Our findings indicate that cultural diversity in boards negatively affects firm performance measured with Tobin’s Q and ROA. These results hold after controlling for potential endogeneity using firm fixed effects and instrumental variables. The results are also robust to a wide range of board and firm characteristics, including various measures of ‘foreignness’ of the firm, and alternative culture frameworks and other measures of culture. The negative impact of cultural diversity on performance is mitigated by the complexity of the firm and the size of foreign sales and operations. In addition, we find that the negative effects of cultural diversity are concentrated among the independent directors. Finally, we find that not all aspects of cultural differences are equally important and that it is mainly the diversity in individualism and masculinity that affect the effectiveness of boards of directors.

Bio

Professor Bart Frijns is a Professor of Finance at the Auckland University of Technology, and is the Director of the Auckland Centre for Financial Research. Professor Frijns obtained his PhD in 2004 from Maastricht University in the Netherlands in the area of market microstructure. He currently has over 40 publications in academic journals. His current research interest are broad, but always applied and empirical in nature. Topics include the analysis of insider trading regulation on financial markets; the role of culture in financial decision making; the impact of investor heterogeneity on financial markets, etc.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Stanley Milgram's "Obedience" Experiments: Destructive Behaviour Beyond the Laboratory?

Date: 5 April 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (OGBLT3)

Speaker: Dr Nestar Russell, formerly Nipissing University, Ontario.

Presentation

Soon after the publication of Stanley Milgram’s Obedience to Authority (OTA) electric shock experiments, scholars began drawing parallels between his findings and the Nazis' perpetration of the Holocaust. The connection has been made so frequently that researchers now term it the Milgram-Holocaust (M-H) linkage. However, in more recent years a number of scholars have forcefully challenged the linkage. In this presentation, I argue that the OTA experiments and the Holocaust share one commonality that is so significant it may override all the historical factors that differentiate these two events. This is the reliance on formally rational techniques of discovery to achieve the goal of maximizing "ordinary" people's participation in the infliction of harm on others.

My archival research into Milgram’s unpublished pilot studies reveals the means-ends learning processes that he used in order to maximize ordinary people's participation in the first and most (in)famous official experiment. These techniques closely parallel those relied upon by the Nazis during the development of killing methods used in the Holocaust. The final part of this presentation will tentatively explore the potential connection between Milgram's findings and other examples of destructive human behaviour, particularly that of potential climate catastrophe.

Bio

Dr Nestar Russell is a criminologist originally from New Zealand who went  to Canada in 2011 on a Commonwealth scholarship to work with Holocaust Historian Dr. Hilary Earl at Nipissing University. He has published on Milgram's experiments in scholarly outlets including the British Journal of Social Psychology, Social Sciences, State Crime Journal, and twice in The American Review of Public Administration. His research interests include the "Milgram-Holocaust linkage", perpetrator behaviour during the Holocaust, state crime, homicide, commercial graffiti and the social construction of crime. Dr Russell taught various courses in criminology, sociology, and history at Nipissing University until December 2014, and currently lives in Calgary.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Why is it so Hard to Address Workplace Bullying in the Health Sector?

Date: 4 April 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Kate Blackwood, Massey University

Abstract

Workplace bullying is a serious problem internationally, and in healthcare it is a particular problem. Although anti-bullying policies and generalised conflict management strategies are commonly recommended to guide intervention in bullying experiences, they often have little impact in the management of a workplace bullying complaint. In fact, it has been said that managing escalated and complex cases of workplace bullying is 'almost impossible'. Targets are often left with no choice but to leave the organisation.

This research explores the experiences of workplace bullying from the perspective of workplace bullying targets and interveners in New Zealand’s nursing profession. It identifies obstacles to workplace bullying resolution and potential alternative approaches to intervention.

Bio

Dr Kate Blackwood is a lecturer in the School of Management at Massey University, Palmerston North. She is a member of the Healthy Work Group, a multidisciplinary team of researchers from Massey interested in psychosocial factors in workplace health and safety. She completed her PhD in 2015 which was awarded a place on the Dean’s List of Exceptional Theses. Her research interests include workplace bullying, cyber-bullying, and healthy work.

Hosted by the School of Management / Human Resources and Industrial Relations Group. No RSVP required, for more information email hrir@vuw.ac.nz.

Commodity Prices and Volatility in Response to Anticipated Climate Change

Date: 1 April 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Associate Professor Michael Roberts, University of Hawaii

Abstract

Some predict that climate change will decrease average crop yield and increase yield variability. While the first effect, as well as possible adaptation strategies, have been studied extensively, the second is less well understood and the topic of this paper. A unique feature of commodity crops is that they can be stored between periods, thereby allowing storage to smooth production shocks across time. We pair a rational competitive storage model with a statistical analysis linking global production of the four major commodity crops (maize, wheat, rice and soybeans) and climate forecasts from 16 global climate models.

The rational storage model predicts a doubling of average storage levels by 2050, slightly raising average prices to cover higher storage losses, but at the same significantly reducing price variability compared to a storage rule that is optimal under past yield distributions. Storage market responses to future yield variability greatly mitigate potential welfare losses of greater production volatility.

Bio

Michael Roberts is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, and Sea Grant at UH Manoa. His research has focused on the effects of agricultural policies, impacts of climate change on agriculture, and commodity pricing. He is perhaps best known for his empirical work documenting the sensitivity of major commodity crops to extreme heat, which may imply dire implications for climate change, and for developing strategies for exploiting weather to identify fundamentals supply and demand systems underlying global commodity prices. Recently his research has turned toward work on energy efficiency, electricity and water demand, and feasibility and cost effectiveness of highly-renewable electric systems facilitated by demand response and storage.

Until recently he served as Co-Editor for the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economics and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and has served on several other editorial boards for leading agricultural, environmental and resource economics journals. Before coming to Hawaii he was an Assistant and then Associate Professor at North Carolina State University.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

A New Equilibrium for New Zealand Aid: The 2015 NZ Aid Stakeholder Survey

Date: 31 March 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1 (RHLT1)

Speaker: Dr Terence Wood, Research Fellow at the Development Policy Centre, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific

Background

It has been over seven years since a change in government brought sweeping changes to the New Zealand government aid programme. This seminar will draw on unique evidence from a survey of New Zealand’s aid stakeholders to examine the current state of New Zealand aid. Strengths and weaknesses of the New Zealand government aid programme will be examined and the potential for change discussed.

In 2013 the Australian National University’s Development Policy Centre conducted the first comprehensive survey of Australia’s aid stakeholders, canvassing the views of NGOs and development contractors on the state of Australian aid. In 2015, in addition to repeating the Australian survey, the Centre replicated the survey in New Zealand. Topics covered included  effectiveness, volumes, the principles guiding NZ aid, and political leadership.

Bio

Dr Terence Wood is a Research Fellow at the Development Policy Centre, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific. He heads the Development Policy Centre’s program of research into Australian and New Zealand aid. Terence’s research interests include aid policy, the politics of aid, and governance in developing countries. Prior to commencing PhD study Terence worked for the New Zealand government aid programme.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

The Power of Process Management in New Product Development (NPD)

Date: 23 March 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Kåre Sandvik, School of Business, University College of Southeast Norway

Background

Most companies attempt to use innovativeness as one of their strategic tools to succeed in markets. Many studies demonstrate how much NPD varies and how common and new success factors may explain why some companies succeed better than other does. The presentation gives a blend of state-of-the art research on market-oriented NPD success and include the results and "behind the scene" issues of Professor Sandvik's research during the last 20 years. His research has been with hotels and other travel sector industries. The presentation concludes with suggestions for implications for practice and future research.

Bio

Professor Kåre Sandvik has published in numerous journals, including the International Journal of Research in Marketing, Journal of Service Research, Journal of Tourism Futures, Journal of Travel Research, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Tourism Economics, International Journal of Advertising, Journal of Supply and Purchasing Management, and more. He won best overall paper awards at European Marketing Academy 1995, Norwegian Conference in Business Administration 1998, and 2003 Winter AMA.

He is currently the director of a new large grant research project, entitled "Developing Sources of Competitive Advantage in the Norwegian Travel Industry", a unique business performance research project that includes all of the largest companies and more than 60% of the sales in the industry. Dr Sandvik has an extensive record of strategy and marketing consulting with leading Northern European companies, many of them within the travel sector.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. No RSVP required, any queries please email: tourism@vuw.ac.nz.

Copyright, Libraries, New Zealand, and the World

Date: 22 March 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

The Asian Pacific Copyright Association (APCA), and the New Zealand Centre for International Economic Law (NZCIEL), cordially invite you to attend a Seminar presented by Adjunct Professor Kenneth D. Crews, attorney, author, and international copyright consultant.

Background

Copyright law in New Zealand and in nearly every country of the world is shaped directly by national obligations under multinational treaties and agreements. Right now, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is getting much attention, but for many years the Berne Convention and other agreements administered by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) have in fact had greatest influence. WIPO in recent years has taken deliberate steps to begin systematically addressing the matter of copyright exceptions, particularly for the needs of the visually impaired, for education, and for libraries and archives. WIPO commissioned Kenneth D. Crews to undertake worldwide studies of copyright exceptions for libraries and archives. Dr. Crews will be presenting some of those findings and reflecting on the law of New Zealand and other countries in the region. Questions will be welcome, and this will be an opportunity for exploring the relationship of copyright law to the needs of research, cultural preservation, and much more.

Bio

Kenneth D. Crews is an attorney, author, professor, and international copyright consultant. For more than twenty-five years, his research, policymaking, and teaching have centered on copyright issues of importance to education and research. He is the author of numerous books, articles, websites, and more. His first copyright book, Copyright, Fair Use, and the Challenge for Universities, reevaluated understandings of copyright and fair use at universities. A subsequent book, Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators (Third Edition, 2012), has been widely received as an insightful source for understanding copyright law.

Professor Crews established and directed the nation’s first university-based copyright office, at Indiana University, where he also held a tenured law professorship. He was later recruited to establish a similar office at Columbia University in New York City, and he currently serves on the faculty of Columbia Law School. Professor Crews recently returned to his home city of Los Angeles and has a law practice and consultancy based in Century City.

This is a free seminar, and light refreshments will be served from 5.15pm. For catering purposes kindly RSVP (acceptances only) by Friday, 18 March to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz or telephone 04 463 5550.

Do Police Arrestees Substitute Legal Highs for other Drugs

Date: 18 March 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 127

Speaker: Dr Chris Wilkins, Massey University, Auckland

Abstract

Some commentators have suggested legal highs (LH) might displace existing illegal drugs and thereby contribute to lower drug-related harm. However, no studies have specifically investigated substitution between LH and other drugs. We sought to explore the extent to which police detainees substitute LH for illegal drugs.

A total of 848 detainees were interviewed about their drug and LH use at four central police stations. Detainees were asked what impact their LH use had on their other drug use (i.e. ‘no change’, ‘more’, ‘less’ or ‘stopped’). The detainees were placed into four groups: (i) no LH use; (ii) LH use and ‘no change’ in drug use; (iii) LH use and ‘more’ drug use; (iv) LH use and ‘less’ or ‘stopped’ drug use. Demographics and levels of drug use in the past month were compared between groups.

Bio

Dr Chris Wilkins is a senior researcher and leader of the illegal drug research team at the SHORE & Whariki Research Centre, Massey University, New Zealand. Dr Wilkins has a doctorate in Economics and research expertise in monitoring drug trends, drug markets, and evaluating drug policy. He has completed a range of studies of NPS in New Zealand including studies of BZP ‘party pills’ and synthetic cannabinoids and the impact of policy intervention on these drugs. He played a central role in the development of the IDMS (Illicit Drug Monitoring System) and NZ-ADUM (New Zealand Arrestee Drug Use Monitoring system) and currently leads these studies.

Dr Wilkins has made presentations on New Zealand’s pre-market approval regulated legal market for ‘low risk’ NPS products in Rome at the ISSDP (International Society for the Study of Drug Policy) annual conference, and in Lisbon at the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) New Drug conference. He was also invited to present on New Zealand’s approach to NPS at the United Kingdom Home Office review of NPS laws.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Twitter Based Investor Recognition of Corporate Announcements

Date: 18 March 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway West Wing, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Roger Debrecency, Shidler College Distinguished Professor of Accounting, University of Hawaii

Abstract

This paper builds on Merton’s Investor Recognition Hypothesis (IRH) and employs user-generated Twitter interactions related to 8-K disclosures of unanticipated events by S&P 1500 companies to test the effects of investor recognition on market returns and liquidity of stocks. The Twitter-based IRH proxies are abnormal levels of tweets and abnormal sentiment. Abnormal levels of tweets are positively associated with both absolute value of cumulative abnormal returns and cumulative abnormal trading volume while abnormal sentiment plays a different role in affecting stock price or trading volume reactions. Effects of sentiment on cumulative abnormal returns and cumulative abnormal trading volume are accentuated when abnormal sentiment is negative.

This study provides evidence of the investor recognition processes and shows how such processes relate to market reactions to company announcements.

Bio

Roger Debrecency is the Shidler College Distinguished Professor of Accounting at the Shidler College of Business at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. He is the Senior Editor of the Journal of Information Systems, which is published by the Accounting Information Systems Section of the American Accounting Association. His research interests are primarily in Accounting Information Systems, IT Audit, IT Governance, and Internet-based Financial Reporting.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

CATGR Breakfast Seminar: Meeting User Expectations – Why NZ Entities Need to Adopt Integrated Reporting

Date: 16 March 2016

Time: 7.30 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

The Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research cordially invites you to a Business Links Panel Discussion.

Background

Users say corporate reporting is no longer fit for purpose – hence the call to New Zealand business for Integrated Reporting.  The panellists at this session will outline the benefits, the domestic and international progress, and propose actions for decision makers that might make Integrated Reporting more “top of mind”.

The key speaker is Paul Druckman, Chief Executive Officer of the International Integrated Reporting Council (IIRC), who is well known and respected in business and the accounting profession worldwide.

Following an entrepreneurial career in the software industry, Paul operated as a non‐executive chairman and director for a variety of companies. He is a former Director of the UK Financial Reporting Council, member of the City Takeover Panel, and President of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales. He has also chaired the Executive Board of Accounting for Sustainability, set up by the Prince of Wales.

Other panellists include:

  • Warren Allen, Chief Executive of the External Reporting Board and a former President of IFAC after serving as President from November 2012 to November 2014. He was also a partner at Ernst & Young.
  • Jane Diplock AO, Deputy Chairman and Lead Independent Director of the International Integrated Reporting Council Board, a Director of Singapore Exchange Limited and a Member of the Public Interest Oversight Board.
  • Mark Hucklesby, Grant Thornton’s National Technical Director with 20 years’ experience creating and interpreting or commenting on internationally recognised standards.
  • Ann Webster, Assistant Auditor-General, Research and Development in the Office of the Auditor-General. Ann has a long standing interest in public sector performance management and reporting.

This same seminar is being held later in the evening of 16th March, in Auckland - in conjunction with the University of Auckland Business School.

These Business Links Seminars are hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR).

The Changing Face of the GP Workforce: Results of the 2015 RNZCGP Workforce Survey

Date: 15 March 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT 4)

Speaker: Frances Townsend, Senior Policy Advisor, Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners

Background

The College of GPs conducts an annual electronic survey of its members. Nearly 2,500 responses to the 2015 survey were received, giving a response rate of 54% and providing valuable insights into the state of the GP workforce. Results revealed that among currently working respondents, 41% intended to retire in the next 10 years, 56% were aged 50 years or over and 53% were female. Information was also gathered on topics including practice ownership, vacancies, income, working hours, after hours commitments, and how likely members were to recommend a career in general practice. Female respondents earned less than their male colleagues and possible reasons for this difference will be discussed. In addition to the results of the 2015 RNZCGP survey, information from successive Medical Council Workforce Surveys will be presented to illustrate how the age profile of general practitioners became so skewed towards the older age groups and to illustrate the recent increase in the number of younger GPs.

