Victoria Business School

Past Events

Conferences

International Conference on Collaboration and Technology (CRIWG 2013)

Date: 30 October – 1 November 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Wellington Railway Station, Pipitea Campus

The 19th International Conference on Collaboration and Technology (CRIWG 2013) is taking place in Wellington between 30 October and 1 November 2013. The conference is supported and governed by the Collaborative Research International Working Group (CRIWG), an open community of collaboration technology researchers. Victoria University of Wellington, School of Information Management will host this year’s edition.

Traditionally, CRIWG conferences offer a strong focus on collaboration technology design, development, and evaluation. The conferences bring together researchers from the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Oceania who present papers that report on innovative combinations of technical, human, and organisational approaches to expand collaboration support.

Their work is often grounded in theory from various disciplines such as computer science, management science, information systems, engineering, psychology, cognitive sciences, and social sciences.

The papers presented at CRIWG 2013 will be published by Springer, LNCS series, in volume 8224.

For more information and to register visit the CRIWG 2013 website.

A GLAMorous Future? Reflecting on Integrative Practice between Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums

Date: 6 September 2013

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1


Professionals, academics, and members of the public with an interest in the Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums sector, are invited to A GLAMorous Future.

This one day conference brings together national/international academics and sector professionals to critically reflect on the challenges and opportunities for our Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums in an increasingly integrated environment.

It will open with a keynote address by Emeritus Professor of Archivistics (Archival Science) Eric Ketelaar, and conclude with a panel discussion featuring Mike Houlihan (Chief Executive of Te Papa): Bill Macnaught (National Librarian): and Greg Goulding (Chief Archivist).

  • When: Friday 6 September, 10am-4pm
  • Where: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1
  • Fee: $150; see the Registration Page for further information

Overview:

The increasing development of buildings designed to collectively house our galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM), along with innovative models of joined-up operation provide challenges and opportunities for the cultural heritage sector. The tightening of resources, new tourism ventures, increasing community engagement and changes in technology are considered the drivers for the proliferation of this new GLAMorous way of thinking. While the development of GLAMour increases, there is a lack of critical reflection considering the implications of these changes on the future of our cultural heritage sector. What does GLAMour mean?

This one-day conference provides a forum for academics, practitioners and participants to come together and consider the future of GLAMorous practice. A set of questions provide the framework for critical reflection.

  • Should our galleries, libraries, archives and museums work together to build GLAMour and if so, how should they do this?
  • What sort of GLAMorous infrastructure might be required?
  • What do users want and need from GLAMour and will the education of our GLAMorous information professionals need to change?

Hosted by the School of Information Management in conjunction with Victoria Professional and Executive Development.

Public-Private Partnerships: Building Infrastructure for the Future

Date: 29 August 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatres 1 & 2

ISCR logo
  • Welcome / Opening speech by Hon. Bill English, Deputy Prime Minister
  • Keynote Speaker: Professor Ronald Fischer (University of Chile)
  • Co-Chairs: Dr Toby Daglish, Research Director (ISCR); Bronwyn Howell, General Manager (ISCR)

The first session of the Public-Private Partnerships Conference, from 9.00-10.30am in GBLT1, includes the opening by Deputy Prime Minister Bill English and the keynote address by Professor Ronald Fischer, who will be delivering an address on the economic implications of Public-Private Partnerships.

This is a great opportunity to hear from a leading international academic and the holder of the purse strings tied to all NZ PPPs. To enable these presenters to be widely heard, Victoria Business School staff are invited to attend this session free of charge; indicate your intention to attend by emailing Tracy.Warbrick@vuw.ac.nz.

The Conference Programme includes sessions on physical infrastructures, 'soft' infrastructures, governance, tendering and finance issues with papers by academics, practitioners and policy experts from New Zealand and Australia. Further details are available from the ISCR website.

Registrations are available for individual sessions at $50 (incl GST); there are still a number of conference registrations available at $150 (incl GST) for the whole day attendance.

Hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation. Register by emailing Tracy.Warbrick@vuw.ac.nz or phone (04) 463-5562.

Financial Markets and Corporate Governance Conference, 3-5 April 2013

Date: 3–5 April 2013

Time: 9.00 am


wellington views

Financial Markets and Corporate Governance Conference 2013

The 4th Conference on Financial Markets and Corporate Governance will be held on Thursday 4 April and Friday 5 April in Wellington at Rydges Wellington, 75 Featherston Street.

Papers related to all aspects of Corporate Finance, Investments, Capital Markets, Financial Reporting, Corporate Governance and related areas will be presented and discussed. Note: the conference will be preceded by a one day Symposium providing PhD students with opportunities to receive high quality feedback about their academic work.

Additional FMCG Conference Information

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Information Events

Victoria Business School Information Evening

Date: 19 November 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

We offer a range of professional postgraduate and post-experience programmes designed to accommodate working professionals.

With options for evening classes or block courses, you can fit your studies around full time work.

Victoria Business School's programmes include Certificates, Diplomas and Masters in:

  • Professional Economics
  • Applied Finance
  • Financial Markets Analysis
  • Financial Analysis
  • Treasury Management
  • Business Administration
  • Human Resource Management
  • Marketing
  • Management Studies
  • Professional Accounting
  • Archives & Records Management
  • Information Studies
  • Information Management
  • e-Government
  • Public Policy
  • Public Management

Come along to our Information Evening, and find out if there is a programme of study that's right for you.

Prospective Student Forum: BCom Honours in HRIR or Management

Date: 2 October 2013

Time: 4.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

 SOM-Honours flyer

Hosted by the School of Management. RSVP to megan.key@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Information Systems: Honours in 2014

Date: 25 September 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Floor MZ05

SIM Flyer 

 

Hosted by the School of Information Management; RSVP to sim@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Accounting Honours Info Session

Date: 18 September 2013

Time: 4.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House. Level 12 Boardroom

Hosted by: Trish Keeper, School of Accounting and Commercial Law

  • Have you ever thought about studying honours in Accounting in 2014 -- or in the future -- and want to know more?
  • Did you know that NZICA now recognises a full time year of honours study as equivalent to the first year of the three-year CA practical experience requirements?

An information session will be held on Wednesday 18 September, starting at 4.30pm. Pizza and soft drinks will be provided

Please RSVP acceptances to rebekah.sage@vuw.ac.nz by Monday 16 September for catering purposes.

Contact trish.keeper@vuw.ac.nz for more information about studying honours in Accounting.

Get Connected @ the 2013 VBS Executive Careers Expo

Date: 12 September 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Floor

Careers Expo 2012

Victoria University produces exceptionally capable and well-grounded graduates with high level analytical and problem solving skills.

The Victoria Business School Executive Careers Expo is specifically designed for students of our taught Masters and Diploma programmes, and mid-career executive alumni with five or more years of work experience.

This event is an annual opportunity for you to showcase your potential and network with potential employers, so bring along your CV. Refreshments will be provided.

The Victoria Business School Careers Expo is held in association with Victoria Career Development and Employment, and Victoria Alumni Relations. RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz.

Future Me - Career Opportunities at ASB

Date: 21 August 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: HU LT119, Hunter Building, Kelburn Campus

The team from ASB will be visiting campus to share information about their graduate programme, Future Me. Hear from current grads, find out more about the company, discover what ASB look for when hiring grads and learn some key tips for successful job applications.

A great opportunity to ask any questions you may have and meet representatives from the firm.

For more info: https://careerhub.victoria.ac.nz

Business Case Competition: Information Evening

Date: 4 April 2013

Time: 6.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, RHG01


Deloitte logoVictoria Business School, in association with the Victoria University Consulting Club, is hosting a business case competition.

Sponsored by Deloitte, this contest gives groups of four students an opportunity to compete against each other in a collegial and supportive environment; find out more about this great student opportunity.

Competition winners will represent Victoria University in the Student Development Society National League Business Case Competition, with rounds held in Auckland, Canterbury, Wellington and Queenstown (Note: expenses paid).

Register your interest with the Victoria University Student Consulting Club, or find out more at our Information Evening -- if you don't have a team this is a chance to find one:

  • Thursday April 4, from 6.30 pm
  • Rutherford House, RHG01

Master of Information Management Welcome Function

Date: 21 March 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Floor

  • Come and join us for a drink and nibbles

  • Meet the rest of the MIM family

  • Learn about the latest research discoveries made by our students

Each year we hold a welcome function for new Master of Information Management (MIM) students to meet earlier student cohorts, including alumni. We also encourage our students to bring their bosses and/or an interested colleague. This serves to indicate to your bosses that you are busy improving your qualifications and enhancing your marketability. And your buddies at work might also welcome the opportunity to join you.

At this year’s function we will be highlighting recent research undertaken by two of our students:

  1. Madalin Ciubotaru – Critical Success factors in ERP implementations
    The chances of success in ERP implementations can be increased by ensuring the project receives a high level of executive and project sponsor support, as well as good, clear communication. This case study explores one such instance.
  2. Holger Spill – Complexity and new software product development
    This investigation found that companies with complex innovation challenges have more iterative software development, flexible internal processes, nimbleness in decision-making and re-prioritisation.

Hosted by the School of Information Management. Get your drinks early on the Mezzanine floor, as proceedings start at 5.45pm

RSVP to usha.varatharaju@vuw.ac.nz by Tuesday 19 March for catering purposes.

 

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Other Events at Victoria

Beta Alpha Psi - Mock Interviews

Date: 17 March 2014

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level

The Victoria chapter of Beta Alpha Psi invites members to their first professional event of 2014, "Mock Interviews", which will be worth one professional point.

  • Each employer will ask a series of questions similar to those in one of their typical interviews, then provide each member with feedback on their performance
  • After 15 minutes, each group will rotate to the next employer
  • The event will conclude with drinks and nibbles, providing an opportunity to network and talk further with employers

Confirmed employers attending include:

  • Audit NZ
  • Bank of New Zealand
  • Enst & Young
  • Deloitte
  • FNZ
  • PriceWaterhouseCoopers

Further details from the Beta Alpha Psi website »

 

Business Case Competition: Information Session

Date: 12 March 2014

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

An invitation for Victoria University undergrad students from all disciplines to find out about the 2014 Business Case Competition.

The opening event of the VBS Business Case Competition, for teams of Victoria University undergrads across all disciplines, will be held at Rutherford House on Saturday 15 March.

  • Information session on Wednesday 12 March, Level 12 Boardroom of Rutherford House, from 5.00-5.30pm
  • Entries close Thursday 13 March @ midday
  • Register or get further details by emailing commerce@vuw.ac.nz

The VBS Business Case Competition will select a team to compete in the first round of the SDS National League:

  • hone your presentation & analytical skills
  • get noticed by judges from top consulting & finance companies
  • test yourself against the best from New Zealand, and be in with a chance to compete in the international showdown in Queenstown

There will also be a second VBS Business Case Competition to select a team for Round Two of the National League during May.

In 2013 there were three events in the Student Development Society National League, plus a fourth International Case Competition held over a full week in Queenstown.

The team sent to compete (with all expenses paid) was selected during the Victoria Business Case Competition in April.


Ideas on Tap: Research Talks at The Thistle Inn

Date: 25 February 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon

Ideas on Tap image

The Role of Information Technology in Business Productivity: It's more important than you think

In a world where organisations are in constant movement, the role of IT becomes more significant than ever. For a long time, managers have invested in IT to increase the productivity of their firm. What they might not have realised is that certain ways of doing so also increases dramatically their capacity to capitalise on reorganisation efforts. The ability of the firm to benefit from organisational change is highly dependent on the quality of its IT resources.

Professor Benoit Aubert will discuss the role IT plays in productivity improvement and in the capacity of the firm to innovate. Research results provide guidelines for managers to help them get the most benefits from these investments.

  • Date: Tuesday 25 February
  • Time: 5.30pm (for a 5.45pm start)
  • Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Wellington
  • RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz or call 04-463 6888

Get yourself a drink from the cash bar and join us for this informal talk about research carried out at Victoria Business School.