Bio

Frances Townsend is a senior policy advisor with the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners. She graduated from Otago University with a medical degree in 1983, and went on to train as a general practitioner. She completed a Diploma in Public Health in 2003 and has worked for the Ministry of Health and for the past 10 years the College of General Practitioners on issues including the Health and General Practitioner workforce.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Unexpected Audit Fees: Effort or Risk?

Date: 11 March 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Stephen Taylor, University of Technology Sydney

Abstract

We provide evidence that distinguishes between competing production cost-based explanations of how to interpret unusually high (or low) audit fees. In contrast to prior research where audit fees are assumed to be independent from one year to the next, we argue that the inherent “stickiness” in audit fees also means that measures of unexpected fees will similarly be serially correlated. Our results strongly support this view, and suggest that unexpected audit fees reflect model misspecification in the “standard” audit fee model, attributable to aspects of risk that are not well captured at the client-firm level. Using an estimate of the extent to which unexpected fees differ from the recent past, we are able to distinguish between competing explanations of what unexpected audit fees capture. We show that a “jump” in unexpected fees is strongly associated with lower accounting quality, and this effect is stronger than for the recent level of unexpected fees. We then show that long run unexpected fees are also negatively associated with subsequent accounting quality, a result which contradicts the argument that higher unexpected audit fees capture increased effort and therefore reflect “investments in auditing”. Overall, our results suggest that risk, rather than effort, is a better explanation for higher audit production costs, and researchers should take great care in interpreting correlations between annual measures of unexpected audit fees and annual measures of accounting quality.

Bio

Stephen Taylor is Professor of Financial Accounting in the Business School at the University of Technology Sydney, where he was also Associate Dean-Research between 2009 and 2015. During 2016 Stephen is also the Australian Business Deans’ Council Research Scholar. Prior to joining UTS Stephen was Professor of Accounting at UNSW, where he also served as the Associate Dean-Research. His research has been widely published in leading journals and has attracted large ARC Grants (Discovery and Linkage). He is currently a Director of SIRCA Ltd and the Capital Markets Co-operative Research Centre (CMCRC), as well as being a member of the Advisory Council for the Centre of International Finance and Regulation (CIFR). He is an academic advisor to Plato Funds Management.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

The Effect of House Prices on Fertility: Evidence from Canada

Date: 4 March 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway West Wing, Level 1, RWW 125

Speaker: Associate Professor Jeremy Clark, University of Canterbury

Abstract

To the extent that families' fertility decisions respond to economic factors, the price of housing is an important and relatively neglected candidate for consideration in fertility decisions. In theory, the effect of changes in housing prices on family size will depend on the quantity of housing that a family already owns, and its elasticity of substitution between children and other "goods".  For renters, rises in rental costs associated with higher housing prices imply only a substitution effect that should reduce their likelihood of having additional children. Whereas home-owners are predicted to have more children in response to higher house prices if they have sufficient housing and low substitution, but fewer children otherwise. In this paper, we combine longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour Income and Dynamics (SLID) and average housing price data at real estate board (REB) level from the Canadian Real Estate Association to estimate the effect of house prices on fertility.

We follow non-moving women aged 18-40 (with their associated families) over time to ask whether changes in lagged housing price affects either total number of children, or the probability of a family having an additional birth. We differ from previous studies in employing person- rather than region-fixed effects, in covering both rural and urban areas, and in exploring the effect of housing price changes on total number of children vs. the probability of having an additional child.

For home owners using person fixed effects, we find that lagged REB housing prices are significantly positively associated with total number of children in the home, though not significantly positively associated with reporting a birth in the prior year. For renters, we find that lagged REB housing prices are not significantly negatively associated with either total or marginal fertility measures. Results are robust to varying the lag in house prices, and including a potentially endogenous proxy for size of residence.

Bio

Jeremy Clark is an associate professor in the Department of Economics and Finance at the University of Canterbury. He researches in areas of applied microeconomics, using empirical and experimental methods. Recent research has included examining the effect of socio-economic diversity on tax compliance in the United States and volunteering in New Zealand, the effectiveness of the school decile funding formula in New Zealand, and the effects of house prices on fertility in New Zealand and Canada. He teaches in development, experimental, and micro-economics.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Birth of a Child Life Event: Shaping the Future of Digital Public Services

Date: 4 March 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT 4) on Level 1

Speaker: Jeff Montgomery, Registrar-General and General Manager of Births, Deaths, Marriages, Citizenship, Authentications and Translations

Background

The vision for the future of government services is to centre it around the customer and not agencies. To this end, the Birth of a Child life event will deliver the first iteration of a customer-centric federated service that will enable New Zealanders to access the services they need for their baby. They will also be able to complete all their requirements around the birth of a child with government and non-government organisations from anywhere, using any device at any time of the day. Service will be delivered to the customer using digital identity founded on building a long-term relationship with government. The Department of Internal Affairs, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Social Development and Inland Revenue have partnered to deliver this cross agency initiative.

Bio

Jeff Montgomery is the Registrar-General and General Manager of Births, Deaths, Marriages, Citizenship, Authentications and Translations. This newly merged business unit works with all New Zealanders - and aspiring New Zealanders - to record key life events in ways that enable access to the services they are entitled to as citizens. Jeff's public service career has included delivering significant change for landlords and tenants, leaky home owners, and treaty settlement claimants.

Hosted by the Chair in Digital Government. All welcome; please register your interest at e-government@vuw.ac.nz, or phone the Chair administrator Lynn Barlow on 04 463 6966.

Incorporated Societies as an Organisational Form: Proposed Changes, Governance and Accounting Issues

Date: 24 February 2016

Time: 8.15 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

The Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research is pleased to invite you to Seminar 5 of its Not-for-Profit Seminar Series

The Incorporated Societies Act 1908 is to be updated with an Exposure Draft of the new Bill out for submissions. This will affect the large number of not-for-profit organisations who operate under it, and it is a good chance for organisations to review their governance structures in light of the proposed changes and also to input to the new Bill while it is still in draft stage.

In this seminar you will be given an overview of the key changes and hear from a panel of people who will be affected by these changes. It will cover:

  • An overview of the obligations under the proposed Incorporated Societies Bill
  • Committee members’ duties, resolution of disputes and conflicts of interest
  • Financial accounting obligations
  • Actions to take now and those for the near future
Speakers
  • Geoff Connor,Principal Advisor, Commerce, Consumers and Communications Branch, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment
  • Carolyn Cordery, Associate Professor, School of Accounting and Commercial Law, Victoria Business School
  • Peter Glensor, General Manager, Hui E!
  • Brent Kennerley, Partner, Grant Thornton
  • Geoff McLay, Professor, Victoria University Law School
  • John Page, Senior Advisor, Business Improvement, Sport New Zealand
  • Bill Rosenberg, Economist and Director of Policy, NZCTU
DocumentFile sizeFile type
Download the Not-for-Profit Seminar Series 2016 Flyer 400 KB PDF

This Business Links Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR). Contact vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz for further details.

Default, Mortgage Standards and Housing Liquidity

Date: 16 February 2016

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Reserve Bank of New Zealand, 8th Floor Phillips Room, 2 The Terrace, Wellington

Speaker: Associate Professor Amy Sun, Queen’s University, Canada

Abstract

The influence of households’ Indebtedness on their house-selling decisions is studied in a tractable dynamic general equilibrium model with housing market search and defaultable long-term mortgages. In equilibrium, sellers’ behaviour varies significantly with their indebtedness. Specifically, both asking prices and time-to-sell increase with the relative size of sellers' outstanding mortgages. In turn, the liquidity of the housing market associated with equilibrium time-to-sell determines the mortgage standards offered by competitive banks. When calibrated to the US economy the model generates, as observed, negative correlations over time between both house prices and time-to-sell with downpayment ratios.

Co-hosted by the School of Economics and Finance and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand. RSVP not required.

The Future of Public Sector Accounting: New Zealand's Role

Date: 3 February 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

The Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research and the External Reporting Board are pleased to invite you to a joint Business Links Seminar.

The Future of Public Sector Accounting – New Zealand’s Role is a presentation by Andreas Bergmann and Ian Carruthers, outgoing and incoming Chair of the International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board respectively, with a commentary by Ken Warren Chief Accounting Advisor, Budget and Macroeconomic Branch, The Treasury.

This free seminar will be followed by light refreshments 7.00-7.30pm.

For catering purposes kindly RSVP (acceptances only) by Wednesday 27 January 2016 to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz or telephone 04 463 5550.

"There Will Always be Paris?": Making Sense of COP21

Date: 2 February 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2 (GBLT2)

Speaker: Dr Adrian Macey, Senior Associate, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Background

IGPS attended the recent recent climate change summit in Paris under the leadership of Dr Adrian Macey, who will chair a public discussion on the meaning of the climate change agreement.

Along with other participants from COP21, this seminar will examine what the new climate change agreement means for the planet and New Zealand.

Panel speakers include:

  • Her Excellency Florence Jeanblanc-Risler, French Ambassador to NZ
  • Jo Tyndall, Climate Change Ambassador
  • John Carneige, Business New Zealand
  • Simon Hillier, Youth Delegate Professor
  • Dave Frame, Director of Climate Change Research Institute
Bio

Dr Adrian Macey was New Zealand’s first climate change ambassador, from 2006-2010, responsible for international climate change negotiations, coordination of international policy and domestic outreach.  In June 2010 he was elected Vice Chair of the UNFCCC Kyoto Protocol negotiations, and then served as Chair for 2011.

In his previous career with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade he served as Ambassador to France, OECD and Algeria, and Ambassador in Bangkok with responsibilities for Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. He was New Zealand’s Chief Trade Negotiator from 2000 to 2002.

At the IGPS, Dr Macey runs a roundtable series on climate change.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

The Paris Agreement on Climate Change: How New Zealand can up its game

Date: 27 January 2016

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Wise Response and the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies co-host this major discussion of the recent climate change summit in Paris.

There will be a panel discussion following the speakers' presentations. This will include a brief statement from the Wise Response Strategy Meeting, which is being held earlier in the day.

Speakers
  • Rt Hon Sir Geoffrey Palmer, QC
  • Alison Dewes, agribusiness consultant
  • Rod Oram, journalist and commentator
  • James Young-Drew, NZ youth delegation to Climate Change conference

Chair: Professor Jonathan Boston, School of Government, Victoria University

All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Government Competitiveness for the 21st Century: GC Ranks in 2015 and the Implications

Date: 21 January 2016

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Professor Tobin Im, Director of Center for Government Competitiveness, and Professor of Sociology, Graduate School of Public Administration, at Seoul University, Republic of Korea

Abstract

Despite a divergence in opinions about the role of the  government, many international organisations such as IMD and WEF report national competitiveness rankings using various approaches. While each ranking has established  its own methodological 'space', this lecture argues that the panoply of  competitiveness indices suffers from theoretical underdevelopment. Arising from  the post-Washington Consensus era, governance indices are limited by an  ideological approach that favors economic indicators, and advocate the  application of Western/developed country metrics to developing countries. A new  approach is needed.

The concept of Government Competitiveness (GC) introduced accounts  for a variety of factors overlooked by existing indices: the role of social organisations, the use of diverse inputs and varying internal activities (i.e.  conversion processes), and the imperative to address human needs at all stages of  development. This lecture challenges the blind use of 'governance', proposes a  novel approach to government competitiveness, and discusses the New Zealand  case.

Bio

Tobin Im is a  professor at the Graduate School of Public Administration at Seoul National University. He has recently conducted a research on 'Performance  Based Management: Comparing USA, China, and Korea' sponsored by Korea Research  Foundation.

He has published numerous  articles in world class academic journals such as ‘Does management Performance  Impact Citizen Satisfaction?’ in American Review of Public Administration, and many  books covering various aspects of public organisations. He has also served  as a consultant and advisor for many Korean government agencies over last 20 years. Professor Im is currently researching government competitiveness, and is President of Korean Association for Public Administration.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Auckland’s Growth: Infrastructure, Planning and Local Government Reform - 2

Date: 15 December 2015

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Auckland premises, 4th floor, 50 Kitchener Street, Auckland

Speakers: Nicholas Green (Principal Advisor, New Zealand Productivity Commission) & Stephen Selwood (Chief Executive, New Zealand Council on Infrastructure Development)

Background

Nicholas Green, Principal Advisor at the New Zealand Productivity Commission, will speak to the Commission’s discussion paper and their first principles review of New Zealand’s planning system. Is it fit for purpose?

Stephen Selwood, Chief Executive of the New Zealand Council on Infrastructure Development (NZCID) will discuss Local Government Reform: Evolution or Revolution?

About Nicholas Green

Nicholas Green is a principal advisor with the Productivity Commission currently working on the Urban planning inquiry. He previously worked on the Using land for housing and Regulatory institutions and practices inquiries. Prior to joining the Commission, Nicholas worked for a number of public sector and non-government organisations, including the New Zealand University Students’ Association, Business New Zealand, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and The Treasury.

About Stephen Selwood

Stephen Selwood is the Chief Executive of New Zealand’s peak infrastructure industry body, the New Zealand Council for Infrastructure Development. He is an expert on the infrastructure sector with a deep understanding of infrastructure governance, strategy, regulation, funding, delivery and management, having undertaken extensive research of infrastructure policy implementation and delivery within New Zealand and overseas. In August 2015 NZCID published a report on Local Government and Planning Law Reform.

Hosted by the School of Government to mark the establishment of the School of Government in Auckland. All welcome, RSVP acceptances to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Paid Parental Leave: Policy and Politics in Australia

Date: 11 December 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Marian Baird, University of Sydney

Abstract

The legacy of a strong and effective male breadwinner paradigm in Australian industrial relations has affected the way in which women’s interests are represented and responded to in the policy arena. This paper begins with the proposition that the Australian industrial relations system has an uncomfortably ambivalent relationship with women - especially women workers as mothers and carers - and that the ongoing tension between women and work and family is problematic for policy making. The paper then moves to policy developments, with a focus on the paid parental leave policy debates, including commentary on the positions of the three main industrial relations actors: government, employers and unions. The paper concludes with some options and speculation about future policy development in relation to women and work, in particular the option of making paid parental leave a National Employment Standard of the Fair Work Act rather than a welfare benefit in the social security portfolio.

Bio

Marian Baird is Professor of Employment Relations and Director of the Women Work Research Group in the University of Sydney Business School. She is co-editor of the Journal of Industrial Relations and on the editorial board of the Australian Bulletin of Labour and the international journal, Community, Work and Family. She is a Fellow of the University of Sydney Senate, a member of the Women's College Council and on the Research Committee of the Diversity Council of Australia.

Marian is one of Australia's leading researchers in the fields of women, work and family. She has received a number of Australian Research Council and federal and state government grants to study maternity and parental leave, flexibility for working parents, women and the global financial crisis, mature age workers and low paid workers, gender equitable organisational change and work and family in regional Australia.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Auckland’s Growth: Infrastructure, Planning and Local Government Reform - 1

Date: 3 December 2015

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Auckland premises, 4th floor, 50 Kitchener Street, Auckland

Speaker: Chris Parker, Chief Economist, Auckland Council

Background

Chris Parker, Chief Economist, Auckland Council will consider whether reforming infrastructure practices can help solve the housing affordability crisis in Auckland.

About Chris Parker

Chris Parker is Chief Economist at Auckland Council. A key role for Chris is to advise elected members, executive management and the public about the trade-offs of critical Auckland issues. Chris specialises in economic appraisal of policy, regulation and public investments. He has undertaken industry studies in residential construction and civil construction, and specialises in cost-benefit analysis of major infrastructure projects that change the evolution of cities.

Chris has recently authored an independent report for Auckland Council: Housing Supply, Choice and Affordability.

Hosted by the School of Government to mark the establishment of the School of Government in Auckland. All welcome, RSVP acceptances to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Community and Voluntary Sector Research Forum

Date: 24 November 2015

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 5, RWW 501

Speakers:
  • Madeline Sakofsky (Research Advisor at Volunteering New Zealand): "Volunteering New Zealand: State Of The Sector 2015"
  • Patricia Webster (Chair of the Community Work Training and Support Trust, Nelson): "Marketisation of Charities"
  • Lisa Marriott (Associate Professor of Taxation, School of Accounting and Commercial Law): "Crime Pays! Examining White-collar Crime in New Zealand"

A number of academics at Victoria University research in, and for, the community and voluntary sector, with many of our postgraduate students also researching in this area.

As well as networking within the University, this research is shared with the community through regular Community and Voluntary Sector Research (CVSR) Forums.

The forums run from 3.00-5.00pm, with tea and coffee available from 2.45pm, and are held in Railway West Wing 501 (use the Victoria University door on the left hand side of the Station, then take the first lift to the 5th floor or one of the other lifts to the 4th floor and walk up a flight of stairs).

General public are most welcome to attend these regular seminars.

Document File size File type
  CVSR Forum Flyer (November 2015)    450 KB PDF

Why Do Inventors Sell to Patent Trolls? Experimental Evidence for the Asymmetry Hypothesis

Date: 24 November 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Stephen Haber, Stanford University, US

Abstract

Why do individual patent holders assign their patents to "trolls" rather than license their technologies directly to manufacturers or assert them through litigation? We explore the hypothesis that an asymmetry in financial resources between individual patent holders and manufacturers prevents individuals from making a credible threat to litigate against infringement. First, individuals may not be able to cover the upfront costs associated with litigation. Second, unsuccessful litigation can result in legal fees so large as to bankrupt the individual. Therefore, a primary reason why individual patent holders sell to PAEs is that they offer insurance and liquidity. We test this hypothesis by experimentally manipulating these financial constraints on a representative sample of inventors and entrepreneurs affiliated with academic institutions that are particularly known for their innovative activity: Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley. We find that in the absence of these constraints, subjects were significantly less likely to sell their patent to a PAE in a hypothetical scenario. Furthermore, treatment effects were significant only for subjects who were hypothesized to be most sensitive to these constraints.

Bio

Stephen Haber is the A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor at Stanford University, where he holds appointments in the departments of Political Science, History, Economics and the Hoover Institution. He has spent his academic life investigating the political institutions and economic policies that delay innovation and improvements in living standards.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Where Does Liberty Thrive? Where Does Liberty Thrive? The Ecological Origins of Democracy and Autocracy

Date: 23 November 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Professor Stephen Haber is the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the A. A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University.

In addition, he is a professor of political science, professor of history, and professor of economics (by courtesy), as well as a senior fellow of both the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and the Stanford Center for International Development. Haber directs the Hoover Institution Working Group on Intellectual Property, Innovation, and Prosperity (IP2).

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Accounting Students and the Work-Study Balance

Date: 20 November 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Kate Wynn-Williams, University of Otago

Abstract

The background to this paper reflects student claims about increasing pressure to seek some level of paid employment during their undergraduate degrees, some to support their educational costs and some to gain work experience. Financial constraints may be playing an increasingly significant part on student life-styles, with more than 700,000 students carrying debt from outstanding student loans (Student Loan Scheme, 2013). While some students indicate they seek employment only during the summer holidays, or of an occasional nature, others describe the challenges of balancing nearly full-time jobs with nearly full-time study programmes. It is also the case that students are often busy with other extra-curricular activities, often requiring absence or special consideration with respect to study commitments. A limited range of prior research has been found in the field of accounting education that relates academic performance to non-academic influences.

This empirical study does just that, providing insights into the learning environment due to time pressure from outside commitments. The research question investigates the impact of a range of extra-curricular commitments on academic success (as measured by course grades) and student perceptions regarding the degree to which work commitments interfere with their studies. Statistical analysis of a survey conducted in an intermediate-level financial accounting class shows that the number of hours of paid employment is not statistically significant. However, the impact of paid employment does show statistically significant results. Suggestions are made regarding coping mechanisms and how some students successfully balance work and study in an increasingly competitive student environment.

Bio

Dr Wynn-Williams gained her BA (Philosophy) in 1974, followed by qualifications as a registered nurse. Later, commerce and accounting studies led to a BCom (Accounting) and a teaching position within the department in 1994. She finished her PhD in 1999. Dr Wynn-Williams is now a senior lecturer, teaching across the levels in both management and financial accounting. She is convenor for ACCT 102, ACCT 211.

Dr Wynn-Williams is also Associate Dean Academic for the Otago Business School.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

The Lesser of Two Evils: Double Tax Treaty Override or Treaty Abuse?

Date: 13 November 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Craig Elliffe, University of Auckland

Abstract

On a coordinated basis the OECD and G20 are focusing on a far-reaching action plan to combat base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS). Their plans are designed to prevent treaty abuse, foil hybrid mismatches, prevent unusual and aggressive transfer pricing, and encourage much more timely and comprehensive information sharing. This group are also continuing to work on the broader tax challenges of the digital economy considering issues of nexus, data, and characterisation with a view to designing a fair and viable system designed to tax profits in the jurisdiction where economic activities occur and where value is created. There is great uncertainty about what income arises from the digital economy and also how it could be assessed and paid. How should a government respond when it believes that a multinational (such as Google) operating in its country uses the substantive provisions of a double tax agreement to pay virtually no tax in its jurisdiction? While the world awaits an integrated solution, a second level of governmental response to BEPS is emerging and involves purely domestic taxation legislation introduced on a unilateral basis. This is not coordinated and it is controversial because, arguably, it is designed in some circumstances to override existing treaty obligations.

The 1989 OECD Report on treaty override categorised various situations of treaty override as acceptable and unacceptable behaviour for governments. In that Report the OECD discussed a case of treaty abuse involving the alienation of immovable property. They concluded that even though the new overriding legislation was designed to put an end to an improper use of the tax treaty it was an impermissible contravention of a tax treaty obligation. This paper argues that in such circumstances, now, a domestic law treaty override is both a justified and acceptable course of action. This view is based upon three key arguments. The first is that the purpose of tax treaties has changed from when the Report was written so that it is now clear that it is a main purpose of the treaty to prevent tax avoidance and evasion. Secondly, domestic law already overrides treaties in situations of abuse. It has emerged since 1989 that domestic general anti-avoidance rules influence and affect double tax agreements in the vast majority of countries. Thirdly, as a matter of international law it can be argued that a taxpayer should not be able to take advantage of a treaty in an abusive way in which their own state could not. The state is required to apply the treaty in good faith and so should the taxpayer.

Seen in this light recent developments made by the United Kingdom and Australia involving new tax rules appear reasonable rather than unreasonable even if the developments are examples of unilateral legislative treaty override (which the UK and Australia would contest). The approach in these jurisdictions, being grounded in preventing abusive structure and transactions, is consistent with the purpose of double tax treaties.

Bio

Professor Craig Elliffe (LLB(Hons), BCom Otago, LLM Camb) was appointed to a chair after 14 years as a tax partner at KPMG and nine years as a tax partner at Chapman Tripp. Craig’s research areas are in the field of international tax, corporate tax and tax avoidance, and he is the author of International and Cross-Border Taxation in New Zealand (Thomson Reuters), Dividend Imputation: Practice and Procedure (Lexis), and has written numerous articles and other materials on tax. He is listed in Chambers and the International Tax Review as a leading tax practitioner, and is the Director of the MTaxS programme (the leading postgraduate tax course in New Zealand).

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Determinants of Regulatory Responses to Risks from Financial Innovation: Survey Evidence from G20

Date: 23 October 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Ivan Diaz-Rainey, Senior Lecturer in Finance, Department of Accountancy and Finance, University of Otago

Abstract

We explore the factors that shape the extent and scope of the response of G20 countries to a Financial Stability Board (FSB) recommendation aimed at mitigating the risks from financial innovation. Using a formal content analysis of the FSB’s Implementation Monitoring Network Surveys, we develop an index of disclosed strength of regulatory responses. We find that G20 countries have displayed large interpretive differences, little forward planning and have emphasised regulatory capabilities over firm capabilities when addressing the recommendation. Countries with strong central banks, more concentrated regulatory structures and bank-based financial systems responded more robustly, while countries with a large financial sector were marginally associated with a weaker response. The latter suggests that financial sector lobbying has weakened regulatory responses.

Bio

Dr Ivan Diaz-Rainey is a Senior Lecturer in Finance at the Department of Accountancy and Finance, University of Otago, New Zealand. He has previously held academic positions at the University of East Anglia (UK), the European University Institute (Florence, Italy) and the Higher Colleges of Technology (Abu Dhabi). Prior to moving into academia he worked in a variety of investment and finance roles in the City of London. He is a member of the International Association for Energy Economics and the CFA Institute. He has previously conducted research, policy and consultancy work for a number of organisations, including the OECD, E.ON UK plc and the European Capital Markets Institute. His current research interests include; financial innovation, commodity markets and carbon finance. He is Managing Guest Editor of a 2015 Special Issue of Technological Forecasting and Social Change on "The technological transformation of capital markets".

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

"All in the Mind?" The Metaphysics of Intellectual Property Law

Date: 23 October 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Alexandra George, University of New South Wales

Abstract

Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that deals with what something is and the nature of its existence. It helps to explain the world in which humans live, and it helps to underpin human interpretations and applications of knowledge. In his famous 19th Century reference to the seeming evanescence found in some of intellectual property law’s prominent doctrines, Justice Story signalled the importance of metaphysics to an understanding of this area of law. That is, without a philosophical appreciation of how the law is constructed and what it consists of, the law of patents and copyright — and also of trademarks, designs and other intellectual property doctrines — can be very difficult to understand or use effectively. Without mindfulness of its metaphysics, the law risks incoherence and internal inconsistencies.

Applied to intellectual property law, metaphysics considers the nature and form of intellectual property and the essence of its constituent parts. It looks at how intellectual property exists, the shape it takes, and the constitutive properties of intellectual property laws. In a sense, metaphysics asks "what is special about intellectual property law?” or “what gives intellectual property law a distinct identity?" Particular discussions about how to answer these sorts of metaphysical or ontological questions may include reference to the imaginary nature of intellectual property objects, the way in which intellectual property objects are constructed by legal concepts, the typical structure of intellectual property doctrines, and familial characteristics of intellectual property laws. Metaphysics’ concern with what ‘intellectual property’ is contrasts with other philosophical methods found in the jurisprudence of intellectual property, such as epistemological explorations of the justifiability of beliefs about intellectual property; political philosophy explorations of the role of intellectual property law — and its concomitant rights — in mediating between the individual and society; or normative explorations of how intellectual property laws can be implemented to reflect underlying moral or political values.

In outlining a metaphysical approach to the study of intellectual property law, this paper considers the nature of intellectual property from various perspectives. First, it surveys common approaches to the definition of ‘intellectual property’, and explains why they are metaphysically unsatisfactory. Second, it examines the ‘imaginary’, legally-constructed nature of both intellectual property laws and the objects they regulate. Third, it takes a structural approach to examine the constituent properties that are typically used by the law to build intellectual property doctrines. Fourth, it suggests that — as the term ‘intellectual property’ is used in ways that tend to embrace legal doctrines falling outside the typical structural framework — a useful method of exploring the metaphysics of this area of law may be to adopt a contextual approach or a ‘family resemblance’ approach to explain what intellectual property is and the nature of its existence. Finally, it closes with an exploration of challenges to the intellectual property law framework that are emerging in the face of advances such as the advent of 3D printing, cyborgs and other disruptive technologies.

Bio

Dr Alexandra George joined the UNSW Law Faculty in 2007, having had earlier academic appointments at Queen Mary, University of London, the University of Wales, Swansea and the University of Exeter in the UK. She has also worked at the European University Institute, Florence, Italy and at the University of Sydney, has practised as an intellectual property and media lawyer, was Associate to Justice MF Moore in the Federal Court of Australia and the Industrial Relations Court of Australia, and worked in journalism at Reuters.

Alexandra is particularly interested in the philosophy of intellectual property law, and globalisation and intellectual property. Her publications examine issues such as the metaphysics and structure of intellectual property law, ‘property’ in and the commodification of intangible objects, and the communicative effects of intellectual property law. She also writes on the role of intellectual property in the globalisation process, and practical issues in intellectual property enforcement.

Her book Constructing Intellectual Property (Cambridge University Press, 2012) examines the ways in which the legal system defines into existence and regulates intellectual property. By analyzing the metaphysical structure of intellectual property law and the concepts the legal system uses to construct 'intellectual property', the book helps to explain the role of intellectual property from a structural — rather than the traditional normative -- perspective. Alexandra has received the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence at UNSW.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

The Impact of Life Events on the Tourism Behaviour of Senior Citizens

Date: 21 October 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Dominik Huber, Tourism Management Group, Victoria University

Abstract

The senior market is a driving force in the tourism industry and one of the fastest growing market segments. Demographic changes, and the evolving travel routines of those people reaching senior age, suggest enormous potential for the tourism industry. Even though tourism scholars recognise the importance of this subject, seniors' tourism behaviour remains a relatively under-researched topic in the field. The underpinning rationale behind this thesis is that the life courses of seniors are shaped by meaningful transitions such as deteriorating physical health, changes in family structure and social roles. The aim of the thesis is to identify relevant life events, to investigate how they impact on seniors' tourism behaviour, and to get an in-depth understanding of the meanings behind this phenomenon.

The thesis is based on qualitative research and results in a senior tourism behaviour model which integrates leisure-constraints approaches and the fundamentals of ecological systems theory. The thesis demonstrates that life events operate on different constraint and facilitator levels, reflecting the complexity of their impact on tourism behaviour.

Bio

Dominik Huber joined the Tourism Management Group at Victoria University in 2015 as a contract lecturer at the School of Management. He arrived in New Zealand in 2011 to start his PhD thesis at Auckland University of Technology: "The impact of life events on the tourism behaviour of senior citizens in Freising, Germany". Dominik was awarded with the Vice Chancellor Scholarship and Graduate Assistantship Award at AUT and graduated in December 2014. Before Dominik moved to New Zealand he worked in different fields related to geography and tourism including urban planning, tourism and energy consulting, and land surveying in Germany and Switzerland.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Surprised by the Gambler's and Hot Hand Fallacies? A Truth in the Law of Small Numbers

Date: 16 October 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Adam Sanjurjo, Assistant Professor, University of Alicante, Spain

Abstract

We find a subtle but substantial bias in a standard measure of the conditional dependence of present outcomes on streaks of past outcomes in sequential data. The underlying mechanism is a form of selection bias, which causes the empirical (conditional) probability to underestimate the true conditional probability of a given outcome, when conditioning on prior outcomes of the same kind. The biased measure has been used prominently in the literature that investigates incorrect beliefs in sequential decision making – most notably the Gambler's Fallacy and the Hot Hand Fallacy. Upon correcting for the bias, the conclusions of some prominent studies in the literature are reversed. The bias also provides a structural explanation of why the belief in the law of small numbers persists, as repeated experience with finite sequences can only reinforce these beliefs, on average.

(Joint with Joshua B. Miller)

Bio

Dr Adam Sanjurjo is originally from Northern California, and went to college at UCSB, where he studied economics and mathematics. After working for two years as a research assistant in the Trading Risk Analysis group of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, he completed a PhD in Economics at UCSD. Adam's research areas were behavioral/cognitive, experimental, and theory, and his dissertation was about decision making under cognitive load, primarily in the context of multiple attribute search. His most recent research focuses on decision making based on sequential data.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Meeting User Expectations: Why NZ Entities Need To Now Adopt Integrated Reporting

Date: 15 October 2015

Time: 5.15 pm

Venue: Level 15 of Grant Thornton House, 215 Lambton Quay, Wellington

The Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research cordially invites you to a Business Links Panel Discussion.