About Professor Benoit Aubert

Benoit A. Aubert is Professor of Information Systems in the School of Information Management. His work investigates the management of IT in organisations. Previously, he has been Professor at HEC Montreal (the first Business School in Canada) and CEO of CIRANO (a university-enterprise joint venture).

The 2013 Public Finance Debates - 3

Date: 2 December 2013

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Debaters: A/Professor Rhema Vaithianthan (Proponent) vs. Professor John Gibson (Opponent); commentary from Dr Alison O'Connell

Debate 3: "It’s time … New Zealand adopted a social insurance approach to welfare"

A series of three debates organised by the Chair in Public Finance (Victoria University of Wellington) and the Government Economics Network (GEN), based on the following propositions:

  1. "It’s time … to tax the internet"
  2. "It’s time … New Zealand extended charging for public infrastructure"
  3. "It’s time … New Zealand adopted a social insurance approach to welfare"

These debates aim to provide opportunities for informed discussion, rather than political rhetoric. All speakers have been asked to either strongly make the case for or against a proposition to clarify the debate, separately from their personal views, and an independant commentator will provide some "middle ground" comments and stimulus for discussion and Q&A with the audience.

In the final debate of this series, the arguments will centre around whether "It’s time … New Zealand adopted a social insurance approach to welfare"

Several countries provide working-age welfare and retirement income funded from specific earnings-related ‘contributions’ (taxes) rather than funded out of general tax revenues as in New Zealand. These contributions are also sometimes related to the individual welfare payments received by beneficiaries, though this link can be ‘loose’ (as in the UK) or stronger (as in the Netherlands). What are the merits of each and should NZ continue to avoid social security taxes on labour? Or should NZ copy the ‘Kiwisaver approach’ applied to retirement income, and apply it also to working-age welfare where some benefits are directly tied to individual’s ‘welfare accounts’?

Note that the views and arguments presented should not be attributed to, or associated with, those agencies employing any of the speakers.

Refreshments will be provided from 4.30-5.30pm after the debate to facilitate informal discussions; to reserve a place RSVP to cherry.chang@vuw.ac.nz with the subject heading "Debate 3" by Friday 2 December.

Staff and postgraduate students are most welcome – RSVP or call the Chair in Public Finance Administrator, extension 9656.

Commerce Teachers Professional Development Day

Date: 22 November 2013

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Lecture Theatre 3, Rutherford House

Secondary School Commerce Teachers:  Professional Development Day at Victoria Business School

Accounting, Economics, and Business Studies teachers are invited to Victoria Business School for a Professional Development Day.

Topics will include digital learning, macro and micro economic issues, the long-term fiscal process, economics of disasters, and productivity.

Speakers will be drawn from Victoria Business School, The Treasury, and the Productivity Commission.

Selected Resources

Document File size File type
Professional Development Day Programme  (updated 19 November) 120 KB PDF

The 2013 Public Finance Debates - 2

Date: 12 November 2013

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: PwC, Level 16, 113-119 The Terrace, Wellington

Debaters: Geoff Cooper, Auckland Council Chief Economist (Proponent) vs. Peter Conway, Council of Trade Unions (Opponent); commentary from Chris Money, PwC

Debate 2: "It’s time … New Zealand extended charging for public infrastructure"

A series of three debates organised by the Chair in Public Finance (Victoria University of Wellington) and the Government Economics Network (GEN), based on the following propositions:

  1. "It’s time … to tax the internet"
  2. "It’s time … New Zealand extended charging for public infrastructure"
  3. "It’s time … New Zealand adopted a social insurance approach to welfare"

These debates aim to provide opportunities for informed discussion, rather than political rhetoric. All speakers have been asked to either strongly make the case for or against a proposition to clarify the debate, separately from their personal views, and an independant commentator will provide some "middle ground" comments and stimulus for discussion and Q&A with the audience.

In the second debate of this series, the arguments will centre around whether "It’s time … New Zealand extended charging for public infrastructure".

Various 'big public infrastructure' projects in New Zealand (e.g. Auckland rapid transit, new harbour crossing, Transmission Gully) are likely to require substantial funding in the near future if they go ahead. Also, Auckland (and to some extent, Wellington) suffer considerable road congestion presently. Is it time to start road congestion charging and/or other types of infrastructure user charge to fund these investments and to enable greater infrastructure investment than a tax/debt constrained government could otherwise afford? What are the pros and cons?

Refreshments will be provided from 4.30-5.30pm following the debate to facilitate informal discussions; to reserve a place RSVP to cherry.chang@vuw.ac.nz with the subject heading "Debate 2" by 11 November.

Staff and postgraduate students are most welcome -- please RSVP or call the Chair in Public Finance Administrator, extension 9656.

Ideas on Tap: Research Talks at The Thistle Inn

Date: 23 October 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon


Ideas on Tap logo

Sports Welfare - A necessary evil or an unnecessary distortion?

The funding of elite sports events, stadia and professional sports teams from the public purse tends to generate vigorous debate about the provision of what has been called sports welfare. This talk sets sports welfare in the context of multiple other sources of funding for sport at all levels, and in the context of why and how sport attracts and benefits from such funding.

Professor Davies will outline a view that framing the narrative about sport provision, in terms of welfare rather than investment, not only distorts the debate, but may well lead to adverse consequences for sport and the community.

  • Date: Wednesday 23 October
  • Time: 5.30pm (for a 5.45pm start)
  • Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Wellington
  • RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz or call 04-463 6888

Grab a drink from the cash bar and join us for this informal talk about research carried out at Victoria Business School.

About Professor John Davies

John Davies is a Professor of Management and Associate Dean, International and Executive Education at Victoria Business School. His interests include involvement in sport, as a member of the Rugby Board of the Wellington Rugby Football Union, and a past President of both the WRFU and of the Poneke Football Club, Wellington's leading multi-cultural sports club.

The 2013 Public Finance Debates - 1

Date: 23 October 2013

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2

Debaters: Dr Toby Daglish (Proponent) vs. Dr Grant Scobie (Opponent); commentary from Dr Lisa Marriott (School of Accounting and Commercial Law)

Debate 1: "It’s time … to tax the internet"

A series of three debates organised by the Chair in Public Finance (Victoria University of Wellington) and the Government Economics Network (GEN), based on the following propositions:

  1. "It’s time … to tax the internet"
  2. "It’s time … New Zealand extended charging for public infrastructure"
  3. "It’s time … New Zealand adopted a social insurance approach to welfare"

These debates aim to provide opportunities for informed discussion, rather than political rhetoric. All speakers have been asked to either strongly make the case for or against a proposition to clarify the debate, separately from their personal views, and an independant commentator will provide some "middle ground" comments and stimulus for discussion and Q&A with the audience.

In the first debate of this series, the arguments will centre around whether "It’s time … to tax the internet"

GST, as part of a broad-based low-rate system with few exemptions, should avoid the distortion of taxing some suppliers (domestic) and not others (overseas retailers). Increasing internet use will deepen and widen this distortion. On the other hand, NZ’s natural trade impediment of ‘distance from markets’ raises consumer prices and can generate location specific rent for domestic producers of NZ consumer goods versus foreign suppliers. The GST exemption for foreign internet retailers therefore merely counteracts this effective subsidy to domestic producers and lowers prices for NZ consumers. So, who is right?

Note that the views and arguments presented should not be attributed to, or associated with, those agencies employing any of the speakers.

Refreshments will be provided from 4:30-5:30pm after the debate to facilitate informal discussions; to reserve a place RSVP to cherry.chang@vuw.ac.nz with the subject heading "Debate 1" by Oct 21.

Staff and postgraduate students are most welcome – please RSVP or call the Chair in Public Finance Administrator, extension 9656.

Ideas on Tap: Research Talks at The Thistle Inn

Date: 25 September 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon

Ideas on Tap image

Who's to Blame? The Psychology Behind Consumer Reactions to Product Crises

With the recent Fonterra product crisis, an area of great importance is understanding how consumers react to a product crisis. What psychological processes influence how consumers react to a crisis, including the assessment of blame?

Dan Laufer, Associate Professor of Marketing, shares his research on this highly topical subject.

  • Date: Wednesday 25 September
  • Time: 5.30pm
  • Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon. Grab a drink from the cash bar and join us for this informal talk about research carried out at Victoria Business School
  • RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz or call 04-463 6888

About Dan Laufer:

Dan Laufer is an Associate Professor of Marketing at Victoria University of Wellington. He also has experience teaching at leading universities in the US, Germany, South Korea, Canada, Mexico and Israel. Dan's area of expertise is crisis management and his articles have appeared in both academic and managerial journals, including the top journals in the fields of public relations and marketing.

His recent focus has been on topics relating to the psychology of blame and crisis communications, and his published research involves data collected from consumers around the world. Dan also teaches executive courses on crisis management at leading universities worldwide, and is quoted frequently as a crisis management expert in the global media including the Wall Street Journal, Associated Press, CNN, Sina News in China, Nikkei Business Daily in Japan, the Korea Times in South Korea, and the NZ Herald.

Exploring the Public Transport Spine Study: Options for Wellington

Date: 24 September 2013

Time: 5.40 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2


Sustainable


Wellington’s public transport future is being created – what are our options? Would light rail or bus rapid transit be good for our city? Come along and join the conversation.

Panel members will briefly outline the Wellington Public Transport Spine Study and the proposed bus rapid transit and light rail options. The floor will then be opened for questions and discussion.

The purpose of this forum is to answer questions about Wellington’s public transport options, and encourage engagement before public submissions on the Spine Study close on 30 September.

Speakers:

Jane Davis is the general manager of strategy and community engagement at Greater Wellington Regional Council. Jane will speak on the core findings of the Spine Study.

Brent Efford is NZ agent for the UK-based Light Rail Transit Association. Brent completed a Winston Churchill Fellowship study tour of US light rail installations in 2003 and a follow-up tour in 2009. He was a member of the reference group for the Spine Study and was formerly sustainability rep on the Wellington Regional Transport Committee. He is also information officer for local advocacy group Trams-Action and publishes the enthusiast magazine Tramway Topics and a weekly email newsletter KiwiTram.

Tom Pettit is a Master of Public Policy student at the School of Government, graduating this spring. He has thoroughly re-analysed the Spine Study in the past year based on international evidence. His interest in transport is academic, rather than political, and he argues that Wellingtonians deserve better evidence to make important choices about their transport future.

Tony Randle is a member of the reference group for the Spine Study. Tony is a public transit advocate from Johnsonville and has been involved in the public transport debate in Wellington for many years. Tony will be talking about the Spine Study and the merits of bus rapid transit for Wellington City.

Hosted by the School of Government. All welcome, RSVP not required.

Increasing Inequality: Causes, Consequences and Responses

Date: 18 July 2013

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Rydges, Featherston Street, Wellington

The latest research and policy debates on inequality issues will be the focus of an Institute for Government and Policy Studies (IGPS) forum on Thursday 18 July.

There has been much debate, both internationally and here in New Zealand, over why income inequality has increased across much of the developed world during the past few decades, whether it matters and what, if anything, should be done about it.

Three main issues will be under the spotlight:

  1. The causes and consequences of the rise of income inequality in most OECD countries since the 1980s
  2. How some of the negative social impacts of inequality might be mitigated
  3. Options for reducing income inequality and which, if any, have merit

Many of the speakers at the forum contributed to a major book on the issue, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, edited by Max Rashbrooke, which was released in June.

Speakers include Dr Michael Forster (OECD), Professor Robert H. Wade (London School of Economics) and Dr Cathy Wylie (New Zealand Council for Educational Research). 

  • Date: Thursday 18 July
  • Venue: Rydges, 75 Featherston Street, Wellington
  • Time: 8.30am-5pm
  • Cost: $90 (incl GST)

Registration and Programme details are available from the Institute for Government and Policy Studies website, or contact Amanda Cunningham, amanda.cunningham@vuw.ac.nz or phone (04) 463 6588.

New Zealand National Integrity System Assessment Public Forum

Date: 8 May 2013

Time: 8.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

This seminar will be opened by Hon Dr Jonathan Coleman, Minister of State Services and Hon Phil Goff, the Opposition Spokesperson State Services

Background:

A public forum, co-hosted with Transparency International New Zealand, on some of the emergent findings of the 2013 Integrity Plus National Integrity Assessment for New Zealand. Come and be part of the conversation keeping New Zealand's integrity as good as it's perceived.

A National Integrity System Assessment evaluates key 'pillars' in a country's governance system, both in terms of their internal corruption risks and in terms of their contribution to fighting corruption in society at large. This assessment is unprecedented for its scope and depth.

Co-hosted by the School of Government; all are welcome. This seminar will be followed by morning tea; if you will be attending, please RSVP to alexandra@transparency.org.nz to reserve a place.

Special Presentation of the Asian Development Outlook Report 2013

Date: 11 April 2013

Time: 1.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW501

Speakers: Dr Joseph E. Zveglich Jr., Assistant Chief Economist at the Asian Development Bank

Background:

ADB’s flagship economic publication Asian Development Outlook 2013 (ADO) provides a comprehensive analysis of macroeconomic issues in developing Asia, with growth projections by country and region. This year's ADO special theme chapter, "Asia’s Energy Challenge", explores how the region can ensure adequate, accessible, clean energy to achieve its growth potential.

Dr Joe Zveglich, the Asian Development Bank's Assistant Chief Economist, will address these issues and others at this launch of the Asian Development Outlook 2013, ADB’s flagship economic publication. Dr Zveglich will present the key findings of the report and address questions including:

  1. What are the immediate economic prospects for developing Asia and what risks lie ahead?
  2. What does the recent resilience of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations bloc of economies have to offer the region?
  3. How has the region been affected by monetary easing policy in the mature economies?
  4. Will the region be able to secure sufficient affordable energy to maintain rapid growth in the decades ahead?
  5. How can developing Asia adjust its energy needs to ensure environmental sustainability?
  6. What role can regional energy integration play in solving the region’s energy problems?

Bio:

Joseph E. Zveglich Jr. is Assistant Chief Economist of the Asian Development Bank, which he joined in 1998. He manages the macroeconomic and finance research division of the Economics and Research Department. Dr. Zveglich oversees the preparation of the annual Asian Development Outlook and the Asian Development Outlook Update, ADB's flagship publications forecasting economic trends in the region. He also chairs the Regional Economic Outlook Task Force, which advises ADB management on Developing Asia's economic prospects. Dr. Zveglich earned his PhD and Master of Arts degree at Harvard University, graduating summa cum laude.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. All are welcome to attend; RSVP not required.

The Public Finance Debates - 1

Date: 28 August 2012

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Debaters: Bryce Wilkinson (Proponent) vs. Bill Rosenberg (Opponent)

Debate 1: "A 0% cap on real per capita government spending growth would be a sensible objective for New Zealand"

Professor Norman Gemmell (Chair in Public Finance, Victoria) and Dr Girol Karacaoglu (Head, GEN) chair a series of four debates based around some prominent NZ public finance "key numbers".

These debates aim to provide opportunities for informed discussion, rather than political rhetoric. All speakers have been asked to either strongly make the case for or against a proposition to clarify the debate, separately from their personal views, and we would like to thank all the speakers in advance for their enthusiasm and participation. Without their input, this new venture in 'policy debates' would not be possible.

In this first debate, the arguments will centre around whether public spending should expand or contract, and how fast. This is a politically charged subject, with different views appearing to depend as much on personal preferences or political ideology as on rational economic principles. However most agree that some "fiscal rules" are required to ensure that the government's budget (spending, tax revenues and deficits) is sustainable both now and into the future. Recent New Zealand governments have used public debt targets as a "rule" for achieving this. However, targeting a specific growth rate for public spending is an alternative: a "public spending cap" aims to limit that growth to a specified maximum.

The current New Zealand government's confidence and supply agreement between National and ACT describes a "spending cap" that would limit public spending so that it only grows to allow for the effects of inflation and populations growth (i.e. constant real per capita spending). This debate will aim to assess the economic arguments for and against this spending objective in the current New Zealand context utilising evidence, where possible, from spending caps implemented elsewhere.

Note that the views and arguments presented should not be attributed to, or associated with, those agencies employing any of the speakers.

Drinks and canapés will be provided from 5:30-6:30pm after the debate to facilitate informal discussions; to reserve a place RSVP to cpf-info@vuw.ac.nz by Thursday 23 August (updated).

Staff and postgraduate students are most welcome – please RSVP or call the Administrator of Chair in Public Finance, extension 9656.

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Public Lectures

Age Friendly Workplaces

Date: 28 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Professor Simon Biggs, Professor of Gerontology and Social Policy, Melbourne University

Background:

This presentation will examine, amongst other things, recent findings from the international literature on the prevalence of elder mistreatment and its implications. The lecture will be chaired by Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, Victoria University.

Bio:

Professor Biggs is a renowned researcher on the policy implications of population ageing. His recent research includes a World Health Organisation’s "Age friendly cities" project; an ESCR study of baby boomers; uses of adaptive technology in later life; and a UK National Prevalence Study on elder abuse and neglect.

He is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Ageing Societies, and his current focus is the analysis of international and national social policy.

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and the New Zealand Association of Gerontology. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Elder Abuse, Social Ageism and Human Rights

Date: 18 February 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Professor Simon Biggs, Professor of Gerontology and Social Policy, Melbourne University

Background:

This presentation will examine, amongst other things, recent findings from the international literature on the prevalence of elder mistreatment and its implications. The lecture will be chaired by Dr Michael Macaulay, Associate Professor in Public Management, Victoria University.

Bio:

Professor Biggs is a renowned researcher on the policy implications of population ageing. His recent research includes a World Health Organisation’s "Age friendly cities" project; an ESCR study of baby boomers; uses of adaptive technology in later life; and a UK National Prevalence Study on elder abuse and neglect.

He is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Ageing Societies, and his current focus is the analysis of international and national social policy.

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and the New Zealand Association of Gerontology. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Development, Challenge of China's Agriculture

Date: 18 February 2014

Time: 4.30 pm

Venue: Beehive Theatrette, Parliament Buildings, Wellington

Hon Nathan Guy, Minister of Primary Industries, invites you to attend a lecture by Mr Chen Xiwen, Deputy Head (Minister-level) and Director of the Office, Central Rural Work Leading Group and Deputy Director of the Office, Central Leading Group on Financial and Economic Affairs.

Background:

Chen Xiwen is a highly respected agricultural economist who has made major contributions to China’s economic policy making on agricultural development and the rural economy.

Throughout his career he has engaged in research on issues relating to rural economic theory and policy. Since the 1980s he has participated in drafting most of China’s key documents in this area (most notably China’s No. 1 Central Document on agricultural development each year) for both the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and the State Council.

He has published extensively and is frequently interviewed and quoted in the media. He has won the prestigious Sun Yefang Economics Awards, and in 1992, he was awarded a special stipend from the Chinese Government for his contribution and expertise.

  • What: Development, Challenge of China’s Agriculture
  • When: 4.30pm, Tuesday 18 February 2014
  • Where: Beehive Theatrette Parliament Buildings, Wellington
  • RSVP (essential for seating and security purposes): emily@silvereyecomms.co.nz or phone Emily Rowe on 027 344 0664
Document File size File type
Hon Nathan Guy - Invitation 100 KB PDF

In association with Victoria Business School, the New Zealand Contemporary China Research Centre, and Silvereye Communications Limited

Lessons from the Financial Crisis: A New World Order

Date: 10 February 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1


Victoria University of Wellington invites you to a Public Lecture by Lord King of Lothbury, the Reserve Bank Professorial Fellow in Monetary and Financial Economics.

  • Date: Monday, 10 February 2014
  • Reception: 5.30-6.00pm
  • Lecture: 6.00pm-7.00pm (including questions)
  • Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1, Victoria University

Abstract

The financial crisis of 2007-09 had a devastating effect on the advanced economies and global repercussions. Preventing another crisis will involve much more than reform of the banking sector; it may require no less than a new world order for economic relations among countries.

About Lord King of Lothbury

Lord King of LothburyLord King of Lothbury is currently a distinguished visiting professor at New York University Stern School of Business and New York University School of Law.

He served as Governor of the Bank of England and Chairman of the Monetary Policy Committee and Financial Policy Committee from 2003-June 2013.

He was previously Deputy Governor from 1998 to 2003, Chief Economist and Executive Director from 1991, and non-executive director of the Bank from 1990 to 1991.

Lord King of Lothbury is visiting New Zealand as the Reserve Bank Professorial Fellow in Monetary and Financial Economics.

 

RSVP by Monday, 27 January 2014 to deborah.osullivan@vuw.ac.nz with "Lord King" in the subject line, or telephone (04) 463 7431.

The Bourgeois Virtues and the Teaching of Business

Date: 18 December 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Ground Floor Lecture Theatre

SEF Invitation

Professor Morris Altman, Head of the School of Economics and Finance, warmly invites you to a public lecture by Professor Deirdre McCloskey, Professor of Economics, History, English and Communication at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

The Bourgeois Virtues and the Teaching of Business

Greed is not good. So says Professor Deirdre McCloskey, a world-renowned economist, historian, ethicist, and author.

Schools of business have tended too often, she argues, to train managers to be less than professional, putting profit and prudence ahead of any of the other virtues of a human life.

Professor McCloskey presents the findings from her pathbreaking book of 2006, The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce, that a life in market-tested innovation and supply can be -- and normally is -- virtuous, on the most classical grounds.

  • Date: Wednesday 18 December 2013
  • Time: 5.30pm - 7.00pm
  • Venue: Rutherford House, Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, 23 Lambton Quay (Pipitea Campus)
  • RVSP to Ingrid.Watts@vuw.ac.nz  or phone 04-463 5380 by Friday, 13 December 2013. Light refreshments will be provided.

About Professor Deirdre McCloskey

Professor Deirdre N. McCloskey Deirdre N. McCloskey is a Distinguished Professor of Economics, History, English, and Communication at the University of Illinois, Chicago (UIC), and is well known for her work in Economic History and Methodology.

She is also adjunct professor of Philosophy and Classics at UIC, and for five years was a visiting Professor of Philosophy at Erasmus University, Rotterdam. Since October 2007 she has received six honorary doctorates.

In 2013, she received the Julian L. Simon Memorial Award from the Competitive Enterprise Institute for her work examining factors in history that led to advancement in human achievement and prosperity.

 

Dollar, Euro, Renminbi: The Future of the International Monetary System

Date: 5 December 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1

Victoria University of Wellington and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand invite you to a Professorial Fellowship in Monetary and Financial Economics Programme Public Lecture by Professor Barry Eichengreen, Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley.

Dollar, Euro, Renminbi: The Future of the International Monetary System

Recent political events in the United States (the government shutdown, the debt ceiling debate) raise questions about the future of the dollar as an international currency.

In this lecture Professor Eichengreen will assess the dollar’s prospects of an international unit of account, means of payment and store of value, and ask what its trials and tribulations imply for the future of the international monetary and financial system.

  • Reception: 5.30–6.00pm
  • Lecture: 6.00–7.00pm (including questions)
Document File size File type
Invitation to Professor Eichengreen's Lecture  400 KB PDF

RSVP by Thursday, 28 November to deborah.osullivan@vuw.ac.nz with "Eichengreen" in the subject line, or telephone (04) 463 7431.

About Professor Barry Eichengreen

Professor Barry EichengreenBarry Eichengreen is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1987. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts) and Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy (London, England).

Professor Eichengreen is the convener of the Bellagio Group of academics and economic officials and chair of the Academic Advisory Committee of the Peterson Institute of International Economics.

He has held Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships and been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Palo Alto) and the Institute for Advanced Study (Berlin). He is a regular monthly columnist for Project Syndicate.

His most recent books are From Miracle to Maturity: The Growth of the Korean Economy with Dwight H. Perkins and Kwanho Shin (2012) and Exorbitant Privilege: The Rise and Fall of the Dollar and the Future of the International Monetary System (2011), which was shortlisted for the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award in 2011.

It’s Just Common Sense, Right? So Why is it so Uncommon?