Background

Users say corporate reporting is no longer fit for purpose – hence the call to New Zealand business for Integrated Reporting. The panellists at this session will outline the benefits, progress to date (both domestic and international) and also propose some future actions for decision makers that might make Integrated Reporting more "top of mind".

Panellists include:

  • Ann Webster, Assistant Auditor-General, Research and Development in the Office of the Auditor-General
  • Jane Diplock, a Director of the International Integrated Reporting Council Board
  • Mark Hucklesby, Grant Thornton’s National Technical Director
  • Warren Allen, immediate Past President of IFAC

This Business Links Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR). It will be followed by light refreshments; attendance is free but places are limited, so RSVP (attendance only) to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz by Friday 9 October.

Using Categories in Health Care Decision Making: The Household, the Consultation Room, and the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting

Date: 15 October 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Kevin Dew, Professor of Sociology, School of Social and Cultural Studies, Victoria University

Abstract

This presentation explores different ways in which category work is a resource for patients and health professionals to justify actions in different spaces. It draws together material from three research programmes, each with a different 'spatial' focus: the household, the consultation room and the multidisciplinary team meeting. Decision making around health interventions was explored through the categorisation work that takes place in these spaces. The household research identified the household as a centre of knowledge production that subverts, manipulates or aligns with expert systems. Fixed and stable expert knowledge becomes flexible and hybridised inside the home. The consultation room research identified a number of interactional elements in talk about side effects and talk about unorthodox interventions that attempt to stabilise the categories used by health experts. The multidisciplinary team meeting research identified different forms of authority that are called upon in hospital-based cancer care meetings, where health professionals mix scientific understandings with other ways of knowing in determining treatment options.

Bio

Kevin Dew is Professor of Sociology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is a founding member of the Applied Research on Communication in Health (ARCH) group. Current research activities include studies of interactions between health professionals and patients, cancer care decision-making in relation to health inequities and the social meanings of medications.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

A Principled Framework for Assessing General Anti-Avoidance Regimes

Date: 9 October 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Kerrie Sadiq, Queensland University of Technology

Abstract

The enactment of general anti-avoidance regimes (GAARs) in domestic legislation, along with the analysis of those regimes, is well documented. Academic studies generally focus on an analysis of the introduction and subsequent interpretation and application of GAARs in jurisdictions such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, China and India. However, a review of current literature reveals that different academics evaluate GAARs based on different sets of criteria. This results in an absence of a common theoretical framework to assess the effectiveness of existing and proposed GAARs. Further, it is difficult to undertake a comparative analysis of GAARs as a lack of a common normative framework decreases the ability and robustness of a comparison of findings. This article develops a normative framework to assess GAARs by adopting a systematic analysis of relevant academic articles published since 2000. Thirty-eight articles were included in the study with each coded to ascertain common themes. This allowed categories of quotations to be determined and a structured theoretical framework to be developed.

The article concludes that the resulting framework highlights five principles relating to the structure and evaluation of GAARs: purposive and objective interpretation, a proactive stance, discretion, certainty, and the ability to alter liability. Each of these principles is discussed and, in doing so, this article fills a gap in the current literature by developing a principled framework to help ensure that future studies evaluate GAARs from a single point of view.

Bio

Kerrie Sadiq is a Professor of Taxation in the School of Accountancy at the QUT Business School, Queensland University of Technology, an Adjunct Research Fellow of the Taxation Law and Policy Research Group, Monash University and a Senior Tax Adviser to the Tax Justice Network (UK). She holds a Bachelor of Commerce (B Com) from The University of Queensland, a Bachelor of Laws (Honours) (LLB Hons) from The University of Queensland, a Master of Laws (LLM) from Queensland University of Technology, and a PhD from Deakin University.  Kerrie is a Chartered Tax Adviser as designated by the Taxation Institute of Australia.

Kerrie primarily researches in international tax, tax expenditures and capital gains tax. She is author of numerous publications in both Australian and International journals and edited books and is a co-author of taxation texts. Kerrie is often cited in the media in relation to international tax issues and regularly receives invitations to speak on contemporary tax topics. Recent work has been specifically on issues in international tax, such as transfer pricing, the OECD’s approach to base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS), Australia’s role in the G20 and the BEPS project, and automatic exchange of tax information. In 2014-15, Kerrie wrote balanced articles on BEPS for The Conversation, as well as writing and presenting findings for the Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) and appearing before the 2015 Senate Inquiry into Corporate Tax Avoidance. Prior to joining Queensland University of Technology, Kerrie spent 20 years at The University of Queensland, as a member of both their Law School and Business School.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Understanding the Perceived Destination Image of New Zealand as Revealed in Travel Blogs written by Mainland Chinese Tourists

Date: 7 October 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 2, RWW 223

Speaker: Janet Tang, Master in Tourism Management graduate

Presentation

This presentation will discuss the overall perceived destination image of New Zealand which has been revealed through the analysis of 139 blog entries written by 36 Chinese bloggers. Topics of discussion will include the activities and attractions Chinese participate in, positive and negative perceptions of New Zealand, and their response to familiar and unfamiliar encounters. This presentation will also highlight how influential these Chinese bloggers are and how their advice is considered a valuable information source for Chinese consumers considering travelling to New Zealand.

About the presenter

Having just completed her Masters in Tourism Management at Victoria University, Janet is currently seeking career opportunities where she can apply her knowledge and skills. For the past 18 months Janet has also worked as an intern at the Tourism Industry Association New Zealand, assisting on a variety of projects and gaining valuable tourism industry experience.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Addressing Disadvantage: Key Messages from the Productivity Commission Report on 'More Effective Social Services'

Date: 1 October 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speakers: James Soligo and Dave Heatley, Principal Advisors, Productivity Commission

Background

Social services help New Zealanders to live healthy, safe and fulfilling lives. They provide access to health services and education opportunities, and protect and support the most vulnerable. The quality of these services and their accessibility for those in need are crucial to the ongoing wellbeing of New Zealanders.

In June 2014, the government asked the Productivity Commission to look at ways to improve outcomes from government-funded social services. The Commission recently released its final report title More Effective Social Services.

The report has two key messages. First, system-wide improvement can be achieved and should be pursued. Second, New Zealand needs better ways to join up services for those with multiple, complex needs. Capable clients should be empowered with more control over the services they receive. Those less capable need close support and a response tailored to their needs, without arbitrary distinctions between services and funds divided into "health", "education", etc. The Commission’s report explains the weaknesses in the current system, and makes recommendations about how to make social services more responsive, client-focused, accountable and innovative.

About the presenters

James Soligo and Dave Heatley are Principal Advisors at the Productivity Commission and have spent the past 14 months deeply involved in the More Effective Social Services inquiry.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Learning in Network Games

Date: 1 October 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11 Meeting Room, RH1113

Speaker: Dr Jaromír Kovářík, Assistant Professor, University of the Basque Country, Czech Republic

Abstract

We report the findings of an experiment designed to study how people learn in network games. Network games offer new opportunities to identify learning rules, since on networks (compared to e.g. random matching) more rules differ in terms of their information requirements. Our experimental design enables us to observe both which actions participants choose and which information they consult before making their choices. We use this information to estimate learning types using finite mixture models. There is substantial heterogeneity in learning types. However, the vast majority of our participants' decisions are best characterized by reinforcement learning or (myopic) best-response learning. We also find that participants in more complex situations (with more network neighbours) tend to resort to simpler rules more often than others.

Bio

Jaromír Kovářík has been a Researcher at the Economics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic since March 2014. Since 2008, he is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department I of the University of the Basque Country. He holds a PhD in Quantitative Economics from the Economics Department of the University of Alicante (2008). His research looks at: Social networks, (behavioural and evolutionary) game theory, learning, experimental economics, social norms (all the topics both theoretically and empirically).

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Dynamics of Price Discovery: Evidence from Canadian-US Cross-listed Firms

Date: 25 September 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Ivan Indriawan, Research Fellow, Auckland University of Technology

Abstract

This paper studies the dynamics of price discovery for a large sample of Canadian companies cross-listed on the New York Stock Exchange from January 2004 to January 2011. Using daily measures of price discovery, we model the interactions between daily price discovery measures, trading volume, bid-ask spread, and algorithmic trading activity using a vector autoregression (VAR), taking into account lagged and contemporaneous relations among the variables.

We observe that over time, the US market is gaining dominance in terms of price discovery. Improvements in liquidity increase an exchange’s contribution to price discovery, while at the same time, an increase in price discovery leads to better liquidity. We also find that algorithmic trading activity is negatively related to price discovery of cross-listed stocks, which we attribute to the crowding out effect as arbitrageurs make use of computers to compete for arbitrage opportunity. As a consequence, high-frequency trading by these arbitrageurs pushes away informed investors, who are disadvantaged in terms of speed. We conjecture that the increasing dominance of the U.S. market is related to improvements in liquidity of US market relative to Canada, especially after the adoption of regulation NMS in the US.

Bio

Ivan Indriawan is a Research Fellow at the Auckland Center for Financial Research, Auckland University of Technology. He is currently nearing completion of PhD under the supervision of Professor Bart Frijns, and Professor Alireza Tourani-Rad. His thesis combines a focus on macroeconomic news announcements and underlying market microstructure theory that drives prices of stocks listed in multiple markets.

His research interests include: Market Microstructure, Financial Markets, Macroeconomic News Announcements, and Applied Econometrics. His work has been published in the Journal of Banking and Finance and the Journal of Empirical Finance.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Value of the Cruise Sector to NZ's Economy and Forecasts

Date: 23 September 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Raewyn Tan, General Manager of Cruise New Zealand

Presentation

In the absence of official measurement and value, despite being the equivalent of New Zealand's 3rd largest inbound source of holiday arrivals, Cruise New Zealand undertakes these analyses on its own. This presentation will discuss the size and economic value of the cruise sector to New Zealand as published in Cruise New Zealand's recently released economic impact report for 14/15 cruise season, and will also outline forecasts and its influencing factors.

Bio

Currently General Manager of Cruise New Zealand, Raewyn joined the sector in 2008 when she joined Tourism New Zealand in the then newly created role of Cruise Market Development Manager. Prior to that, she was in the international marketing team at Positively Wellington Tourism and was Research Fellow at Victoria University on the FRST-funded "Tourism Distribution Channels" project. Raewyn is passionate about the cruise sector and enjoys using her research and destination marketing skills in this lobbyist role at Cruise New Zealand.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Trading on our Reputation: Integrity and its Importance to NZ's Tourism Sector

Date: 22 September 2015

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speakers: Al Morrison (Deputy State Services Commissioner) & Michael Baines (CE, Motel Association of New Zealand). This discussion will be moderated by Mark Sainsbury.

Background

Integrity is an essential component of New Zealand's reputation. During the discussion we look at what integrity means and how the measures of integrity are broadening and becoming increasingly demanding.

We then turn our focus to the tourism sector - exactly what is the importance of integrity to our tourism sector?

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Transparency International New Zealand. All welcome, RSVP attendance to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Competitive Cross-Subsidization

Date: 18 September 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Zhijun Chen, Senior Lecturer, University of Auckland

Abstract

This paper analyses competitive pricing by multiproduct firms facing consumers with heterogeneous shopping patterns. We show that cross-subsidization arises when overall equally efficient firms have comparative advantages over different products. Competing multiproduct firms are substitutes for one-stop shoppers but they are complements for multi-stop shoppers. Thus, competition for one-stop shoppers drives total prices down to cost, but firms earn a profit from multi-stop shoppers on their strong products, and price weak products below cost. Banning below-cost pricing leads to higher profits at the expense of higher prices for one-stop shoppers, but it can either reduce or increase consumer surplus and total welfare, it thus calls for cautious regulations on below-cost pricing in competitive markets.

Bio

Dr Zhijun Chen is a senior lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of Auckland. He was awarded the PhD of Economics from Toulouse School of Economics in 2006 and the PhD of Management Science from Wuhan University in 2002.

Before joining the University of Auckland, Dr Chen was appointed the Associate Professor in Zhejiang University, the post-doctoral research fellow at the Centre for Competition Policy in the University of East Anglia, and the Marie-Curie Research Fellow in Ecole Polytechnique.

His main research interests are Industrial Organisation, Competition Policy and Applied Microeconomics, and his research papers are published in leading economics journals including the American Economic Review, the Rand Journal of Economics and Journal of Law and Economics.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Imagining Intelligible Accounting for the Future: A Critical Examination of (dis)placement in the Pacific Islands

Date: 18 September 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Stephanie Perkiss, Macquarie University

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine contemporary accountability relationships for challenging and future issues of displacement and to imagine broader ways of being accountable. Design/methodology/approach: The paper explores the meaning and understanding of place and displacement and, with sociology of worth, provides discussion for greater accountability. A SOW framework is anchored to the 'local' Pacific Island case/situation to give critical examination of forward-looking displacement.

There is need to challenge both current modes of economic and sustainability accounting and accountability to give better consideration to complex social phenomena. Intelligible accounts are examined as a way of providing greater moral accountability and drive to a just society. These accounts, tested in the Pacific Island SOW case study analyses produce a narrative of complex and conflicting states of worth and accountability relationships in relation to forward-looking issues of displacement. They also provide hope for accounting for future generations through critical accounting research.

Bio

Dr Stephanie Perkiss is a lecturer of accounting at Macquarie University, and joined the Department of Accounting and Corporate Governance in 2015 after completing a PhD at UOW. Prior to academia, Stephanie worked as a professional accountant.

Dr Perkiss is currently involved in research projects that focus on accounting and accountability for current and future issues of displacement, including the predicted displacement caused by sea level rise. Her research approach is interdisciplinary and appeals to multiple theories and methodologies, such as sociology of worth, critical social theory, moral philosophy and an understanding of the consequences of globalisation. This research aims to address the challenges of displacement that remain unaccounted for in traditional/modern accounting frameworks.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Law and Economics of Disasters and Taxation

Date: 16 September 2015

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Level 3 Moot Room (GB 340)

Speaker: Professor Satoshi Watanabe, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

Background

Professor Satoshi Watanabe will talk about the relationship between the Japanese tax system and natural disasters, applying insights from the law and economics theory on tort (or accident) law to policy issues relating to natural disasters.

He has previously written an article entitled "Natural Disasters and Taxation", dividing taxation measures in response to a disaster into those that might be taken prior (providing incentives for disaster prevention and preparedness activities) and subsequent (economic relief for disaster victims) to a disaster. Inevitably, there exist contradictory aspects between the two, namely that an advance promise of subsequent economic relief might reduce the effort applied to prior disaster preparedness measures. Further, although prior measures are policies related to the distribution of resources, subsequent measures are policies related to the distribution of income.

In this presentation Professor Watanabe asks whether it is possible to avoid taking a view divided by prior and subsequent measures, or by resource and income distribution, and instead to think about the relationship between natural disasters and taxation from a more unified policy perspective. He will propose thinking about policy responses to natural disasters from the point of view of a criterion of "minimizing the total social cost of disasters". Tax system measures, measures relating to annual expenditure, what should happen about insurance, etc., will then be considered in as unified a policy framework as possible.

Bio

Professor Satoshi Watanabe joined the Ministry of Finance in Japan following the award of his Bachelor of Economics degree from the University of Tokyo in 1980. By 1985 he had obtained a PhD in Economics from Princeton University. He then worked as an economist in the Asian Department of the IMF, in the Ministry of Finance and in the Japanese diplomatic corps. From 1999-2001, he was Vice Chair, Working Party 9 of the OECD Committee on Fiscal Affairs and also the co-chair of the OECD Consumption Tax Technical Advisory Group. He was appointed to a Chair in 2002 and was also the Director of the Research Department of the Policy Research Institute of the Ministry of Finance in Japan.

Professor Watanabe's fields of specialisation are Taxation, Public Finance, and Law and Economics. His present research themes are Tax Policy, Tax Strategy and Tax Laws.

This Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR). Attendance is free but places are limited, so RSVP (attendance only) to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz by Friday 11 September.