Date: 14 November 2013

Time: 6.00 pm

Venue: Kelburn Campus, Hunter Council Chamber, Hunter Building

Professor Pat Walsh, Vice-Chancellor of Victoria University of Wellington, invites you to the Inaugural Professorial Lecture to be given by Vicky Mabin, Professor of Management.

It's just common sense, right? So why is it so uncommon?

Divide and conquer may work in battle, but doesn‘t usually work for organisations, where silo thinking and turf wars can lead to poor overall performance. When constraints, complexity and conflicts are managed well, organisations perform significantly better.

Drawing on examples from sectors as diverse as manufacturing, health, resource management and education, Professor Vicky Mabin will illustrate how managing these factors using Goldratt‘s theory of constraints can improve organisational and personal performance.

Refreshments will be served following the lecture.

  • When: 6pm, Tuesday 12 November
  • Where: Hunter Council Chamber, Level 2, Hunter Building, Gate 1 or 2, Kelburn Parade, Wellington
  • RSVP: by Friday 8 November. Phone 04-463 6390 or email rsvp@vuw.ac.nz with 'Mabin' in the subject line

Global Competition and Emerging Economies: The Growing Importance of Emerging-Market Firms in Global Value-Chains

Date: 30 October 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1

Invitation to a public lecture at Victoria Business School

Professor Bob Buckle, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Commerce at Victoria Business School, invites you to a lecture by Professor Mike Kotabe, Washburn Chair Professor of International Business and Marketing at the Fox School of Business and Management at Temple University, Philadelphia.

Global Competition and Emerging Economies: The Growing Importance of Emerging-Market Firms in Global Value-Chains

One of the emerging phenomena of global competition is the increasing participation of firms from emerging economies (EMCs) in various industries and across value chain activities. Professor Kotabe will talk about how EMCs have built their competitive advantage in the global market. Research consistently points to two-pronged strategies, one based on niche-marketing and the other on cash-rich positions. By doing so, EMCs have developed different marketing strategies for different (i.e., developed vs. developing / emerging) markets and learned the virtue of becoming long-term suppliers to established multinationals. Professor Kotabe will explain how these strategies have played out over time. Lessons learned from those EMCs will be shared.

  • Date: Wednesday 30 October 2013.
  • Time: 5.30pm for pre-lecture refreshments, followed by the lecture from 6pm-7pm.
  • Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1, (Stout Street entrance to the Law School), Wellington. A map can be found on our website.
  • RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz or phone 04-463 6888 by Friday 25 October.

About Professor Mike Kotabe

Professor Mike KotabeMasaaki "Mike" Kotabe holds the Washburn Chair Professorship in International Business and Marketing at the Fox School of Business and Management at Temple University, and currently serves as the Editor of the Journal of International Management. Prior to joining Temple University in 1998, he was Ambassador Edward Clark Centennial Endowed Fellow and Professor of Marketing and International Business at the University of Texas at Austin.

Dr Kotabe served as the Vice President of the Academy of International Business in 1997-98, and was elected a Fellow of the Academy of International Business in 1998 for his significant contribution to international business research and education. He has written over 100 scholarly publications.

His research work has appeared in such journals as the Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Marketing, Strategic Management, and Academy of Management Journal. His books include Global Sourcing Strategy: R&D, Manufacturing, Marketing Interfaces (1992), Japanese Distribution System (1993), Anticompetitive Practices in Japan (1996), MERCOSUR and Beyond (1997), Market Revolution in Latin America: Beyond Mexico (2001), Emerging Issues in International Business Research (2002), Global Supply Chain Management (2006), and Global Marketing Management, 6th ed. (2014).

Dr Kotabe also serves / has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Marketing, the Journal of International Business Studies, the Journal of International Marketing, the Journal of World Business, the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Advances in International Management, the Journal of Business Research, and the Thunderbird International Business Review, among others. He also serves as an Advisor to the Institute of Industrial Policy Studies (IPS) National Competitiveness Report.

He has lectured widely at various business schools around the world, including Austria, Germany, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, China, Japan, Korea, Indonesia, and Turkey. For his research, he has worked closely with leading companies such as AT&T, Kohler, NEC, Nissan, Philips, Seven&i Holdings (parent of 7-Eleven stores), and Sony, and served as advisor to the United Nations’ and World Trade Organization’s Executive Forum on National Export Strategies.

 

The Green Economy: Mythical or Meaningful

Date: 6 August 2013

Time: 6.30 pm

Venue: Soundings Theatre, Te Papa


The 2013 Sir Frank Holmes Memorial Lecture will be delivered by Professor Daniel Fiorino, American University, Washington

Abstract:

The concept of "the green economy" has drawn attention recently as a way to reconcile the political imperative for economic development with the inherent limits of global and regional ecosystems and resources. As with the sustainability concept, to which it is closely related, critics argue that the idea of a green economy is unrealistic and simply an excuse for avoiding painful choices. In contrast, advocates for green growth view it as a technologically and financially realistic set of strategies for balancing growth with the environment. What is the green economy? Does it stand up under scrutiny? What are the alternatives to a green economy?

Bio:

Daniel J. Fiorino is the Director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Executive in Residence in the School of Public Affairs at American University. As a faculty member in the Department of Public Administration and Policy, he teaches courses on environmental policy, energy and climate change, environmental sustainability, and public management. Dan is the author or co-author of four books and some three dozen articles and book chapters in his field.

His book, The New Environmental Regulation, won the Brownlow Award of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) for “excellence in public administration literature” in 2007. Altogether his publications have received nine national and international awards from the American Society for Public Administration, Policy Studies Organization, Academy of Management, and NAPA. In 2009 he was a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and he also serves as an advisor on environmental and sustainability issues.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. This lecture will be preceded by a reception from 5.45pm; attendance is free, but spaces are limited.

RSVP with ‘Holmes’ in the subject line to rsvp@vuw.ac.nz or phone 04 472 1000 by Friday 2 August.

Entry into China: Do Small Firms Do Better and Why?

Date: 29 July 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2


Invitation to a public lecture at Victoria Business School

Professor Bob Buckle, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Commerce at Victoria Business School, invites you to a lecture by Professor Marshall W. Meyer, Tsai Wan-Tsai Professor in the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Entry Into China: Do Small Firms do Better and Why?

The conventional wisdom is that larger firms with greater firepower do better when they invest abroad. This is a version of the MITI model of outward FDI, where the winners in the domestic market "go out" once they have achieved market dominance at home.

The question is whether China inverts the conventional wisdom such that smaller firms do better. Several strands of research point in this direction including results on 

  1. firm size and successful entry into China
  2. regional market concentration and firm performance within China
  3. firm decentralization and successful entry into Chinese rural markets

Overall, the evidence indicates that firms that are small or capable of acting as if they are small will do better in China. An inference is that firms based in small countries may also do better.

  • Date: Monday 29 July 2013
  • Time: 5.30-6.30pm, followed by refreshments on the mezzanine floor
  • Venue: Lecture Theatre 2, Rutherford House, Bunny Street, Wellington
  • RSVP to Kay de Malmanche or phone 04-463 6888 by Thursday 25 July

About Professor Marshall Meyer

Professor Marshall W Meyer, Tsai Wan-Tsai Professor in the Wharton School of the University of PennsylvaniaMarshall Meyer was named Tsai Wan-Tsai Professor in the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 2010, where he is also Professor of Management, Professor of Sociology, Associate Member of the Center for East Asian Studies, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China.

He has been a visiting professor in the Faculty of Business Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, and the School of Business and Management at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He was also a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation in 1993-94.

Professor Meyer is executive senior editor of Management and Organization Review, the journal of the International Association for Chinese Management Research, and a member of the editorial advisory board of the International Journal of Emerging Markets.

He was Associate Editor of Administrative Science Quarterly from 1987 to 1995 and has served on the editorial boards of the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, Contemporary Sociology, the Arnold and Caroline Rose Monograph Series of the American Sociological Association, Organization Studies, Social Science Quarterly, and Computational Statistics and Data Analysis.

Reflections on Accounting Leadership and the Development of Accounting Standards

Date: 24 July 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Please note that this event will now be held on the 2nd floor of the Reserve Bank, 2 The Terrace.


Invitation to a public lecture at Victoria Business School

Professor Bob Buckle, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Commerce at Victoria Business School, invites you to a lecture by Sir David Tweedie, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Valuation Standards Council and former Chairman of the Chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board.

Reflections on Accounting Leadership and the Development of Accounting Standards

Sir David Tweedie will discuss the struggle to change accounting standards – initially in the UK and then internationally – the politics, frustrations, and unfinished business.

  • Date: Wednesday 24 July 2013
  • Time: 5.30-6.30pm, followed by refreshments
  • Please Note Venue Change: 2nd Floor of the Reserve Bank Building, 2 The Terrace, Wellington
  • RSVP to Kay de Malmanche by Thursday 18 July

About Sir David Tweedie

Sir David TweedieSir David was educated at Edinburgh University (BCom 1966, PhD 1969) and qualified as a Scottish Chartered Accountant in 1972. After qualifying he taught accounting for six years at Edinburgh University.

He was appointed Technical Director of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland (ICAS) in 1978 and moved in 1982 to the position of national technical partner of the then Thomson McLintock & Co.

In 1987 his firm merged with Peat Marwick Mitchell & Co and he was appointed national technical partner of the merged firm – KPMG.

During this period he was also Vice Chairman and then Chairman of the UK's Auditing Practices Committee (the committee charged with setting the UK's auditing rules) from 1986 to 1990 and the UK's sole representative on the International Auditing Practices Committee from 1983 to 1988.

In 1990, in response to national concerns about the state of British financial reporting, the government and the accounting profession instituted the Accounting Standards Board to reform the UK's accounting standards and Sir David, an outspoken critic of the then accepted accounting practices, was appointed its first full-time Chairman – a post he held for 10 years while revising UK standards.

As a result of his success in the UK, in January 2001 he was selected by chairman Paul Volcker, the then Chairman of the International Accounting Standards Committee, and the other international trustees of the IASC Foundation to be the first Chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and CEO of the Foundation.

He led the Board for 10 years until his term ended in June 2011. The objective of the IASB was to produce a high quality set of accepted global accounting standards. In 2001 only a handful of countries used international standards (IFRS), but by 2011 over 120 countries (including those in the EU, most of Latin America, Australasia, Canada, Korea, and Japan) required or permitted their use.

The USA is expected to announce a path to adoption of IFRS in the next few months – a decision awaited by China, India and Japan before they move to mandatory adoption of the international standards. 

Sir David is a Fellow of the Judge Business School at Cambridge University and a visiting Professor of Accounting in the Management School at Edinburgh University, having previously held visiting professorships at the Universities of Lancaster and Bristol.

He has received honorary degrees from nine British universities. He was knighted in 1994 and has been awarded the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales’ Founding Societies Centenary Award for 1997, the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants’ Award for 1998, the International Federation of Accountants International (IFAC) Gold Service Award in 2011 and, in 2012, the International Accounting Bulletin Lifetime Achievement Award, the Japan Institute of Certified Public Accountant’s Special Award and the Outstanding Achievement Award at the Scottish Accountancy Awards – all for services to the Accounting Profession.

Sir David became President of ICAS in April 2012 and Chairman of the International Valuation Standards Council (IVSC) in October 2012. He chairs the Royal Household Audit Committee for the Sovereign Grant. He also chairs the board of trustees of Leuchie House, Scotland's charity giving respite care to those with degenerative diseases.

International Scholar Lecture: The Good News Is, You're Fired ...

Date: 15 April 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2


Invitation to a public lecture at Victoria Business School 

 

You are warmly invited to a lecture by Professor Nick Lee, Professor of Marketing and Organizational Research at Aston Business School and a 2013 Victoria Business School International Visiting Scholar.

The Good News Is, You're Fired ...

Many people think that, given the chance, they would make a pretty good manager. Similarly, most people also think that they make pretty good employees.