Positive and Negative CEO Personality Traits and Firm Communication: Overconfidence, Narcissism or Self-Esteem?

Date: 11 September 2015

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: A/Prof Encarna Guillamon-Saorin, University Carlos III de Madrid, Spain

Abstract

We propose a novel approach based on graphology analysis to identify self-esteem and narcissism and investigate how thesetraits influence firm communication. We view self-esteem as a positive trait, reflecting a strong self-concept built on a true sense of self-confidence. Narcissism, however, is a negative trait, associated with a more fragile self-view reflected by demonstrations of grandiosity and arrogance. We hypothesise that these traits lead to differential communication styles.

We predict CEOs with high self-esteem will provide informative disclosures. Conversely, narcissistic CEOs will bias disclosureto justify their performance, using communication as a mechanism of self-defence and preservation of their self-esteem. The results confirm these predictions. High self-esteem CEOs show lower attributional biases, disclose more information and use less positive tone. However, narcissistic CEOs are more likely to show attributional biases and link any firm underperformance to external causes, whilst attributing positive outcomes to their own merits.

Bio

Dr Encarna Guillamon-Saorin is assistant professor in the Department of Business Administration at University Carlos III de Madrid. She has a degree in Personnel Management, a BA (Hons) Business in Europe at Manchester Metropolitan University, and completed a PhD at UCD Michael Smurfit School of Business in Dublin (Ireland). Her main research interest is in the area of financial reporting, in particular managing disclosure strategies focusing on impression management and bias in voluntary disclosures in an international context.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law.  RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Homeownership and Labour Market Flexibility: New Spatial-Econometric Evidence for New Zealand

Date: 11 September 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr William Cochrane, Associate Researcher, National Institute of Demographic and Economic Analysis, University of Waikato

Abstract

The proportion of New Zealand households living in owner-occupied dwellings has declined markedly since the early 1990s. The long-run rate of unemployment declined as well, at least until the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2008. Research initiated by Andrew Oswald, and recently extended jointly with David Blanchflower, suggests that these two trends are linked and that the causality runs from high homeownership to high unemployment. An extensive theoretical and empirical literature on this hypothesis exists internationally but there is no consensus. Using spatial econometric panel models and New Zealand census data from 1986 until 2006, Cochrane and Poot (2007) provide evidence in favour of the Oswald-Blanchflower hypothesis, finding that the homeownership rate has a statistically significant positive effect on the unemployment rate of a labour market area.

This paper seeks to extend this previous work in three ways. Firstly, we re-estimate the model using a spatial econometric approach suggested by Lesage and Pace (2009) that allows us to distinguish between direct and indirect spatial effects. Secondly, following Baert et al. (2013) we disaggregate homeownership into freehold and mortgaged homes. Thirdly, we add data from the 2013 census, which still reflects the growth in unemployment since the GFC. Our prior is that all three extensions are likely to modify or even challenge the previous findings.

Bio

Dr Bill Cochrane was a Research Fellow in the Population Studies Centre from 2002-2010, and continues in the National Institute of Demographic and Economic Analysis as an Associate Researcher. He is involved in the provision of a wide range of consultancy services to local authorities, district health boards and various NGO's in the areas of population projection and labour market analysis.

He gained his PhD from the University of Waikato in 2011 researching regional diversity and local labour market outcomes in New Zealand.

Dr Cochrane's research interests lie in Labour Economics. He specialises in the econometric analysis of local labour markets, spatial econometric analysis, evaluation of policy particularly in relation to the labour market and social security system, labour market and small area demographic projections; as well as analysis of the organisation of work and workplace productivity.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Agony and Ecstasy of Operating NZ’s First Integrated Regional Development Agency

Date: 9 September 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Stuart Trundle, CEO of the Venture Taranaki Trust

Background

Stuart oversaw the formation of the first regional agency to combine the responsibilities of an economic development agency, a regional tourism organisation, a film commission and a major events attraction team. He will give personal insights of the successes and failures from his experiences directing regional and national economic strategies in the UK, Poland, Romania and Taranaki whilst managing the creative tensions of multiple funding relationships with territorial local authorities, central government and the private sector.

Bio

Stuart Trundle is the chief executive of Venture Taranaki Trust, the regional development agency for Taranaki regarded as one of the leading models for economic development in New Zealand. Stuart is also a board member for the Economic Development Centre at AUT, past chair of the Economic Development Association of New Zealand and a board member of the Bishop’s Action Foundation. Before forming Venture Taranaki, Stuart was managing director of the largest Chamber of Commerce in the United Kingdom, an external examiner of the MBA programme at the University of Wolverhampton Business School and the course validator for the University of Central England’s Diploma in Management Studies.

Stuart's work in the formation of regional economic development agencies in Poland and Romania was supported by the British Government and European Commission. In October 2012 Stuart was awarded the New Plymouth District Mayoral Award for Business, presented in recognition of over 14 years commitment to economic development in the region. He is a past winner of the Vero Excellence in Business Support Award.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Brand Buzz in the Echoverse

Date: 4 September 2015

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Harald van Heerde, Research Professor of Marketing, Massey University, Auckland, & Extramural Fellow at Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Abstract

Social media has created a reverberating "echoverse" for brand communication, forming complex feedback loops between corporate communications, news media, and user-generated social media. To understand these feedback loops, we process longitudinal, unstructured data from these various communications sources using computational linguistics techniques and analyse the results using econometric methods. By assembling one of the most comprehensive brand communication datasets in the brand communications literature with multiple types of corporate communications, news stories, and social media, we find that the echoverse exists; feedback loops can be found between all of these sources.

Furthermore, the echoverse has intensified as online word-of-mouth has become more prevalent. Over time, online word-of-mouth has become more impactful on news stories, firm communications, consumer sentiment and business outcomes, while traditional consumer sentiment measures have shown less impact. The nature of brand communications has been transformed by online technology as corporate communications moves increasingly from one-to-many (e.g. advertising) to one-to-one (e.g. Twitter) while consumer word-of-mouth moves increasingly from one-to-one (e.g. conversations) to one-to-many (e.g. social media).

Results question the effectiveness of traditional advertising and suggest that companies can benefit from using social media (e.g. Twitter) for personalised responses to customers, as opposed to "broadcast" social media messages. In general the evolving echoverse requires rethinking brand communication strategies, with online communications becoming increasingly central.

Bio

Harald van Heerde (PhD 1999, University of Groningen, The Netherlands) is Research Professor of Marketing at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand and Extramural Fellow at Tilburg University, the Netherlands. His research uses econometric models to measure the effectiveness of marketing activities (such as sales promotion, advertising, assortment) on sales. He is working on new research on a wide range of marketing issues, including new media, mobile marketing, product-harm crises, price wars, business cycles, the marketing of music, tourism marketing, brand equity and marketing in emerging countries.

Hosted by the School of Marketing and International Business, this presentation will be followed by a light lunch. RSVP to marketing@vuw.ac.nz.

Investing for Success: Social Impact Bonds and the Future of Public Services

Date: 2 September 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speakers: Dr Bryce Wilkinson (Senior Fellow) & Jenesa Jeram (Research Assistant) at the New Zealand Initiative

Background

In June 2015, the Ministry of Health announced New Zealand’s first social bond will focus on delivering employment services to people suffering from mental illness. Despite being in development since 2013, this was the first time most New Zealanders had heard of the social bonds pilot.

Social bonds, known as Social Impact Bonds internationally, are a new means of funding and delivering social services. The pilot comes at a time when the Government is actively considering changes to the way social services have traditionally been delivered.

Prior to the Ministry of Health’s announcement, The New Zealand Initiative released a report on the subject: Investing for Success: Social Impact Bonds and the future of public services. The report's authors, Jenesa Jeram and Dr Bryce Wilkinson, explain what Social Impact Bonds are, the possible benefits of the model, whilst remaining realistic about the challenges that must be overcome. The report reviews the international experience and practice to date to draw lessons for their application to New Zealand.

Bio

Jenesa Jeram is a Research Assistant at The New Zealand Initiative working alongside Executive Director Dr Oliver Hartwich.

Dr Bryce Wilkinson is a Senior Fellow at The New Zealand Initiative. Bryce is also the director of economics consultancy Capital Economics.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

New Zealand is Corruption-free - or is it?

Date: 25 August 2015

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Why do we need the Organised Crimes and Anti-Corruption Legislation Bill? Why does New Zealand need to fully ratify the United Nations Convention Against Corruption?

Background

The Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Legislation Bill is into its second reading (you can read all of the submitted evidence here). One of the stated aims of the Bill is to update New Zealand legislation so that it will finally be able to ratify the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) and other international commitments. What does the Bill mean for business, government and the community?

Speakers
  • Louella Cumming, Partner-KPMG Advisory practice and Head of Government Services for KPMG New Zealand
  • Fiona Tregonning, Senior Associate-Bell Gully, past director of Transparency International New Zealand
  • Third speaker TBC

NOTE: You must REGISTER for this event; RSVP to igps@vuw.ac.nz using the subject line: 'RSVP for Corruption free NZ'.

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and Transparency International New Zealand.

The Impact of Early Career Peers and Job Opportunities on Lifetime Success

Date: 21 August 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Steve Stillman, Department of Economics, University of Otago

Abstract

We examine the impact of early career peers and job opportunities on the lifetime success of professional American football and basketball players. We exploit the fact that both the NFL and NBA have a multiple round draft each year where all new professionals are allocated to teams based on the reverse order of success of each team in the previous season. This process is used on a round by round basis, hence the last players chosen in a particular round of the draft are generally selected by the teams with the best records in the previous season while those selected at the beginning of the following round end up on the teams with generally the worst records. Hence, the draft system used in both leagues creates a large discontinuity in the quality of the early career peers and job opportunities for players who ex-ante are judged to have nearly identical ability (i.e. are selected in consecutive draft positions).

We find that being selected by a 'bad' team increase lifetime success for some NFL players likely due to having better early career opportunities while it has a negative impact on lifetime success for NBA players suggesting that early career peers have an important impacts on the success of NBA players.

Bio

Steven Stillman received a PhD in Economics from the University of Washington in 2000. He joined the University of Otago as a professor in the department of economics in July 2011. Prior to this, he was a senior fellow at Motu Economic and Public Policy Research from 2004 to 2011, a senior research economist at the New Zealand Department of Labour from 2002 to 2004 and a postdoctoral fellow at the RAND Corporation from 2000 to 2002.

He is an affiliated researcher at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), the National Institute for Demographic and Economic Analysis (NIDEA), Motu Economic and Public Policy Research, the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research and the William Davidson Institute. Steve's research focuses on empirical labour economics, specialising in the behaviour of individuals and households.

In recent research, he has examined the driver of immigration between Australia and New Zealand, the impact of migration to New Zealand on the income and health of Pacific Islanders both in New Zealand and in the Pacific, retirement behaviour among older Australians, and the effect of economic shocks in Russia on nutrition and overall living standards. Steve is broadly interested in research on migration, health, nutrition, education, household decision-making and inequality.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Director Networks and Accruals Quality in Malaysia

Date: 21 August 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Effiezal Aswadi Abdul Wahab, Curtin University, Western Australia

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between director networks and accruals quality in Malaysia. Using data on 4,416 unique directors who served on the boards of 745 firms listed on Bursa Malaysia during 2011, we map the entire network of directors and generate measures to reflect the importance of such network. We find negative and significant relationship between directors overall network and accruals quality. Our extended analysis on network measures based on ethnicity suggest that non-Bumiputras directors created connections that increases accruals quality, but not for Bumiputras directors. We argue that that the negative effect on accruals quality is due to the importance of social stature, and thus harm hareholders value. Further, we find politically connected directors networks detrimental to accruals quality.

Bio

Dr Effizal Abdul Wahab is a Lecturer at the School of Accounting, Curtin Business School, Curtin University of Technology. His speciality areas are Auditing, Corporate Governance, and Political Connections.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

To Purchase or not to Purchase Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound: Using Evidence-based Practice to Inform Clinical Decision-making within ACC

Date: 20 August 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Melissa Barry, Research Advisor, New Zealand Accident Compensation Corporation

Abstract

This talk focuses on how evidence-based practice in ACC has been used to guide clinical decision making on purchasing specific treatments and interventions. Over time recommendations made based on evidence can evolve due to improved technology or more research becoming available. This has been the case for Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound or LIPUS, an intervention marketed to practitioners as an effective adjunct to fracture healing. In 2015 the evidence used to inform the purchasing of this intervention was reassessed through ACC’s evidence-based practice process. In this example the recommendation changes as a direct result of identifying new evidence and re-examining available evidence using systematic critical appraisal methodology. This case is a practical example of how evidence-based practice can directly impact on policy and purchasing decisions.

Bio

Dr Melissa Barry is a research advisor in the Evidence-Based Healthcare (EBH) group within ACC Research. The EBH group predominantly works closely with the Clinical Services Directorate at ACC to deliver high quality, ACC specific evidence based reviews to support clinical decision making. Melissa has worked on and completed a range of projects within the EBH team at ACC from areas that include science and medical fields as well as business areas to help inform decision making. She has a broad background that includes: Business consulting, academic cellular and clinical neuroscience (in NZ and the United States), and has previously practised as a physiotherapist.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Sustainability in the Film Industry: External and Internal Dynamics Shaping the Wellington Film District

Date: 17 August 2015

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Argelia Muñoz Larroa, School of Management, Victoria University of Wellington

Abstract

This research focused on how to enable sustainability in the film industry. However, it was first necessary to define the term ‘sustainability in the film industry’ and to devise a framework to analyse it. The framework was used to examine the Wellington film district and, as a result, the study identified the disarticulation of production from distribution and commercialisation of films, as well as constraints that obstruct synergistic interrelations among organisations and policy environments towards achieving sustainability.

Those constraints underwrite outcomes in five main areas: financial capacity, ability to maintain labour pools, ability to feed from creative sources, ability to develop productivity and infrastructure, as well as the opportunity to reach audiences. The thesis suggested general paths to canalise relationships in the industry to create sustainability.

Hosted by the School of Management. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Breakout Multinationals: Emerging Market Multinationals in Global Value Chains

Date: 14 August 2015

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11, RH 1113

Speaker: Dr Pavida Pananond, Associate Professor of International Business at Thammasat Business School, Thammasat University, Thailand

Abstract

While Huawei, Tata Motors, and Embraer, are among the most common names when emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) are discussed, not all EMNEs follow the same pattern of growth and internationalisation.

In this seminar, visiting scholar Dr Pavida Pananond argues that the rise of EMNEs is partly driven by their pre-internationalszation position in global value chains (GVCs). She refers in particular to EMNEs that have their early beginning as suppliers and exporters to globally integrated industries. Without upgrading initiatives beyond product and process upgrading, these domestic firms risk being kept captive in lower value-adding activities of the value chain. For these firms to be able to create and capture more value, upgrading along the value chain through internationalisation is crucial, especially in industries in which lead firms exert strong control and dominance.

Bio

Dr Pavida Pananond is Associate Professor of International Business at Thammasat Business School,Thammasat University, Thailand. She received her PhD from the University of Reading. Her research focuses on the internationalisation of firms, with a particular interest in emerging market multinationals and global value chains. 

Hosted by the School of Marketing and International Business

Travel Patterns of Birthing Women in the Southern DHB

Date: 12 August 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Level 3, The Moot Room (GB340)

Speaker: Pauline Dawson, Department of Women's and Children's Health, University of Otago

Abstract

Analysing the travel patterns of birthing women and facility utilization are important aspects of planning and provision of maternity services. In this Masters Research project, electronic records from all births in the Southern District Health Board in 2013 were geocoded and analysed using Geographic Information System software and travel patterns mapped. The study also explored the motivations of a sample of women in this area regarding their birth place choices. Theoretical spatial decision modelling was compared to actual utilization and adjusted to allow for the clinical complexity dictating place of birth. Location-Allocation analysis was also carried out to the test appropriateness of the maternity facility placement based on 2013 demand.