However, as scientists understand more about these complex workplace interactions, we find that actions which seem like the 'right' thing to do can actually lead to unintended negative effects, while actions that many might think of as harmful to the work environment actually have positive effects. Uncovering these counter-intuitive outcomes requires an approach that goes beyond the notion of 'common-sense' – what 'should' or 'shouldn't' work – to integrate insights from psychological, organisational, and even biological sciences, and bring them to bear on the environment where we spend most of our waking time: the workplace.

This lecture will explore many examples of how managers influence both good and bad employee behaviour. After all, you may be fired, but was it really your fault?

  • Date: Monday 15 April
  • Time: 5.30pm for pre-lecture refreshments, followed by the lecture from 6.00-7.00pm 
  • Venue: Lecture Theatre 2, Rutherford House, Bunny Street, Wellington
  • RSVP to jessie.johnston@vuw.ac.nz by Thursday 11 April, or phone 04-463 5330

About Professor Nick Lee

Professor of Marketing and Organizational Research Nick LeeThe School of Marketing and International Business inaugural speaker in their 2013 Distinguished Lecture Series is Professor of Marketing and Organizational Research Nick Lee from the Aston Business School. The Distinguished Lecture Series invites editors from the leading international journals in Marketing to share their cutting edge research with Victoria Business School staff, students, and alumni, as well as the local business community. Professor Lee is an alumnus of the Victoria Business School's Honours Programme in Marketing and is currently editor-in-chief of the prestigious European Journal of Marketing.

Professor Lee’s research interests are located within the psychological tradition, containing aspects of the social, cognitive, and neuroscientific approaches. Within this broad context, the specific research areas he works in centre around the concept of relationships among people, individually and in groups. His primary area of research and contribution has focused on relationships within the sales force, but he is also involved in research within the emerging field of organisational cognitive neuroscience, and has a long standing interest in measurement theory and philosophy of science.

In 2009 Professor Lee was featured in The Times as ‘one of the 15 scientists whose work will shape the future’. His research has won multiple awards, including the 2010 Joseph Lister Award for Social Science from the British Science Association, the 2005 Emerald Outstanding Special Issue Award, the 2002 EMAC Conference award for best doctoral paper, and a 2002 UK CIM/AM Research Excellence Award. He is a regular speaker at international conferences on sales and methodological issues.

International Tax Reviews and New Zealand's Tax Working Group: What can we learn?

Date: 12 March 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2


Invitation to a public lecture at Victoria Business School

You are warmly invited to a Victoria Business School Public Lecture by Dr Alan J. Auerbach, the Robert D. Burch Professor of Economics and Law and Director of the Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance:

International Tax Reviews and New Zealand's Tax
Working Group: What can we learn?

This lecture will examine the implications for tax policy in New Zealand in the light of the UK Mirrlees Review, the Australian Henry Review, and New Zealand's Tax Working Group.

About Professor Alan Auerbach:

Alan J. Auerbach is the Robert D. Burch Professor of Economics and Law, Director of the Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance, and former Chair of the Economics Department at the University of California, Berkeley.

He is also a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and previously taught at Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania, where he also served as Economics Department Chair. Professor Auerbach was Deputy Chief of Staff of the U.S. Joint Committee on Taxation in 1992 and has been a consultant to several government agencies and institutions in the United States and abroad.

A former Vice President of the American Economic Association, he was Editor of that association’s Journal of Economic Perspectives and is the founding Editor of its American Economic Journal: Economic Policy. Professor Auerbach is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the National Academy of Social Insurance, and currently Vice President of the National Tax Association, from which he received the Daniel M. Holland Medal in 2011.

Pre-lecture refreshments will be served at 5.30pm in the Rutherford House foyer, followed by the lecture from 6.00-7.00pm. RSVP to cherry.chang@vuw.ac.nz (Administrator, Chair in Public Finance), or phone 04-463 9656, for catering purposes.

Loss of Trust in Business: Causes, Consequences and Responses

Date: 25 February 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1


Invitation to a public lecture at Victoria Business School

You are warmly invited to a Victoria Business School Public Lecture by Professor Paul Healy, James R Williston Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for Research at Harvard Business School:

Loss of Trust in Business: Causes, Consequences
and Responses

In many countries, trust of business is at an historic low. Given recent economic crisis in the US and Europe, some of the reasons for this decline are understandable, but others are subtler. Recent cases and research findings provide insights into declining trust in business (as well as other institutions), its ongoing impact, and the changes required to rebuild confidence.

About Professor Paul Healy

Professor Healy’s research covers a broad range of topics including financial analysis, Wall Street research, corruption, governance, mergers and acquisitions, and business ethics. He joined Harvard Business School in 1988 after fourteen years at the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he received awards for teaching excellence in 1991, 1992 and 1997.

Professor Healy graduated from Victoria University with degrees in accounting and finance in 1976 and 1977. He has a PhD from the University of Rochester (1981), has published widely in leading academic and practitioner journals and has received numerous research awards. He is the co-author of one of the leading financial analysis textbooks, Business Analysis and Valuation, and has taught MBA and executive courses in accounting, financial analysis, corporate boards, and ethical leadership.

Light refreshments will be served at 6.30pm on the Mezzanine floor following this lecture. RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

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Seminars

Media Sentiment, Investor Sentiment, and Stock Price Sensitivity to Earnings

Date: 28 March 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Chen Chen, University of Auckland Business School

Abstract:

While prior research has focused on investor sentiment at the market level, we propose and test a measure of firm-specific investor sentiment. Specifically, we focus on the optimism and pessimism embedded in news items about the firm. Using data from Thomson Reuters News Analytics which uses a linguistic analysing engine to rate news items in real-time, we create a firm-specific measure of investor sentiment - i.e. media sentiment - by stripping out the portion of the news rating that is related to firm fundamentals.

After controlling for market-wide investor sentiment, we find that when firm-specific media sentiment is positive (negative), investors overreact to positive (negative) earnings surprises. Further, we find that this effect is concentrated in hard to value firms and cannot be explained by information contained in our sentiment measure.

Our results suggest that the tone of news items can contribute to the misvaluation of stocks, and this effect is incremental to market-wide investor sentiment.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Three of a Kind? The Emissions Trading Systems of the EU, New Zealand and Tokyo Compared

Date: 21 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Station, Level Five, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Stefan Niederhafner, Department of Political Science & International Relations, Seoul National University, South Korea

Abstract:

Even though the EU emission trading system (ETS) is the biggest and most active carbon market, it has apparent problems maintaining a stable supply and demand based price mechanism which calls into question its purpose of reducing C0₂emissions. The same problem occurs in New Zealand where prices have fallen dramatically over the past couple of years.

Comparing the carbon markets of the EU, New Zealand and Tokyo, Dr Niederhafner will investigate the differences in the designs of the systems, asking if elements can be found that would make carbon trading an actual C0₂mitigating enterprise.

Bio:

Dr Stefan Niederhafner’s research interests focus mainly on governance in multi-level systems with a special focus on the role of the local level, transnational networks, as well as of energy and climate change politics.

At undergraduate level, he teaches courses on European Integration and the EU system. On graduate level, he offers courses on EU’s foreign policy as well as global energy and environmental politics with a focus on climate change.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Environmental Policy Effectiveness in New Zealand: Inside the Black Box

Date: 14 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level Five, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Hugh Logan, environmental management and policy consultant

Abstract:

New Zealand was a rapid innovator in environmental policy during the late 1980s and early 1990s, but since then has been slow to develop policies to address environmental problems; this despite having comparatively strong central government capacity and the power to move quickly in terms of policy development.

Dr Logan will discuss some of his recent PhD research on the study of how environmental policy did or didn't develop within government to address the significant issues of fragmented oceans management, native biodiversity decline and freshwater quality decline.

The findings offer up valuable lessons for aspiring policy makers, which together with Dr Logan's extensive experience within the public sector makes this lecture an insightful must-attend.

Bio:

Since completing an MA (first class honours) at Canterbury University, Hugh Logan has spent nearly 30 years working in the public sector. His many and varied roles have included running what is now Antarctica NZ (previously the Antarctic Division of DSIR) from 1988 to 1991, Director General of DOC from 1997 to 2006, and CEO of the Ministry for the Environment from 2006 to 2008.

He chose the Department of Environmental Management at Lincoln for his PhD because he wanted to study at an institution that had connections to environmental management and land based issues. His thesis, entitled "Inside the black box: The influence of government executive forces on environmental policy effectiveness in New Zealand", explored the multitude of internal factors that affect environmental management practices in this country.

The intention of this study was to illuminate the effect of these internal forces in order to help the formulation of successful environmental policy and action in the future.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome & no RSVP required, but limited to 65 seats. Email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

A Comparison of Tax Professionals' Perception of Large and Mid-Size Business Tax Law Complexity

Date: 14 March 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Stewart Karlinsky, Professor Emeritus, San Jose State University

Abstract:

Tax Complexity represents one of the most insidious problems facing taxpayers. For example, the US tax law and regulations contains more than 17,000 pages. The effect of this complexity has a significant cost to both taxpayers and the government by creating annual compliance costs. As the tax code becomes more complex, these cost rise as well. In addition, the complexity may distort taxpayer planning and actions. Maybe the most important cost that complexity engenders is the frequent errors by the IRS and taxpayers, and the tangentially related non-compliance (‘tax gap’) with the tax law.

Based on prior research, the impact of tax law complexity should not be overlooked. The current study concentrates on issues related to large and mid-sized businesses. We surveyed both tax directors for large corporations as well as managers and partners of international accounting and law firms to gage their perception of tax law complexity for 40 different issues. The results show that five of the top ten most complex issues involved the international tax arena. Interestingly, issues perceived as very complex in prior studies, such as Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) and depreciation, were not found to be very complex in the context of large companies. This study also tested the differences in perceptions of two groups of participants based on both number of years in practice and whether they worked as outside consultants or within the internal tax department. There were significant differences for some of the tax issues, but for a majority of issues, there were not significant differences.

Bio:

Dr Stewart S. Karlinsky (PhD, MBA, CPA) is Professor Emeritus and was formerly Professor of Taxation and Graduate Tax Director at San Jose State University.

Dr Karlinsky teaches, writes, and speaks in the international tax, corporate, individual, real estate, alternative minimum tax, S corporation, reorganizations, tax policy, and closely held business tax areas. He has lectured extensively to various professional accounting organizations (AICPA, TEI, California CPA), accounting firms (PWC, Deloitte, KPMG, BDO, Ernst & Young, and McGladrey Pullen), and commercial and investment bankers (Bear Stearns, Bank of America, City National Bank, Harris Bank & Bank of Hawaii). He has been an expert witness for both prosecution and defense, and testified before Congress on AMT.

Dr Karlinsky has published over 80 articles in both professional and academic journals, and is the author of The Complete Guide to ALTERNATIVE MINIMUM TAX: 2000-1. He has taught international tax, tax policy and comparative tax systems in United Kingdom, France, Austria, Portugal, Australia, and Ireland, and is a Senior Fellow at Monash University’s Taxation Law and Policy Research Institute.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Science and Public Policy

Date: 7 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Station, Level Five, RWW 501

Speaker: Professor Martin Lodge, London School of Economics & ANZSOG Visiting Scholar

Abstract:

The relationship between science and politics is a contested one. The notion of 'science-based' policy appeals to those favouring the idea of rational policy-making. However, 'science based' policy fails to acknowledge the different roles that 'science' plays when it comes to policy and politics. Furthermore, it also does not acknowledge the conflicts within 'science' itself.

This paper explores this debate by looking at the most extensive and expansive random control trial in the UK, namely the trial involving badgers in the context of concern about the rise of TB in cattle. The paper highlights the highly problematic nature of the notion of a 'science-based' policy.

Bio:

Martin Lodge joined the LSE Government Department in September 2002. Previously he was ESRC Senior Research Officer at the LSE's Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation (CARR) and Lecturer in Public Policy at the University of Ulster at Jordanstown. His undergraduate and PhD degrees are from the LSE.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Towards a Precariat Charter

Date: 26 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

Speaker: Dr Guy Standing, Professor of Development Studies, University of London

Abstract:

Recurrent themes of Professor Standing’s research, often drawing on extensive household and workplace surveys, have been the insecurities faced by workers in the wake of reforms of labour law, labour regulation and social protection, and the rationale for moving towards unconditional income transfers.