The study found that women are prioritising a perception of safety when they choose their birth place. In a large sparsely-populated area like that covered by Southern District Health Board, this results in some women making long journeys to birth place as they preferentially select complex care facilities over closer primary maternity units or their own home. While acknowledging that the Southern District Health Board has a largely homogenous population, the study indicated that current services may not align with these women’s expectations and needs and may need adjusted to follow population expansion and contraction within the region.

Bio

Pauline Dawson is a research midwife with the Department of Women's and Children's Health, University of Otago and has recently completed this master’s thesis through the Graduate School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health at Victoria University "Travel Patterns of Women Giving Birth in the Southern District Health Board". Pauline acts as a research liaison between maternity provider groups, the University, and the Southern District Health Board, is actively involved with several studies and continues to work clinically within the hospital setting.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

The Evolution of New Zealand's Tourism Datasets

Date: 12 August 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Builidng, Level 5, RWW 501

Speakers: Rebecca Burson (MBIE) & Bernie Hanratty (Statistics NZ)

Background

This presentation will outline key government tourism datasets and the current innovations and developments of these statistics, including advances in the use of electronic card transaction data to measure tourism expenditure.

Bio

Rebecca Burson is a Senior Research Analyst in the Sector Trends team at the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. She has a PhD in Psychology and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology from Victoria University of Wellington. Since joining MBIE, Rebecca has been involved in a variety of tourism products, including the International Visitor Survey and the Regional Tourism Indicators and Estimates. Rebecca is currently leading a review of the Regional Tourism Indicators, due for completion later this year. Rebecca has also contributed to the 2015 Regional Economic Activity Report, due for publication in August/September this year.

Bernie Hanratty is a Statistical Analyst in the National Accounts Economics team at Statistics New Zealand. He has a Bachelor of Tourism and Services Management from Victoria University of Wellington. Bernie is responsible for the delivery of the Tourism Satellite Account, measuring tourism's contribution to the economy by way of expenditure and employment. Bernie was a key member of the Tourism 2025 growth framework project team and is also involved with the development and delivery of Regional Gross Domestic Product.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Herding in Analysts' Recommendations: The Role of the Media

Date: 7 August 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Thanh Huynh, Senior Lecturer, Auckland University of Technology

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of the media on analysts' herding behaviour when making stock recommendations. We find three main results. First, for firms with high news coverage, price reactions following analysts' recommendation revisions that are away from the consensus are weaker than to those closer to it, indicating that the market recognizes analysts' tendency to issue bold recommendations when the firm is intensively covered in the spotlight. Second, when the firm has negative media sentiment, markets react strongly to recommendation revisions that are away from the consensus -- consistent with the notion that the market believes that analysts have an incentive to herd following negative news sentiment. Third, disagreement in the media is associated with higher tendency to herd among analysts.

These findings are robust to the confounding effect of news flows on returns as well as to alternative explanations. Our study offers new insights into the understanding of analysts' herding behaviour.

Bio

Dr Thanh Huynh joined the Department of Finance at Auckland University of Technology in 2014 and was awarded his PhD from Queensland University of Technology in the same year. His PhD thesis entitled “Essays on momentum investing strategies” was awarded QUT Executive Dean’s Commendation for outstanding contribution to the field of study.

He also holds a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) from UNSW. His current research projects concern the role of media in financial markets and the trading behaviour of market participants. He has presented his work to several selective conferences such as the McGill Global Asset Management, Northern Finance Meeting, FMA, and other major conferences.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Construct Creation: Methodological Concerns

Date: 3 August 2015

Time: 1.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11, RH1113

Speakers: Dr Mark Avis (Massey University) & Dr Sarah Forbes (University of Birmingham)

Abstract

Within attitude theory, there is a very fundamental debate over whether attitudes are stored in memory or 'constructed on the spot', with various theoretical strands taking positions on a continuum between these opposing views. There is also a long history of research into methodological bias, which has in turn informed the debate on the nature of attitudes.

The paper that we are preparing sits within these two streams of literature and contributes both to the debate over the nature of attitudes as well as presenting a new, and worrying, concern over research methodology. Although proposing the concern as new, there has been prior literature in which concerns have been raised that the attitudes being measured are not 'real' attitudes at all, for example in politics and political socialisation. The principle that underlies this is that the research process is itself responsible for the development of the attitude. We call this process 'construct creation'. Our concern with the potential for construct creation is centred on the concept of ecological validity i.e. if a construct is created 'in the lab' by a participant as a result of the research, the construct had no prior existence 'in the world' and therefore could not have had any significance in the world. As such, the research derived from construct creation is ecologically invalid.

Our concerns are supported by a body of literature and a research study which shows construct creation in a relatively dramatic way. Following on from such concerns, we draw on extant literature for potential means to ameliorate the potential for deriving research findings from construct creation.

Bio

Dr Mark Avis spent time as a submarine officer in the Royal Navy and worked in international sales and marketing roles before returning to academia. He has an interest in critical approaches to theory, and his research interests include choice of branded products and evolutionary psychology. His work has appeared in journals such as Marketing Theory, Journal of Historical Research in Marketing and Australasian Marketing Journal. Beyond academia he has a personal interest in economics and enjoys modern history (in particular Chinese).

Dr Sarah Forbes completed her PhD in Marketing at the University of Otago. She joined the University of Birmingham (UK) in 2013 where she has been pursuing research interests in research methodology within social marketing, as well as marketing theory. To date, her work has appeared in journals such as Marketing Theory, Australasian Marketing Journal and the New Zealand Medical Journal

Hosted by the School of Marketing and International Business.

New Zealand as a “Social Laboratory”

Date: 30 July 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT 4)

Speaker: Professor Peter Davis, University of Auckland

Abstract

In the period 1890-1920, New Zealand was at times regarded by foreign observers as a "social laboratory" in which new policy initiatives were being set in train. More recently, and famously, Pickett and Wilkinson have developed their "Spirit Level" hypothesis on societal inequality by comparing different countries and drawing conclusions about theory and policy. Are either or both of these approaches just inspiring and metaphorical insights, or can we attribute more rigour to a kind of "thought experiment" that sets a counterfactual to the status quo?

Over the next two years, under a James Cook fellowship, we will be constructing a simulation-based model of some of the key socio-demographic processes in New Zealand society over the last quarter century, drawing in the first instance on the New Zealand Longitudinal Census, 1981-2013, as its empirical foundation. Potentially this is a powerful instrument of cooperative social inquiry that can be used for policy testing, for scholarly purposes, and for teaching as well.

Bio

Peter Davis is Professor of the Sociology of Health and Well-being at the University of Auckland, with cross-appointments in Population Health and Statistics, and founding director of the COMPASS Research Centre, a decade-long grant-funded research group. He has Masters degrees in Sociology and Statistics from the London School of Economics, and a PhD in community health from Auckland. His main interests are in applying advanced methodological techniques to social data in addressing policy and substantive questions.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Did the Mortality Risk of Being Overweight Change in the Early Twentieth Century?

Date: 24 July 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Les Oxley, Professor of Economics, Waikato Management School, University of Waikato

Abstract

The anthropometric history literature is at least implicitly, and often explicitly, longitudinal. Since the mid-1980s, following the pioneering studies of Waaler, anthropometric historians have endeavoured to not only measure changes in height and body mass over cohorts, but also how body composition affects health in later life, often proxied by mortality or life expectancy. Height itself is not the object of interest, but merely a well‐understood proxy. Because height is a summary measure of nutritional conditions in the first two decades of life, studies of the relationship between height and health use the former to proxy for early life conditions.

Beyond a certain point increases in body mass are undesirable for humans, bringing an increased risk of morbidity, particularly cardiovascular conditions. The first results suggest that the relationship between body mass and mortality has changed somewhat between 19th century and modern populations. In this paper, we bring new historical evidence to bear on the question of body composition and health in later life, with a sample of World War I enlistees from New Zealand linked to their vital records.

Bio

Les Oxley is Professor in Economics, Department of Economics and Finance, University of Canterbury, New Zealand and Adjunct Professor, School of Economics and Finance, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia. He is also an Affiliate, Motu, Wellington, New Zealand and Research Associate, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis (CAMA), ANU, Australia.

Les is one of the founding Editors, and currently Managing Editor, of the Journal of Economic Surveys, Senior Editor, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, and is on the editorial boards of several international journals, including Environmental Modelling and Software.

His research interests include: modelling and testing theories of economic growth; financial econometrics; the knowledge economy/society; intellectual property; energy economics and cliometrics.

For his contributions, he was elected Fellow, Royal Society of New Zealand (FRSNZ) in November 2004, following the award of Elected Fellow, Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand, (FMSSANZ), in August 2000. He received the Biennial Medal, (Socio-economic Systems) from the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (iEMSs) in 2006.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Foreign Elder Care Workers: Filipino Health Care Workers and the Care of Older People in New Zealand

Date: 16 July 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speakers: Dr Kirsten Lovelock (Otago University) & Dr Greg Martin (Victoria University)

Abstract

This seminar draws on a qualitative study of migrant care workers from the Philippines working in the eldercare sector in New Zealand. The purpose of this study was to document and explore the recent experience of migrant care workers providing health and social care to the elderly in institutional care settings and in the homes of the elderly in the community with a particular focus on the affective components of care work. This study contributes to a growing body of international literature which focuses on the key issues connected to the migrant elder care workforce.

  • Dr Kirsten Lovelock is a Senior Fellow in the Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington
  • Dr Greg Martin is a Senior Fellow in the Health Services Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

How to Develop a Successful Tourism Product in a SME

Date: 14 July 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Jeroen Jongejans, director of Dive! Tutukaka

Background

The story of Dive! Tutukaka is an inspiring journey of a small adventure tourism company, coping with lack of money, fires on boats, sinking of ships, rough seas and political battles to become one of NZ's most successful SME's in the tourism Industry. A journey through the last 30 years shows the evolution and evolvement of this business through hard work, determination, vision and sheer passion to cope with GFC, competition, seasonality, rough seas and fluctuating interest rates plus all the other obstacles that get in the way of a good night's sleep... innovation, adaptability, new product and re-inventing "the way we do business", coupled with passion and long term vision have shaped the way we move forward.

Jeroen Jongejans started this "dream journey" over 30 years ago after becoming inspired by "the underwater world”, its potential, and the various pressures that deplete this magic resource. He has taken this plight and push for increased awareness through a great number of channels, from Conservation Boards, District Councils, economic development boards, national politics, and various local and national tourism organisations.

  • Jeroen Jongejans has been involved with the adventure tourism and outdoors industry for over 20 years and has also been on many boards, including Northland Tourism Development Group and Tourism Industry Association

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Refreshments will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

The Digital Workshops of the World: Software, Source Code and Skills Migration in the Global VFX Industry

Date: 10 July 2015

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Leon Gurevitch, School of Design, Victoria University of Wellington

Background

Over the last few decades a large and globally distributed digital VFX industry has arisen from the periphery of Hollywood’s traditional base in Los Angeles. As Hollywood visual effects production began to adopt computational processes, practices and technologies, what started out as a branch of the IT and computer sciences industry became a hybrid. Neither 'inside' the Hollywood studios' traditional financial structures, nor entirely outside the value chains attached to Hollywood's film output, the VFX industries have functioned as networks of precarious creative industries offering work for hire on a film by film, contract by contract basis. All of this has lead to an industry defined by migration of labour to an extent that has dwarfed even traditional Hollywood production.

This paper will consider the effects of this migration and its implications for the future of a Global Hollywood increasingly governed by computational production pipelines. The centre piece of this talk will be the demonstration of a crowd-sourced, big-data based, migration visualisation that details the routes 13,000 professionals have taken across the world in search of work in the last 25 years.

Bio

Dr Leon Gurevitch is the Programme Director - Culture+Context at the School of Design. He currently holds a New Zealand Royal Society research grant (Marsden Faststart) for a three-year project to study digital image industry work cultures and global skills migration. This project, 'The Digital Workshops of the World', is funded at $350,000 over three years to map out the interconnected networks of software, skills and source code in the visual effects industry.

Leon is associate editor of Animation: An Interdisciplinary Journal, and was  guest editor of Senses of Cinema Special Edition.

Hosted by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work; tea and coffee will be available and you are welcome to bring your lunch. RSVP to Sue.Ryall@vuw.ac.nz

Drinking and Drugging

Date: 2 July 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Level 3 Moot Room, GB340

Speaker: Martin Woodbridge, Health and Disability Intelligence Unit

Abstract

Alcohol and cannabis are the most commonly used recreational psychoactive substances in New Zealand. Although most New Zealanders drink alcohol in moderation, some do not, and misuse it. And, despite its illegality, cannabis consumption remains relatively high – around 1 in 10 adults use it.

The New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) 2012/13 delved into the use and misuse of alcohol and of cannabis. The reports answer questions like: Does alcohol availability influence risky drinking behaviours? What is the scale of use of cannabis for medicinal purposes? Is there a relationship between pre-pregnancy drinking habits and drinking during pregnancy?

This presentation draws on the findings of the Alcohol Use and Cannabis Use reports. These are valuable tools to support policy development and decision-making on the best way to prevent and reduce the harm associated with alcohol and cannabis. This presentation will be of interest to a range of people - government agencies, the NGO sector, researchers and educators, industry and the public.

Bio

Martin Woodbridge works with Health & Disability Intelligence (HDI) at the Ministry of Health. HDI use high-quality information, analytical resources and tools, and research and evaluation to meet a variety of health and disability information needs. Intelligence outputs support good policy development and decision-making, input into the development of performance measurement frameworks and monitoring, and are the basis of health data reported to international agencies.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Executive Overconfidence and Securities Class Actions

Date: 19 June 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: A/Prof Mark Humphery-Jenner, UNSW Business School, New South Wales

Abstract

Securities class actions (SCAs) harm the subject firm's product market position and often result in disciplinary actions against the CEO. If CEOs (and other senior-executives) trade-off benefits from, say, withholding negative information versus likelihood of detection and SCAs - we expect their choice to be influenced by beliefs regardingfuture firm prospects and likelihood they might rectify the period of poor performance. We hypothesize that overconfident executives, with rosier views of future firm performance, are more likely to engage in reckless or intentional actions that give rise to SCAs.

We find strong evidence that executive-overconfidence increases SCA-likelihood, which is ameliorated by improved governance (following SOX) and reduction in risk-taking incentives (following SFAS-123R). Post-SCA, consistent with being regarded as more blame-worthy, there isgreater likelihood of overconfident-CEO turnover. Overconfident CEOs also learn from prior SCAs, with SCAs attenuating the impact of CEO overconfidence on future litigation risk.

Bio

Mark Humphery-Jenner is an Assistant Professor of Finance at UNSW Business School. Mark’s research spans corporate finance, corporate governance, and law & economics. Mark has published in leading journals, including the Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Strategic Management Journal, and Journal of International Business Studies.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law.

Measuring Inpatient Experience in New Zealand: What do we know, and what does it matter

Date: 17 June 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT 4)

Speakers: Richard Hamblin & Ying Li, Health Quality and Safety Commission

Abstract

There is growing international interest in measuring patient experiences with approaches being advocated which range from the unaffordably rigorous to the uselessly (and even perversely) anecdotal. New Zealand implemented a new inpatient experience survey in 2014 which seeks to chart a middle course which provides affordable, representative, replicable and actionable data.

This talk tells the story of how the survey was implemented, early results and next steps. In doing so it locates the survey within the ecology of health services quality measurement in New Zealand, compares New Zealand’s approach with alternatives, considers whether technological developments and the "trip advisor" culture are a help or hindrance to understanding patient experiences and considers how this sort of approach can be used to generate continuous quality improvement.