Professor Standing is returning to NZ in 2014 to undertake a series of lectures based on his new book, A Precariat Charter: From Denizens to Citizens, to be published in April 2014. This book describes an emerging class characterised by insecurity and lack of any occupational identity, and focuses on 'what can be done'.

His visit in 2013 created a great deal of interest and discussion of the theses presented in his 2011 book, The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class.

Bio:

Guy Standing is Professor of Development Studies at SOAS, University of London, and a founder and co-President of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN), an NGO promoting basic income as a right.

He has held chairs at the Universities of Bath and Monash (Australia) and was previously Director of the Socio-Economic Security Programme of the International Labour Organisation. He is currently working on pilot basic income schemes in India. A full resume is available here »

Hosted by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (previously the Industrial Relations Centre) as part of their 2013 Lunchtime Seminar.

Tea and coffee will be available and you are welcome to bring your lunch; there is no charge for the seminar and no RSVP is required.

Preparing for 2015: An Update for Charities

Date: 26 February 2014

Time: 8.15 am

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Building on the successful Not-for-Profit Sector Conference in 2012, this occasional Not-for-Profit Seminar Series addresses current issues of relevance to the sector.

Background:

The Financial Reporting Act has recently passed, bringing a new regulatory framework, new reporting responsibilities and opportunities.

The Accounting Infrastructure Reform Bill also proposes that registered charities with annual operating expenditure of $500,000 or more be required to have the financial statements they file with their annual returns assured by a qualified accountant.

The Department of Internal Affairs is to be tasked with monitoring compliance with these requirements.

This seminar will cover:

  • What changes have occurred in the regulation of charities and what reporting and assurance responsibilities will it bring?
  • What specific steps can you undertake now to prepare for the changes to your financial statements for 2015?
  • Revenue generation strategies – highlights and pitfalls identified from charities’ financial statements.
  • A look across the Tasman – what can we learn?

Programme and registration details (cost $60 excl GST) are available from the NFP Seminar Series pages.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Beth Goodwin, Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment
  • Brendon Ward, General Manager, Charities, Department of Internal Affairs
  • Carolyn Cordery, Member, NZ Accounting Standards Board and Senior Lecturer, School of Accounting and Commercial Law
  • Kevin Simpkins, Chair External Reporting Board, and Adjunct Professor, School of Accounting and Commercial Law
  • Stewart Donaldson, Australian Charities and Not-for-Profit Commission (ex-NZ Charities Commission and IRD

Hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research.

 

Strategic Expectations: Fictitious Play in a Model of Rationally Heterogeneous Expectations

Date: 25 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Christopher Gibbs, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales

Background:

Christopher Gibbs is currently a Lecturer at University of New South Wales (Australian School of Business), School of Economics. His field of expertise is in Macroeconomics, learning and expectations and time series econometrics.

Christopher is currently working on the following papers:

  1. The Real Forecasting Advantage of the UC-SV Model of U.S. Ination (2013)
  2. Forecast Combination in the Macroeconomy (2012)
  3. Strategic Expectations: Fictitious Play in a Model of Rationally Heterogeneous Expectations (2012)
  4. Systematic Ination Forecast Errors, Forecast Combination, and the Forecast Combination Puzzle (2012)

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

From Sustainable, Green and Inclusive Growth to Disaster Economics

Date: 21 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11 Meeting Room RH 1113

Speakers: Professor James Roumasset and Dr Kimberly Burnett, Dept of Economics, University of Hawai’i

Abstract:

While the popular version of sustainable development is non-operational at best, sustainable growth in economics rests on three pillars:

  • interlinkages between the economy and the environment
  • intergenerational equity
  • dynamic optimization

We extend this conceptual framework to green and inclusive growth. In order to engage the concerns of disaster management, the same framework must incorporate uncertainty. After reviewing some results from dynamic optimization under uncertainty, we apply catastrophe theory to the problem of invasive species management.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Hermeneutic Tensions in Critical Thinking: The Play of Affirmation and Doubt

Date: 21 February 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 315

Speaker: Professor Ed Arrington, University of Wollongong

Abstract:

Critical accounting research seeks to interpret and explain accounting in a range of ways, all of which embed doubts about accounting and its practices and all of which seek to warrant that doubting through affirmation of some theory (e.g.,Marxist thought); some moral stance (eg, distributive justice), or some episteme or intellectual and discursive style (e.g., constructivism, genealogy, deconstruction). The doubts in critical research run much deeper than the functionalistic doubts of "mainstream" accounting, a body of research which affirms accounting’s service to capital and thus enjoys an interpretive simplicity focussed on how well or poorly accounting carries out its conventional functions (e.g., control of labour; decision usefulness of financial statements). Also, the affirmation of accounting within the mainstream is simply assumed – accounting is viewed as, teleologically and normatively, a practice that should be in the service of particular concepts of the good (e.g., the good of efficiency, of profitability, etc.).

In critical research, affirmation is much more difficult to assume, particularly given the fact that in our post- or late-modern intellectual space we cannot simply "ground" intellectual discourse in a singular theory or singular conception of the good of economy, of society, of morality, or of the "self"). This essay seeks to explore ways in which critical researchers might better interpret and understand the intellectual and practical force of their work as engaged with a "critical hermeneutic" practice of research and scholarship.

Bio:

Professor Ed Arrington came to the School of Accounting and Finance from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. He is a well-known international scholar in critical accounting and moral philosophy, and currently serves on the editorial boards of several top ranked journals in his field including International Journal of Critical Accounting, Society and Business Review, Critical Perspectives on Accounting, and Accounting Forum.

Ed’s interests are in critical social theory and its relation to accounting and organisations, as well as theories of language in the context of commerce and culture.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Local e-Government Practices in Scandinavia: Challenging Local Autonomy and Regional Characteristics

Date: 19 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Speaker: Professor Elin Wihlborg, Department of Management, Linköping University, Sweden

Background:

Professor Elin Wihlborg holds a PhD in Technology and Social Change and a Master’s degree in Social Policy from London School of Economics. Since 2012 she has been a Professor in Politics at the department of Management, Linköping University and a Marie Curie scholar (2011-14) for research on sustainable e-government.

Professor Wihlborg's own research focuses on e-government, sustainable development and public administration. Her recent publications cover issues like municipal contact centres, local crises management, co-production of local public services and policy entrepreneurs.

Hosted by the Chair in e-Government. All welcome; no registration required.

The Impact of Stronger Property Rights in Pharmaceuticals on Innovation in Developed and Developing Countries

Date: 17 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, RHMZ05

Speaker: Professor Sumner La Croix, Department of Economics, University of Hawaii-Manoa

Abstract:

We use dynamic panel data regressions to determine the relation between the strength of a countrys patent protection for pharmaceutical innovations and pharmaceutical patents granted to its residents and corporations by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Patent strength is measured by the Pharmaceutical Intellectual Property Protection (PIPP) Index.

Using panel data from 25 developing and 41 developed countries over the 1970-2004 period, results from dynamic probit and poisson regressions find that stronger patent protection for pharmaceutical innovations has little effect on patent activity in the developing country sample and number of patents granted in the developed country sample.

Bio:

Sumner La Croix is Professor in the Department of Economics Program at the University of Hawai′i-Manoa; and an affiliate faculty member with the UH-Manoa Center for Chinese Studies and the UH-Manoa Center for Japanese Studies. La Croix’s research focuses on the economic history, development, and current state of economies in the Asia-Pacific region, with an emphasis on issues pertaining to institutional change, property rights, intellectual property rights, and organization and regulation of industry. Current research projects include articles on patents and access to essential medicines; China’s rise as an international trading power; racial discrimination in Japanese and American baseball; property rights in land in Dutch South Africa; Chinese out-bound tourism and ADS; and economic education in Hawaii.

La Croix is also revising a book manuscript on the economic history of Hawaii; and is coordinating the Hawaii Census Project, a multi-year venture to publish a database with all records from the 1900-1930 territorial censuses of Hawaii and to use the database to analyze the assimilation of immigrants to Hawaii.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Evidence for Agile Policy Makers

Date: 14 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Speaker: Dr Graham Room, Professor of European Social Policy, University of Bath

Abstract:

Advocates of evidence-based policy-making (EBPM) are typically concerned with the impact of particular interventions. This implicit ontology of the policy world, as disaggregated into a variety of independent interventions, has been challanged by Pawson (2006) in terms of the contingencies that activate, inhibit or reshape the impact of any intervention.

This critique does not however go far enough. The potentialities and impact of an intervention are contingent on the synergies that it develops with other interventions. This provides a vantage point for re-considering the theory and practice of EBPM and systematic review.

Bio:

Dr Graham Room is Professor of European Social Policy at the University of Bath. His latest research is concerned with complexity theory and social dynamics and with the implications for policy analysis

Professor Room is author, co-author or editor of twelve books, the most recent being Complexity, Institutions and Public Policy: Agile Decision-Making in a Turbulent World. He is also Acting Director of the Institute for Policy Research, the Founding Editor of the Journal of European Social Policy, and is a member of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Corporate Governance in Islamic Countries

Date: 12 February 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 315

Speaker: Professor Christine Helliar, University of South Australia Business School

Abstract:

Corporate Governance from a Western perspective is usually about the principal/agent relationship and aligning the incentives of managers with those of shareholders. However in many Islamic countries there are under developed capital markets and most businesses are either family owned or government owned, either directly by the state or through government investment arms. Thus the institutional context of firms in Islamic countries is very different from that of the west and, as such, the governance of these firms should relate to their political, social, historical and legal context.

One feature of an Islamic country is Shariah law, and the Muslim faith that embodies social justice, and how humans are merely trustees for Allah (PBUH) and act as his vice regents on Earth. However, the Islamic concepts of truth, justice and fairness do not seem to operate in business, and thus the governance of firms in practice has decoupled from the practice and embodiment of the Muslim faith.

Bio:

Professor Christine Helliar is the Head of the School of Commerce at the University of South Australia. She previously worked Ernst & Young in London and investment banking in the City at Morgan Stanley, Hong Kong Bank and Citigroup, and has a wide background in accounting, finance and capital markets.

As Director of Research at The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland for six years from 2003-2009, she undertook business relevant research and engagement and I am currently chair of the British Accounting and Finance Association.

Professor Christine Helliar's research includes financial reporting, corporate governance, accounting education, risk, risk management and derivatives, auditing and management control.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

America's Economic and Political Challenges

Date: 3 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Dr Steven Kelman, Professor of Public Management, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Abstract:

Professor Kelman's lecture will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the US economy and why the US political system has difficulties solving the country's budget and long term fiscal problems.

Bio:

Dr. Steven Kelman is the Weatherhead Professor of Public Management at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard College, with a PhD in government from Harvard University, he is the author of many books and articles on the policymaking process and on improving the management of government organizations.

His latest book, Unleashing Change: A Study of Organizational Change in Government, was published in 2005 by the Brookings Instutition Press. His other books include a study on how to improve the government computer procurement process, entitled Procurement and Public Management: The Fear of Discretion and the Quality of Government Performance (AEI Press, 1990), and Making Public Policy: A Hopeful View of American Government (Basic Books, 1987).

In 1996 he was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. In 2001, he received the Herbert Roback Memorial Award, the highest achievement award of the National Contract Management Association. In 2003 he was elected as a Director of The Procurement Roundtable. In 2010 the American Political Science Association awarded him the Gaus Prize, which honors a lifetime of achievement in public administration scholarship. He currently serves as editor of the International Public Management Journal.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Reducing Inequality through Universal Basic Income

Date: 31 January 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

Speaker: Perce Hapham

Background:

Universal Basic Income (UBI) is an idea whose time may have come. Although the idea of a UBI was first mooted around 1800, the financing of it appears always to have been considered separately. In this IGPS seminar, Perce Harpham will discuss the beginning of a solution by considering both a Universal Basic Income and an Asset Tax to finance it.

By choice of appropriate levels of the variables, Perce will argue that both tax and benefit systems can be simplified and inequality reduced. He will draw on recent examples of innovation in this field; most notably the forthcoming vote in Switzerland, and the advocacy campaign by a Conservative Canadian Senator.

Bio:

Born in Tauranga, Perce graduated as a Chemical Engineer from Canterbury University and worked for Dulux paints for 14 years - being seconded to ICI in England in 1957 and then to the head office in Australia before returning to NZ and progressing through Production Manager to being in charge of setting up and managing Dulux’s computer, the fourth in NZ.

When Britain joined the Common Market he set up the first software company in NZ. It prospered, for 21 years with offices throughout NZ and Australia as well as Chicago, Los Angeles and Beijing. He stood for the Green Party in Hutt South in 2002 but has since joined the Labour Party.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

The Rhetoric of Economics after 30 Years

Date: 20 December 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Deirdre McCloskey, Professor of Economics, History, English and Communication at the University of Illinois, Chicago

Abstract:

In the early 1980's Deirdre McCloskey, a Harvard-trained, Chicago-employed economic historian, brought the methods of the humanities to bear on her own field of economics.

In a famous article and subsequent books on the rhetoric of economics she showed that economics, like any science, was rhetorical, in the sense that it was, necessarily, argued. Metaphors as models and narratives as motivation play an equal part with logic and statistics in science. Science is human persuasion.

Nowadays she has arrived at a further ambition to bring humanistic methods into the heart of economic science itself, "humanomics".

Bio:

Deirdre N. McCloskey is a Distinguished Professor of Economics, History, English, and Communication at the University of Illinois, Chicago (UIC), and is well known for her work in Economic History and Methodology.

She is also adjunct professor of Philosophy and Classics at UIC, and for five years was a visiting Professor of Philosophy at Erasmus University, Rotterdam. Since October 2007 she has received six honorary doctorates.

In 2013, she received the Julian L. Simon Memorial Award from the Competitive Enterprise Institute for her work examining factors in history that led to advancement in human achievement and prosperity.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance / Business, Economics and Accounting History Network (BEAN). RSVP to Ingrid.watts@vuw.ac.nz or telephone 04-463 5380.

Tests of Statistical Significance are Highly Misleading

Date: 18 December 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, RHMZ05

Speaker: Professor Deirdre McCloskey, Professor of Economics, History, English and Communication at the University of Illinois, Chicago

Abstract:

Economics and medicine and a few other fields have come to be dominated by "statistical significance" -- a machine replacing scientific judgment with calculation. Deirdre McCloskey is internationally renowned for her long, one-woman struggle against the misnamed "significance." She argues that the technique needs to be banned from serious science.

Bio:

Deirdre N. McCloskey is a Distinguished Professor of Economics, History, English, and Communication at the University of Illinois, Chicago (UIC), and is well known for her work in Economic History and Methodology.

She is also adjunct professor of Philosophy and Classics at UIC, and for five years was a visiting Professor of Philosophy at Erasmus University, Rotterdam. Since October 2007 she has received six honorary doctorates.

In 2013, she received the Julian L. Simon Memorial Award from the Competitive Enterprise Institute for her work examining factors in history that led to advancement in human achievement and prosperity.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. RSVP to Ingrid.watts@vuw.ac.nz or telephone 04-463 5380.

Ethics & Standards in English Local Government

Date: 17 December 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Floor, MZ04

Speaker: Dr Gary Hickey, former Head of Research, Standards for England

Abstract:

The Localism Act 2011 has radically altered the integrity and standards framework of English local government. Dr Gary Hickey will be discussing these developments from the perspective of an insider who witnessed first-hand the rise and fall of that regime. Gary was the Head of Research for Standards for England, the strategic regulator established by Tony Blair in 2001 following a wake of high profile fraud and corruption scandals, which has now been abolished under the terms of the Localism Act. The integrity framework was, arguably, a very forward looking regime: it was not solely concerned with regulation and compliance, but offered channels for direct engagement with citizens and ordinary members of the public. In this sense, the Localism Act has, arguably, reduced levels of localism.

Gary has over a decade's experience of working in the field of ethics and corruption. This work includes the regulator of ethical standards in local government in England, undertaking an integrity study of the UK for Transparency International, and working as a consultant for the Council of Europe on a project to promote ethics in the public sector in Turkey.

Bio:

Dr Gary Hickey, a former Head of Research at Standards for England, is currently establishing the Centre for Public Engagement. A joint venture between Kingston University and St Goerge's University of London, the Centre aims to become a hub of expertise in service user involvement within education, research, health and social care, and service development.

Dr Hickey has a degree in Public Administration and a PhD in Health Studies, and his expertise is in ensuring that research translates into policy and action.

He has over a decade of experience working in health and social care research, including service user involvement, within a university setting, and over a decade's experience working in research and project management within public sector organisations, both in the UK and overseas, on ethics and corruption.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

The Mother of All Sudden Stops: Capital Flows and Reversals in Europe, 1919-32

Date: 6 December 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Barry Eichengreen, University of California

Abstract:

We present new data documenting European capital issues in major financial centers from 1919 to 1932. Push factors (conditions in international capital markets) perform better than pull factors (conditions in the borrowing countries) in explaining the surge and reversal in capital flows. In particular, the sharp increase in stock market volatility in the major financial centers at the end of the 1920s figured importantly in the decline in foreign lending. We draw parallels with Europe today.

Bio:

Barry Eichengreen is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1987. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts) and Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy (London, England).

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Earnings Quality and Performance in the Banking Industry: A Profit Frontier Approach

Date: 6 December 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Emili Tortosa-Ausina, Department of Economics at the Jaume I University, Spain

Abstract:

The analysis of efficiency and productivity in banking has received a great deal of attention for almost three decades now. However, most of the existing literature to date has not explicitly accounted for risk when measuring efficiency. We propose an analysis of profit efficiency taking into account how the inclusion of a variety of bank risk measures might bias efficiency scores. Our measures of risk are partly inspired by the literature on earnings management and earnings quality taking into account that loan loss provisions, as a generally accepted proxy for risk, can be adjusted to manage earnings and regulatory capital. We also consider some variants of traditional models of profit efficiency where different regimes are stipulated so that financial institutions can be evaluated in different dimensions; i.e. prices, quantities, or prices and quantities simultaneously.

We perform this analysis on the Spanish banking industry, whose institutions are deeply affected by the current international financial crisis, and where re-regulation is taking place. Our results can be explored in multiple dimensions but, in general, they indicate that the impact of earnings management on profit efficiency is of less magnitude than what might be a priori expected, and that the performance of savings banks has been generally worse than that of commercial banks. However, the former firms are adapting to the new regulatory scenario and catching up with commercial banks rapidly, especially in some dimensions of performance.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be followed by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Using an Intelligent Decision Support System (DSS) Based on Fuzzy Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) Techniques for Selecting Suppliers of Information Resources in the Libraries and Information Centers

Date: 3 December 2013

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: Old Government Building, GBG 04

Speaker: Dr Asefeh Asemi, University of Isfahan, Iran

Abstract:

The main aim of the study was to determine the possible attach a DSS as a sub-system to RASA and Voyager, based on fuzzy MCDM techniques for selecting suppliers of information resources. It is notable that RASA and Voyager are library management systems. The host libraries in this study were the National Library of Iran for RASA and VUW for Voyager. The fuzzy analytic method used as a research method. The population of the study included the system developers, subject librarians, managers, and decision makers in acquisition section in these libraries. Data collection tools included a review of literature, government documents and reports, questionnaires, evaluation forms, and interview. For analyzing data used AHP and TOPSIS techniques and Inferential and descriptive statistics. Mind mapper, Excel, Expert Choice, TOPSIS, and other software employed in this research.

The results of the study show that which criteria are the best criteria for selecting of information resources and which criteria is the best criteria for selecting suppliers. The study produced a ranking of suppliers for each library. Also it is shown that RASA and Voyager can use of the recommended DSS as a sub-system to the main system.

Bio:

Dr Asefeh Asemi is visiting the School of Information Management from the University of Isfahan, where she is the Head of the Department of Knowledge and Information Science.

Dr Asemi completed her PhD at the University of Pune, India, in 2006, researching the impact of IT on medical libraries in Iran. She is a member of Emerald Group Publishing (2006-2013) on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Electronic Library journal. She set up the first online course in library and information science to be offered in Iran.

Her research interests centre on users and their interaction with information retrieval systems, new knowledge and information organisation environments such as digital libraries, e-learning, web2. 0 tools, subject gateways and portals.

Hosted by the School of Information Management

Institutional Environment, Ownership, and Disclosure of Intangibles: Evidence from East Asia

Date: 29 November 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 219

Speaker: Professor David Emanuel, University of Auckland

Abstract:

This seminar is based on a paper that examines the value relevance of voluntary disclosures about intangibles in eight East Asian countries and the effect of variation in company-level and country-level governance on the valuation of these disclosures. Using Easton and Sommers’ (2003) deflated valuation approach in analyses involving 459 companies, we find that the voluntary disclosures are value relevant, over and above the numbers in the balance sheet and income statement. We also find that the value relevance of these disclosures is conditional on the level of director ownership and the strength of the institutional features of a country.

Bio:

David Emanuel's interests are in financial accounting and finance, particularly those issues associated with the impact of classes of accounting information on capital assets, primarily the prices of shares. He is also interested in the reform of government trading enterprises. He has acted as a consultant to accounting and legal firms, and to a number of government departments.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law.

Community and Voluntary Sector Research Forum

Date: 25 November 2013

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 501

Speakers:
  • Philip Walker (Statistics New Zealand): "Social well-being in New Zealand – Insights from the General Social Survey 2012"
  • Val Goold (Head of Student Ministries, Tertiary Students Christian Fellowship): "What’s in my kete? Women in Leadership"
  • Rachel Baskerville and Carolyn Cordery (Victoria University): "Voices from the Clubroom"

A number of academics at Victoria University research in, and for, the community and voluntary sector, with many of our postgraduate students also researching in this area.

As well as networking within the University, this research is shared with the community through regular Community and Voluntary Sector Research (CVSR) Forums

The forums run from 3.00-5.00pm, with tea and coffee available from 2.45pm. They are held in Railway West Wing 501 (use the Victoria University door on the left hand side of the Station, then take the first lift to the 5th floor or one of the other lifts to the 4th floor and walk up a flight of stairs). General public are most welcome to attend these regular seminars.

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CVSR Forum Flyer (November 2013) 540 KB PDF

Appetite for Destruction: Food - the Good, the Bad and the Fatal

Date: 22 November 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 5, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Gareth Morgan, economist, public policy analyst, portfolio investor, motorcycle adventurer and philanthropist.

Abstract:

We Kiwis are literally eating ourselves to death. In the move from cooking to convenience food we have given up control of what we eat. As a result our food is heavy on sugar, fat and salt, and the light on the nutrients our body needs. This is causing a hidden health crisis that will swamp our hospitals just when the baby boomers want their hip operations.

Bio:

Dr Morgan is an economist, public policy analyst, portfolio investor, motorcycle adventurer and philanthropist. Through the Morgan Foundation Gareth has instigated a series of books on issues of public interest. He has also co-authored with his wife Joanne, 5 books on their offshore motorcycle trips, and has written three books on personal investment. See 'Other Titles' for more information. His latest project "Our Far South" set out to raise New Zealanders' awareness of the importance of the area between Stewart Island and the South Pole – the race for resources, the sensitivity of Antarctica to climate change and the threat to biodiversity or our subantarctic islands from overfishing, marine pollution and climate change. This project led on to Gareth's participation in further conservation projects – Predator Free New Zealand, Million Dollar Mouse, Stewart Island Treasure, and New Zealand's Cleanest River.