Bio

Richard Hamblin is the Commission’s Director of Health Quality Evaluation. He prepares the New Zealand Atlas of Healthcare Variation, and develops quality and safety markers and indicators. Richard has worked in various roles measuring the quality and efficiency of healthcare since the early 1990s including as Director of Intelligence at the Care Quality Commission in the UK, the King’s Fund, and the NHS. He was a 2006/07 Harkness Fellow.

Ying Li is Senior Analyst at Health Quality and Safety Commission. She works on the health quality and safety markers and indicators. Prior to this Ying was a Senior Analyst working on financial forecasting at the Ministry of Education and a Statistical Analyst working on a longitudinal survey at Statistics New Zealand. Ying has a Master of Science in Statistics and Operation Research and a Postgraduate Diploma in Financial Mathematics from Victoria University of Wellington.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Bank Working Experience versus Political Connections: Which Matters for Bank Loan Financing?

Date: 12 June 2015

Time: 11.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Gary Tian, Professor of Finance, University of Wollongong, New South Wales

Abstract

This paper examines how either executives' connections with banks through their former banking experience or their political connections with governments affect firms' bank loan financing, using a sample of bank loans granted to Chinese listed non-SOEs from 2003 to 2010. We find that firms with bank or political connections have a higher likelihood of access to bank loans, obtain more bank loans and have lower use of collateral, and the effect of bank connections is more significant than that of political connections.

We further find that bank loans are more closely related to profitability for firms with bank connections, while firms’ political connections weaken this relationship. Furthermore, firms with bank connections are less likely to become financially distressed after the initiation of their bank loans and experience higher bank loan announcement returns, while firms with political connections experience the opposite situation.

Overall, our results indicate that in the context of relationship-based informal institutions prevailing in China, firms’ connections with banks create value by alleviating information asymmetry and improving banks’ lending decisions, while political connections result in capital misallocation and subsequent deterioration in performance. 

Bio

Gary Tian is Professor of Finance and Director of the Chinese Commerce Research Centre in the School of Accounting, Economics and Finance at the University of Wollongong.

He has published extensively in the areas of political connections, CEO compensation, bank lending, corporate governance and market microstructure.

Last year Professor Tian secured the only ARC Discovery Grant in the field of finance. He won a Best Paper Award from the Financial Management Association in 2011 and the 2013 Runner up Award from Corporate Governance: An International Review.

Currently he serves as the Secretory of the Asian Finance Association and a member of the editorial board for the Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Liability for Paying Pensions under the 2001 New Zealand-Australian Social Security Agreement: Uneven Burdens?

Date: 12 June 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Associate Professor Andrew Smith, Victoria University

Abstract

Shortly after Australia and New Zealand introduced social security programmes in their respective countries, the two countries entered into a treaty (know as a "social security agreement" or "SSA") to coordinate and harmonise the payment of social securitiy benefits to individuals who had split their working lives between the two countries. The first of these SSAs was negotiated in 1943 but was subsequently replaced by a number of revised SSAs, the latest of which was negotiated in 2001.

Apart from this latest SSA, all of the earlier SSAs were based on the principle that the country where the claimant resided would assume responsibility for paying their pension even though part or all of the claimant’s working life hadbeen spent in the other country. Such an arrangement was sustainable when the flow of migrants between the two countries were roughly similar and pension levels approximately the same.

As migration from New Zealand to Australia became significantly greater than migration in the opposite direction, pressure arose for New Zealand to assume liability for at least some of the costs of paying pensions to its migrants who had retired in Australia. Initially this was met by direct government to government reimbursements, but these later became a point of disagreement between the two governments ultimately leading to the negotiation of a new SSA in 2001. The 2001 SSA incorporates a fractional pension model whereby each country pays a part pension basedon the time the claimant has spent working in each country. This model is intended to produce a fairer allocation of pension costs between the two countries reflecting the tax that would have been collected by each country from a claimant during their working life.

The allocation of pension costs under this model is complicated by two factors. Firstly, the total pension payable to the claimant is determined solely by the domestic pension rules of the country where they have retired. Secondly, the amount the other state must contribute to that pension is determined by the domestic pension rules of that country, not the state where the claimant has retired. As a consequence, the actual burdens for each country of meetingthe pension costs of a migrant will not be necessarily proportional to the time the claimant has spent in each country during their working life.

This paper will examine how pension costs will be allocated in practice between Australia and New Zealand under the 2001 SSA through the use of a model. Results from the model suggests that the 2001 SSA will not necessarily producean appropriate allocation of pension costs and that one state may be left with a disproportionate burden. This raises questions whether the basis for allocating pension costs under the 2001 SSA is sustainable in the longer term and alsowhether divergent domestic pension policies can be maintained in an open migration environment.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law.

Zoning and the Economic Geography of Cities

Date: 4 June 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr. Randall Walsh, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Pittsburgh and Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research

Abstract

What determines the spatial organization of production and consumption in cities? The extant literature has focused almost exclusively on the role of market forces. We argue that a ubiquitous local government policy, zoning, has a profound influence on the development of cities. Using the introduction of comprehensive zoning in Chicago in 1923 along with a detailed map of pre-zoning land uses, we show that the initial zoning ordinance has had an economically large impact on the location of industry, TRI facilities, commerce, and residential neighborhoods in the present.

Our results are robust to a series of border identification exercises, suggesting that they are likely not driven by unobserved path dependence in land use that is correlated with the zoning ordinance. We assess the heterogeneous impact of zoning in areas of Chicago that were heavily developed by 1923 and in areas of the city that were undeveloped but still subject to zoning.

We conclude with a discussion and analysis of regulation and land use in Houston, the only unzoned major city in the US.

Bio

Dr. Randall P. Walsh is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh and a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to joining the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh he was on the faculty of the University of Colorado. He received a B.S. Summa Cum Laude from the University of New Hampshire and a PhD in Economics from Duke University. He has been an active researcher in the areas of environmental and urban economics for over 15 years, focusing on issues related to environmental quality, income, race, and neighborhood choice.

He currently serves as co-Editor of the journal Economic Inquiry. His research on environmental quality and the demographic composition of neighborhoods has been supported by both the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Persistent Polio

Date: 3 June 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Dr Hilary Stace, Visiting Research Fellow, Health Services Research Centre

Abstract

HSRC-smallPoliomyelitis was a feared disease in New Zealand for the first half of the 20th century. In the days before vaccines polio mainly affected children and young adults. It struck randomly, had no cure and peaked in regular epidemics. It killed or left some victims unable to breathe for themselves in an iron lung, or with limbs permanently paralysed. Widespread community panic closed schools and isolated families. Children were sent away from home for treatment for long periods.

The race for a vaccine was championed by polio survivor President Roosevelt and involved numerous scientists, countries and institutionalised children. There is much to celebrate about the global eradication campaign which has resulted in only one region reporting new cases this year. However, many New Zealanders still live with the effects of polio and they do not want to be forgotten.

Bio

Hilary Stace is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Health Services Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington, whose research interests include disability experience, history and policy. She remembers as a child lining up in the classroom for the pink drink that would stop any more children getting polio.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

The Physical and Social Determinants of Mortality in the 3.11 Tsunami

Date: 2 June 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Daniel Aldrich, Director of Asian Studies, Purdue University

Abstract

The human consequences of the 3.11 tsunami were not distributed equally across the municipalities of the Tohoku region of northeastern Japan. Instead, the mortality rate from the massive waves varied tremendously from zero to ten percent of the local residential population. What accounts for this variation remains a critical question for researchers and policy makers alike. This paper uses a new, sui generis data set including all villages, towns, and cities on the Pacific Ocean side of the Tohoku region to untangle the factors connected to mortality during the disaster.

With data on demographic, geophysical, infrastructure, social capital, and political conditions for 133 municipalities, we find that tsunami height, stocks of social capital, and level of political support for the long-ruling LDP strongly influenced mortality rates. Given the high probability of future large scale catastrophes, these findings have important policy implications for disaster mitigation policies in Japan and abroad.

Bio

Daniel P. Aldrich is University Faculty Scholar, Director of Asian Studies, and Professor in Purdue University's Department of Political Science. He has published four books, more than thirty peer reviewed articles, and written OpEds for the New York Times, CNN, Asahi Shinbun, and other popular media outlets.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Is There a CEO Honeymoon Period?

Date: 22 May 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Helen Lu, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Auckland

Abstract

Recently appointed CEOs on average enjoy a honeymoon period in the stock market. Stock prices drop less in response to earnings decreases announced in the first four quarters of CEO tenure than to those announced by firms with established CEOs. This effect is not a result of earnings baths. For new CEOs who take over the helm during challenging times – who deserve a grace period the most – the honeymoon effect is more pronounced. If investors anticipate transitory bad earnings news from firms with new CEOs, stock prices can respond less to bad earnings news from these firms.

We find that the honeymoon period exists in firms with analyst coverage but not in firms without analyst coverage, suggesting that analysts play a role in helping investors gauge the likelihood and permanence of earnings decreases following a change in CEO.

Bio

Helen Lu joined the University of Auckland in January 2014. Helen received her doctoral degree in 2013 and lectured at the University of Otago before moving back to Auckland. Prior to moving to New Zealand and returning to her academic life, Helen was a vice president at Credit Suisse and, before that, at Deutsche Bank in Hong Kong. Her corporate finance experience includes IPOs, privatisations, convertible bonds and cross-border M&A for clients in the natural resources and the general industries sectors.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Marketing Strategy in the Context of Social Enterprise Dualities

Date: 1 May 2015

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Judith Madill, Professor of Marketing at the Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa

Abstract

It is expected that social enterprises (SEs) will grow in number and importance in the near future. This can be put down to increasing emergence of social needs and problems throughout the world, accompanied by reduced government ability to provide the funding necessary to combat these problems.

In this presentation, Professor Madill discusses the SE context and proposes a model of how this context affects marketing strategy in SEs. She discusses key marketing strategies and draws on empirical qualitative research consisting of a comparative study of fifteen cases of SEs. Results show that four major dualities represent the critical context of SEs that influence the marketing strategies employed.

Bio

Professor Judith Madill received her PhD from the Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario and is a Professor of Marketing at the Telfer School of Management. Her research focuses on how social marketing, social entrepreneurship and sponsorship can help make the world a better place.

Professor Madill is a frequently invited speaker on marketing in both the academic and practitioner worlds and is a recent winner of awards for teaching and research.

Hosted by the School of Marketing and International Business; RSVP to marketing@vuw.ac.nz by Thursday 23 April.

An Investigation of Social Impact Bonds for Health and Social Care

Date: 28 April 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT4)

Speaker: Nicholas Mays, Professor of Health Policy and Director, Policy Research Unit in Policy Innovation Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Abstract

Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) have recently become part of the public services landscape in the UK and internationally (including pilots in NZ). In a SIB contract, public sector commissioners partner with private or Third Sector social investors to fund interventions that seek to tackle complex social issues. Under these arrangements, non-government investors cover the upfront costs necessary to set up the interventions implemented by service providers, while the government commissioner commits to pay a return on investment if pre-defined desired outcomes are reached. In the field of health and social care, nine projects across England, collectively known as the SIB ‘trailblazers’, have received seed funding from the government’s Social Enterprise Investment Fund to assess the merits of, and potentially implement, a SIB.

The Department of Health’s Policy Research Programme has commissioned an independent evaluation of these projects from the Policy Innovation Research Unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, in partnership with RAND Europe, to explore their potential benefits and costs. This presentation provides an overview of the interim findings of the independent evaluation.

Bio

Nicholas Mays is Professor of Health Policy and Director, Policy Research Unit in Policy Innovation Research and Joint Editor, Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Department of Health Services Research & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

The Family Group Conference: Working Together

Date: 24 April 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 5, RWW 501

Speaker: Chris Polaschek, General Manager for Youth Justice Support at Child, Youth and Family, Ministry of Social Development

Background

The face of the Youth Justice Family Group Conference is changing after 25 years.

The changes, which reflect a better understanding of what drives offending behaviour, are encouraging an increased focus on agencies, families and community providers working together.

This in turn is being mirrored within the Justice sector where government agencies are finding new ways to cooperate at all levels and partner with communities in the pursuit of reducing youth crime.

Bio

Chris Polaschek is the General Manager for Youth Justice Support at Child, Youth and Family, Ministry of Social Development. This role involves leadership for Youth Justice within the Service and the sector, developing operational policy and managing a variety of key Government projects, one of which is Fresh Start, which included developing a Military Activity Centre for serious young offenders. He is currently chair of the Youth Crime Action Plan Steering Group and also has responsibility for a CYF led project on Reinvigorating Family Group Conferences.

Chris has worked with juvenile and adult offenders in a wide variety of roles over the last 25 years including as a social worker, residential manager, prison manager and National Manager Youth Justice. He is a qualified social worker and has BA in sociology from Canterbury University.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Land Use and General Equilibrium Implications of a Forest-Based Carbon Sequestration Policy in the US

Date: 24 April 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House. Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Juan J. Monge, Scientist, Scion (New Zealand Forest Research Institute), Rotorua

Abstract

A static Computable General Equilibrium model was used to assess the impacts of forest-based carbon payments on sequestration, land use, and agricultural commodity prices in the US. A modified 2008 regional Social Accounting Matrix, considering land as a heterogeneous factor, was used as the model’s main input. The matrix was projected to its 2050 counterpart using capital and labor growth projections. The forest-generated carbon offset sources considered were afforested set-asides, commercial forestry intensification and harvested wood products. A new dataset on regional afforestation carbon uptake rates and costs was used to include afforested set-asides as latent activities.

For a carbon offset price of $20/MT CO2, 14% of U.S. annual emissions could be sequestered in 2050. More than half of the additional carbon sequestered (724 million MT CO2), compared to the 2050 baseline, would be attributed to set-asides and composed mainly of softwood forests. High carbon prices would increase land prices resulting in the diversion of 15% and 9% of pasture and cropland to carbon set-asides, respectively, mainly in the Central Plains. The high agricultural land diversion would force activities to intensify production systems driving the prices of beef up by 12% as well as oilseeds and grains by 4% each.

Bio

Juan J. Monge holds a PhD in agricultural economics from Texas A&M University and specialises in the application of mathematical programming, risk simulation and econometrics to agriculture and natural resources. Specifically, the use of economic general assessment frameworks such as Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models, Input-Output (I-O) models and Social Accounting Matrices (SAM) to study the impact of different environmental, fiscal and trade policies on regional economies.

Dr. Monge’s research experience on risk simulation includes the profitability assessment of new biofuel technologies under bio-economic uncertainty in a joint project between Texas A&M AgriLife and Chevron Technology Ventures. He moved to the country a year ago to work for the New Zealand Forest Research Institute (Scion) on a wide variety of issues related to the forestry industry including impact assessments of potential environmental policies, profitability of indigenous tree species, use of new timber phytosanitary alternatives, economic and environmental comparison of the value chains of different land-dependent primary industries.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Family Firms, Firm Performance and Political Connections: Evidence from Bangladesh

Date: 24 April 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Associate Professor Reza Monem, Griffith University, Australia

Abstract

We investigate the role of political connections in the performance of family firms. We do so in the setting of Bangladesh, an emerging economy in which family firms are dominant, and a weak regulatory environment increases the payoffs from political connections. We find that family firms perform better than nonfamily firms. Moreover, politically connected family firms outperform other family firms that are not politically connected. In contrast, political connections for nonfamily firms lead to lower firm performance than other nonfamily firms.

Bio

Prior to Griffith University, Dr Monem held academic positions at the University of Queensland (Australia), National University of Singapore (Singapore), and Dhaka University (Bangladesh). His teaching specialisation is in financial accounting at postgraduate level, with research interest in the interface between financial reporting and corporate governance.

Dr Monem's research papers have been published in scholarly journals including Contemporary Accounting Research, the International Journal of Accounting, Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics, Accounting & Finance, Advances in Accounting, Australian Accounting Review, and Pacific Accounting Review.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

IT, Entrepreneurship and Firm Growth: Research Gaps and Opportunities

Date: 16 April 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 125

Speaker: Dr Jean-Grégoire Bernard, School of Information Management

Abstract

This presentation examines how entrepreneurial firms learn about how to adopt, deploy, and assimilate IT capabilities in anticipation of, and during periods of sustained growth. Theories and empirical evidence about the management and maturity of IT in small firms are surveyed to identify research gaps and tenuous assumptions.

There are several insights. First, small firms tend to be considered as a homogeneous unit of analysis, without distinction between stable, mature small firms, and emerging, growing entrepreneurial ventures. Second, a firm’s emergence and early life have been relatively neglected in comparison to later periods of a firm’s growth. Third, past and current IS theories tend to downplay the organizational and behavioural dynamics that accompany firm growth, in favour of dynamics grounded in technological determinism. This study contributes to the research on IS strategy, IS adoption, and IS assimilation, in small and large firms alike, by proposing new premises for further theory development.

Bio

Jean-Grégoire's teaching and research focuses on issues pertaining to the adoption, implementation, and governance of IT-enabled organisational innovations within and across organisations. His work on these topics draws on a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods, and sits at the intersection of information systems and organisation studies. His PhD in Management from Queen's University (Canada) investigated how four firms from the high-tech and creative industries appropriated information technology to generate transparency that enable managers to deal with the challenges of organisational growth.

Hosted by the School of Information Management.

Creating High Performing Public Service Organisations: Moving from Problem ID to Solutions

Date: 14 April 2015

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

This seminar brings together senior executives, managers, policy and employment relations people and researchers to discuss high performance in the public sector. It aims to look at how the issues are currently being addressed, strategies and tactics for success, and the role of leadership.

Keynote speakers include:

  • Murray Sherwin, Chairperson, Productivity Commission
  • Peter Gahan, Centre for Workplace Leadership, University of Melbourne
Document File size File type
 Public Sector Workforce Seminar Programme  680 KB PDF
 Registration Form 315 KB PDF

Hosted by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work.

The Year the Gorge Stood Still: A Natural Disaster’s Impact on Travel Time to Health Services and their Use

Date: 9 April 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Jayden MacRae, CEO of Patients First

Background

HSRC-smallThe Manawatu Gorge was closed for a period of 12 months from August 2011, disrupting the main travel route to those that live in the eastern area of the MidCentral health district to the main hospital services located in Palmerston North to the west. We studied the impact of this natural disaster on the use of both hospital and general practice services using existing and adapted geospatial analysis techniques.

This presentation will appeal to those with interests in health utilisation issues, disaster planning and the application of geospatial techniques to health particularly for the improvement of geospatial data quality and fidelity.

Bio

Jayden MacRae is a data scientist, all-around geospatial enthusiast and CEO of Patients First, a boutique health information integrator. Jayden originally studied as a physiotherapist, gaining a Bachelor of Physiotherapy from the University of Otago and then later a Postgraduate Diploma in Health Informatics and a Master of Science in Geography from the University of Canterbury. He has spent the majority of his professional career working in the health information field in both technical and management roles and has specific interests in geospatial information systems, natural language processing, machine learning, data quality, open source platforms and open data.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

2015 Asian Development Outlook Report

Date: 30 March 2015

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: Railway West Wing, Level 5, RWW 501

Dr Christopher Edmonds, Senior Economist at ADB’s Pacific Department, will present the Asia and Pacific highlights of the annual economic report Asian Development Outlook 2015. Professor Ilan Noy from Victoria Business School will introduce and chair the seminar.

Background

ADB’s flagship economic publication Asian Development Outlook 2015 (ADO) provides a comprehensive analysis of economic performance in the past year and offers forecasts for the next 2 years for the 45 economies in Asia and the Pacific including People’s Republic of China and India.

This year’s special ADO theme chapter, "Financing Asia's Future Growth" explores the role of developing Asia's financial system in sustaining its growth, while also examining ways to make the system more inclusive and stable. The region's growth has moderated visibly since the GFC of 2008–2009. At the same time, the region is in the midst of a structural transition toward a new growth paradigm in which productivity growth will play a larger role. The region’s finance sector will thus have to develop in a way that supports growth by boosting both investment and productivity. A financial system that efficiently allocates capital to its most productive use is a vital ingredient of the new growth paradigm.

To make growth more inclusive, the region’s policy makers will be challenged to find ways to extend access to finance to the poor, and small and medium-sized enterprises. In addition, developing Asian countries must strengthen financial stability, for example through better regulation, so that the finance sector does not itself become a source of growth-harming volatility. Overall, this theme chapter will provide policy advice on how the region can foster stable financial systems that can support efficient and inclusive growth in the post-GFC world.

For ADB inquiries please contact Sally Shute-Trembath, ADB Senior External Relations Officer

Critical Realist Accounting Research: Whence and Wither?

Date: 20 March 2015

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway West Wing, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Sven Modell, Manchester Business School, University of Manchester and Norwegian School of Economics, Bergen

Abstract

Over the past decade, a small but growing body of accounting research explicitly informed by critical realism has started to emerge and be deployed to diverse research tasks. This paper offers a review and critique of this emerging strand of accounting research against the backdrop of broader developments in the critical realist research programme in the social sciences and explores its potential to contribute to critical accounting scholarship.

It is argued that the use of critical realism in the accounting literature has thus far been rather piecemeal and only partially geared towards developing an explicitly critical or politically engaged research agenda aimed at advancing radical social critique. Whilst these features can partly be traced to internal divisions within the larger critical realist project in the social sciences, I elaborate on how emerging accounting studies can be developed into a more coherent and integrative research programme drawing on diverse strands of critical realist thought.

In doing so, I pay particular attention to how such research can be imbued with more clearly articulated, critical intent. This is achieved by incorporating explanatory critiques pivoting on the twin concepts of retroduction and retrodiction into a contingent approach to critical research interventions recognising the varying ontological possibilities of emancipation embedded in social structures and the subjectively induced propensity for reflexivity among human agents.

I elaborate on how such an approach may take critical accounting research beyond past controversies concerning the degrees of determinism and radicalism ascribed to especially Marxist and post-modernist (or post-structuralist) research as well as empiricist tendencies emerging as a counter-reaction to the allegedly pre-conceived notions of critique associated with these research genres.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Not-for-Profit Seminar Series: Taxation Issues for Charities and Not-for-Profit Organisations

Date: 26 February 2015

Time: 8.15 am

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Opening address: Hon Todd McLay, Minister of Revenue. Speakers: Sue Barker (Sue Barker Charities Law); Phil Fisher (Tax Team); Charles Ngaki (IRD); John Shewan (Adjunct Professor, School of Accounting and Commercial Law)

Background

At the last seminar in this Not for Profit Series, many participants noted the need for more informed discussion about tax issues in the sector.

The opening seminar in 2015 will cover: 

  • GST issues for not-for-profit entities in relation to branch registration and revenue generation 
  • Remuneration and tax 
  • Donations – definitions, overseas donations and donee status 
  • Tax obligations in relation to de-registration from Charities Services (especially if this is due to an organisational re-structure)

Further details

This NFP Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR).

Illegal Groundwater Pumping

Date: 19 February 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Associate Professor Catarina Roseta Palma, ISCTE, Lisbon University Institute, Portugal

Abstract

Aquifer overexploitation is a serious problem in many regions. Most existing models minimize the difference between optimally managed aquifers and common property myopic solutions by not considering the environmental consequences of aquifer overexploitation. Moreover, it is becoming clear that illegal extractions are a significant stumbling block on the path towards the implementation of better management policies.

In this paper we develop a model of illegal pumping for irrigation in a setting where there are soil-productivity differences, with and without environmental externalities. We also discuss policy options when economic and social penalties affect compliance.

Bio

Associate Professor Catarina Roseta Palma is from the Department of Economics, ISCTE, and teaches in graduate and undergraduate courses within the fields of Microeconomics, Public Economics, and Environmental and Resource Economics. Her areas of research are in Environmental Economics and Economics.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Business Links Breakfast Seminar: Should Wellington become a Super City?

Date: 17 February 2015

Time: 7.00 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

The Centre for Accounting Governance and Taxation Research and the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies are pleased to invite you to a breakfast seminar:

Should Wellington become a Super City?

The Local Government Commission has presented its draft proposal for one council for the whole of the Wellington region (with eight Local Boards). The draft proposal for amalgamation is available online and submissions to the Commission close on 2 March 2015.

At this seminar Graham Sansom will present the background and key issues relevant to the proposal, while John Shewan will present the case for the proposal and Philip Barry the case against.

The presentations will be followed by opportunity for discussion.

This is a free seminar. For catering purposes kindly RSVP (acceptances only) by Thursday, 12 February to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz  or telephone 04 463 5550

Trust and the Management of Uncertainty in Healthcare Rationing Decisions: The Case of NICE Technological Appraisals in England

Date: 4 February 2015

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Buidling, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Professor Michael Calnan, University of Kent, UK  

Abstract:

HSRC-small

This presentation examines the ‘technological appraisals’ carried out by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence as it regulates the provision of expensive new drugs within the English NHS on cost effectiveness grounds. Regulators must assess and manage ‘risk’ in order to ensure the effective functioning of the transactions which occur under their jurisdiction. Recent evidence suggests that this role is more one of managing uncertainty than managing risk, but few investigations have explored how uncertainty is dealt with at the micro-level.

The presentation draws on ethnographic data – interviews with a range of stakeholders and decision-makers, observations of public and closed regulator meetings, and documentary analysis – regarding the decision-making processes involving three different pharmaceutical products. The study explores the various ways in which different forms of uncertainty are perceived, considered, presented and tackled both formally and informally within these drug appraisals.

Bio:

Professor Calnan is a medical sociologist who is interested in the Sociology of Health, Medicine and Health policy and has published extensively on wide range of health related topics. His current research interests include: (1) the study of trust relations in health systems including comparative work in Australia and India and a study on Trust, Risk and Uncertainty in NICE decision making and 2) the study of ageing and dignity in health care for older people.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

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Symposiums

Identifying What Works: Using Randomised Control Trials in Public Policy

Date: 7 July 2015

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatres 1 & 2 (GBLT1 & 2)

The aim of this free, full-day symposium is to build more knowledge and capability around Randomised Control Trials, both in government and among interested parties.

There will be presentations by international experts, a panel on examples, keynotes on 'Importance of Evidence' and 'Broader Issues of RCT's', and much more.

Speakers:
  • Professor Sir Peter Gluckman
  • Professor David Fergusson
  • Professor Philippa Howden-Chapman
  • Professor Stuart McNaughton
  • Professor Richie Poulton
  • Associate Professor Tim Dare
  • Dr Sarah-Baird
  • David McKenzie
  • Berk Özler

Moderator and MC: Associate Professor Michael Macaulay (Institute for Governance & Policy Studies)

Document File size File type
 Download the full programme  1.38 MB PDF
 Download the flyer  1.2 MB PDF

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Workshops

NZ Macroeconomic Dynamics Workshop 2016

Date: 29 April 2016

Time: 8.15 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

The School of Economics and Finance will hold its 6th workshop on Friday, 29 April 2016 to honour leading macroeconomist Professor Stephen J Turnovsky (Ford and Louisa Van Voorhis Professor of Economics at the University of Washington, USA).

This year, we have Professor Bruce Preston, University of Melbourne to give keynote speech, In Search of a Nominal Anchor: What Drives Inflation Expectations?

Other presenters will be:

  • Miles Parker, Reserve Bank of New Zealand
  • Dr Saten Kumar, Auckland University of Technology
  • Dr Cagri Kumru, Australian National University
  • Michinao Okachi, Australian National University
  • Assistant Professor Shengdao Zhu, National University of Singapore
  • Prof. Britta Gehrke, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg
  • Associate Professor Valentyn Panchenko, University of New South Wales

The workshop programme can be viewed below:

Document File Type File Size
NZ Macroeconomic Dynamics Workshop Programme PDF 660KB

Microeconomics Workshop

Date: 30 October 2015

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

The School of Economics and Finance invites you to attend the 2015 Microeconomics Workshop at Victoria University's Pipitea campus.

Academics from New Zealand and Australia will lead four sessions during the day. Speakers include:

  • Dr Richard Watt, University of Canterbury
  • Dr Vladimir Petkov, Victoria University
  • Dr Vladimir Smirnov, University of Sydney
  • Dr Richard Meade, University of Auckland
  • Dr Simona Fabrizi, Massey University
  • Dr Steffen Lippert, University of Auckland
  • Dr Georgy Artemov, University of Melbourne
  • Dr Yiğit Sağlam, Victoria University

For catering purposes, RSVP to Ingrid.Watts@vuw.ac.nz no later than Friday, 23 October 2015. Please advise if you have any special dietary requirements.

Document File size File type
 SEF Microeconomic Workshop Programme 625 KB PDF

The Digital Economy in Wellington: Too Invisible for its Own Good?

Date: 22 October 2015

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2 (GBLT2)


The School of Management and the School of Computer Science are co-hosting this opportunity to learn and discuss research findings from leading practitioners, and consider the next steps for Wellington's digital sector.

This workshop is supported by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work, the Wellington Regional Strategy office, and the Wellington Regional Council.

Background

Wellington’s digital sector is a major success story of the past decade yet compared with tourism and film is one that typically flies below the public radar. Research with 50 leading Wellington digital companies provides insights into the strengths and challenges of this steadily growing industry.

ScheduleProgramme
4.00-4.10pm

Digital sector companies and Wellington’s economic development strategy

Fran Wilde, Greater Wellington Regional Council

4.10-4.30pm

What did our research tell us? Strengths and challenges in areas of recruiting, training and growth. Why is this sector so invisible in debates about Wellington’s economic directions?

Dr Richard Norman, Research Project Director, School of Management, Victoria University

4.30-4.50pm

Education & Industry perspectives

Stu Marshall, Head of School, Engineering & Computer Science, Victoria University
Peter Stevens, Chief Executive, GS1 New Zealand
Tyrone McAuley, Director, PikPok (formerly Sidhe Interactive)
Emily Loughnan, Director, Click Suite

4.50-5.30pm

Recruiting, training and retaining skilled staff at a time of skill shortages

Ruth McDavitt, CEO, Summer of Tech 
Craig Scott-Hill, HR Manager, Powershop
Sarah Meaney, Senior Learning & Development Advisor, Intergen
Lauren Fayen, In-House Recruitment Specialist, Intergen

5.30-6.00pm

What could make a difference to Wellington’s digital companies?

Andrew Smith, CEO, Touchtech
Alastair Turrell, Director, Datacom

6.00pm

Networking and refreshments

Memory, Archive and Social Justice Masterclass

Date: 16 September 2015

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Railway Buidling, Level 5, RWW 501


The School of Information Management and Victoria Executive & Professional Development are delighted to have renowned international archivist Verne Harris in Wellington to present a day-long session on memory, archive and social justice.

Background

In this masterclass Verne Harris will explore the linkages – conceptual, ethical and practical – between memory, archive and social justice. His fundamental premise is that the work of the archive is justice. He will lead a discussion with participants around this premise, following five lines of enquiry – power, pasts, spectrality, ethics and praxis.

Who should attend: Students, academics and practitioners with an interest in archive, memory work, transitional justice, human rights, and/or deconstruction.

Bio

Currently Director of Research and Archive at the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Verne Harris was Nelson Mandela’s archivist from 2004 to 2013.

He is an honorary research fellow with the University of Cape Town, has participated in a range of structures which transformed South Africa’s apartheid archival landscape, including the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and is a former Deputy Director of the National Archives of South Africa.

Widely published, he is probably best-known for leading the editorial team on the best-seller Nelson Mandela: Conversations with Myself. He is the recipient of an honorary doctorate from the University of Cordoba in Argentina (2014), plus archival publication awards from Australia, Canada and South Africa, and both his novels were short-listed for South Africa’s M-Net Book Prize.

He has served on the Boards of Archival Science, the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation, the Freedom of Expression Institute, and the South African History Archive.

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