Gareth is a shareholder in Welnix, which owns the Wellington Phoenix Football team and part of the Hurricanes rugby franchise. Gareth's directorships have included a national legal firm, publicly listed companies, advisory boards of government departments, New Zealand's largest website auction house TradeMe Ltd, and Leite Verde SA a Brazilian dairy industry business. Gareth graduated from Victoria University with a PhD in economics 1982.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Cultural Integration: Experimental Evidence of Convergence of Immigrants' Preferences

Date: 22 November 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 315

Speaker: Professor Lisa Cameron, Director of the Monash Centre for Development Economics, Monash University

Abstract:

Cultural traits play a significant role in the determination of economic outcomes and institutions. This paper presents evidence from laboratory experiments on the cultural integration of individuals of Chinese ethnicity in Australia, focusing on social preferences, preferences for competition, and risk attitudes. We show that the greater the share of education an individual receives in the West, the more they behave like Western subjects and the less they behave according to the norms of their Eastern heritage. Increased exposure to Western culture has a strong negative impact on altruism and trust and trustworthiness.

For trust, we find evidence that cultural integration influences an individual’s group identity with those who have increased exposure to Western culture trusting more in mixed ethnicity sessions. For risk and competitive preferences, our results are gender-specific. These results have important implications for policy making and institution building in multi-cultural societies.

Bio:

Lisa Cameron is the Director of the Monash Centre for Development Economics (CDE). She is an empirical development economist, focusing predominantly on Indonesia and China. Her research often incorporates the techniques of experimental economics. Professor Cameron is interested in program evaluation and was a principal investigator of a World Bank/Gates Foundation randomised evaluation of an Indonesian sanitation program implemented at scale across rural East Java.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Seminar cancelled - Drying Out: Investigating the Economic Effects of Drought in New Zealand

Date: 20 November 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, Room MZ05

Speaker: Dr Gunes Kamber, Reserve Bank of New Zealand

Abstract:

In early 2013 New Zealand suffered its worst drought in decades. A drought zone was declared over the entire North Island and parts of the South Island. Measures of soil moisture deficit were at their highest levels since the 1970s. We estimate the impact of this drought using a macroeconomic model, based on past relationships. We use the model to outline the transmission channels through which the drought is likely to affect the economy.

Bio:

Dr Gunes Kamber joined the Bank in 2009 and holds a PhD in economics from the Paris School of Economics. He was an intern at the OECD in 2004, at the International Monetary Fund in 2007, and at the Bank of England in 2008. His current research interests include:

  • Monetary policy and DSGE models
  • Labour market frictions
  • Transmission of international shocks

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Income Tax Exempt Charitable Structure as a Vehicle for Holding Australian Native Title Interests: Some Lessons from New Zealand

Date: 15 November 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Fiona Martin, University of New South Wales

Abstract:

The common law narrative of the legal concept of charity requires that a charity have a public benefit. This has been interpreted to exclude charities that benefit family members (other than those solely for the relief of poverty). Indigenous Australians holding traditional lands commonly wish to use a charitable structure to receive mining payments and promote community development. However the common law public benefit requirement poses a legal barrier to the establishment of charities for the benefit of Native Title Groups and other Traditional Owners who are defined in accordance with their traditional cultures and practices as this often involves family relationships. New Zealand followed the common law on this issue until it reviewed the taxation of Maori organisations in 2001 and subsequently amended the law relating to charities.

This talk discusses the historical development of the application of charity law in New Zealand and the judicial criticism of the strict ‘public benefit’ test. It considers the two government reviews that took place in New Zealand that culminated in the amendment of the law to provide that the public benefit test can still be satisfied where there is a blood connection between the beneficiaries of a charity. It looks at how this broader test has been applied in New Zealand and also how a similar development has occurred in Australia.

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Dr Fiona Martin: Seminar presentation    227 KB PDF

Bio:

Dr Fiona Martin researches media convergence and the development, uses and regulation of online media (internet, web, mobiles, e-readers and IPTV), with a particular interest in public service media. Currently she is studying concepts of self, risk and value in PSM user interaction and participatory environments. She is conducting research on the ethical and legal implications of convergent and online news publishing for the Australian Press Council. She is also a chief investigator, with Gerard Goggin and Tim Dwyer, on the ARC Discovery project Moving Media (2012-2014), researching mobile internet development, uses and policy.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Complexity and Managing the Unexpected

Date: 14 November 2013

Time: 11.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House. Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Robert Flynn, a Melbourne-based consultant working in the arena of Organisational Complexity Analysis

Abstract:

Buried within the operations of every large enterprise are the seeds of its own destruction. This applies to private and government sector organisations alike. These are typically opaque, obscure forces, not at all visible to normal managerial scrutiny. 'Normal' here means a perspective that is largely grounded in a linear, Newtonian view of the world, which is unlikely to prove helpful when it comes to the challenge of attempting to ‘manage the unexpected’. This is especially the case in a 21st century business environment characterised by increasing levels of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity – the so-called ‘VUCA’ syndrome.

This presentation argues that we need to educate our leaders in the art and practice of Organisational Complexity Analysis (OCA for short) in order to better prepare them for this challenge. By drawing on the so-called ‘complexity sciences’, but also on certain intellectual disciplines not traditionally taught in our business schools, OCA provides a systematic method for unearthing the insidious forces that give rise to the complex problems situations that, in turn, tend to produce unintended and unexpected outcomes. More specifically, it will describe one intervention model that has proven enormously helpful in managing the unexpected in the cut and thrust of both large-scale industry and government.

Bio:

Robert Flynn is a Melbourne-based consultant working in the arena of Organisational Complexity Analysis. While independent, he is part of an international network of individuals and firms with a particular focus on this increasingly relevant management discipline. For the past twelve years he has concentrated most of his research and consulting efforts in the OCA arena, working primarily in the oil & gas, mining & minerals, construction and government sectors. He received his BBS (Hons) and MA degrees from Trinity College Dublin, and a PhD in philosophy from the University of Tasmania.

Hosted by the School of Management. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Labour's Vision for the Future

Date: 13 November 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, GBLT1

Speaker: Hon David Cunliffe, Leader of the Labour Party

Background:

In his recent address to the Labour Party Conference, Hon David Cunliffe said:

Our mission is to Build a Future for All, including an economy that works for everyone, a fair and just society, an environment we protect, and a nation we can be proud of. Our Party, alongside all New Zealanders, can deliver this vision together.

In this presentation David Cunliffe will outline Labour's vision for the future of New Zealand.

Bio:

David Cunliffe studied politics at the University of Otago, where he was a member of the Otago University Debating Society, and gained a Bachelor of Arts with first-class honours. He held a Fulbright Scholarship at Harvard University’s John F Kennedy School of Government in 1994-1995, earning a Master of Public Administration, then worked as a management consultant with the Boston Consulting Group in Auckland from 1995 to 1999 before he ran for Labour in the seat of Titirangi.

In 2003 David was appointed to Cabinet as Minister of State and Associate Minister of Finance; Revenue; and Communications and Information Technology. In 2004, he became Minister for Communications and Information Technology. He went on to become Minister of Immigration and later Minister of Health.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Name and Shame – Director Attendance Disclosure and Practice

Date: 8 November 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Ellie Chapple, Queensland University of Technology

Abstract:

This study investigates the attendance practices of corporate directors in listed companies in Australia, which has a full meeting attendance disclosure regime, relative to corporate directors in the U.S., which has a ‘brightline’ disclosure of attendance below 75 percent. New characteristics of directors with poor attendance records are also identified. Our analysis indicates that Australian directors have poorer attendance records relative to their U.S. counterparts. On average, they are three times more likely to attend fewer than 75% of meetings and twice as likely to exhibit repeat poor attendance. Absentee non-executive directors in Australia are more likely to be non-independent, have no other directorships, lower compensation, shorter tenure, no committee assignments and are less likely to have formal qualifications as a medical doctor, accountant or lawyer.

This study highlights the significant differences in the attendance disclosure regimes and the attendance practices of corporate directors in Australia and the United States. The results of our analysis have implications for the reporting framework of director attendance in Australia and other markets around the world that disclose director attendance records in annual reports, and extend our knowledge of the characteristics of both non-executive and executive directors with poor attendance at board and committee meetings.

Bio:

Professor Chapple’s teaching and research interests are primarily corporate law, corporate governance and capital market transactions. She has published the results of her research, including corporate disclosure issues in fundraising and takeovers and corporate governance, in journals such as Accounting and Finance, Company and Securities Law Journal, Australian Business Law Review, Australian Journal of Management and Australian Journal of Corporate Law. Ellie also maintains an interest in Insolvency Law and Trade Practices Law.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be followed by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

‘Slave Free Seas’: Ethics and Social Action

Date: 6 November 2013

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speakers: A/Prof Deborah Jones (School of Management) & Ben Butler-Hogg (2013 Summer Research Scholar)

Abstract:

New Zealand fishing companies chartering foreign fishing vessels have been implicated in human rights abuses of their crews. The vessels are now typically owned by Korean companies with Korean officers, while crew are mostly Indonesian. The abuses included physical and sexual violence, with-holding of pay and very low pay, extreme working hours and dangerous working conditions. International campaigners against these practices framed the consumption of New Zealand seafood products as ‘slavery on a plate’. There was active global campaigning by international maritime unions and NGOs such as the global anti-slavery organisation, The Mekong Club,linked to campaigns by local unions and the local NGO ‘Slave Free Seas’.

Intensifying debates over this issue culminated in a 2012 government decision that all workers on New Zealand-chartered vessels would come under the protection of New Zealand employment law from 2016. This presentation analyse the various arguments made by the local and global actors in this case, including geopolitical and economic as well as ethical concerns. Drawing on Hargrave’s (2009) synthesis of the concept of the ‘moral imagination’ and of a collective action model of social change, we explore how a provisional (and still contested) political consensus was achieved. In particular we consider how the rhetoric of ‘slavery’ was used to intensify the ethical imagination of key communities of interest.

Bio:

Deborah Jones is an Associate Professor in the School of Management at Victoria Business School. She teaches a course on Organisations and Ethics, and this seminar is based on material developed for it. Her current research interests include working lives and policy in the film industry, and sexual identity and orientation in the workplace.

Ben Butler-Hogg completed his BCA in 2012. He worked on the ‘Slave-Free Seas’ case on a Summer Research Scholarship in 2012-2013. He is now working at Ernst & Young, Wellington.

Hosted by the School of Management. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Being Productive at the Productivity Commission

Date: 29 October 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Sally Davenport, School of Management and Productivity Commission

Abstract:

Professor Sally Davenport has been on secondment as a commissioner at the NZ Productivity Commission for 2.5 years. Modelled on the Australian Productivity Commission (but about 1/10 its size), in its short history the Commission has begun to make a valuable contribution to the policy scene in New Zealand. The Commission is effectively a research think-tank, staffed largely by top-notch economists and policy specialists. It is an independent entity that is 'told what to investigate' (through terms of reference decided by the Minister of Finance) but not 'told what to say'. The inquiry topics are generally complex, some would say 'wicked', problems and the inquiry teams try to rally together new or unknown evidence upon which to base their commentary and recommendations.

Having commenced with Housing Affordability in April 2011, the Commission undertakes 2 topics a year so is now on its 5th and 6th inquiries, into the Services Sector and Improving Design and Operation of Regulatory Regimes, respectively. The Commission also has a research function and a role in promoting public understanding of productivity issues. In this informal (non-research) seminar, Sally will outline the work and approach of the Productivity Commission and her experiences as an academic stepping out into 'the real world' of Wellington.

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Sally Davenport-Seminar Presentation  475 KB PDF

Bio:

Professor Davenport into the business world while working as a consultant in Britain in the late 1980s. She returned to New Zealand to take up a position teaching the management of science & technology but, being in Wellington, has also developed interests in research policy. She has worked as a consultant for organisations such as the Foundation for Research, Science & Technology (FRST) and the Ministry of Research, Science & Technology. She also has a long-standing research relationship with Industrial Research, one of the Government's Crown Research Institutes.

Sally has been an investigator on three major FRST grants investigating competitive advantage in New Zealand’s high-tech firms, and networks and relationships in New Zealand’s biotechnology sector. Until recently she was the leader of a FRST-funded project entitled “Building Our Productivity – Understanding Sustainable Collective Productivity in New Zealand Firms”. On the basis of this research, Sally was appointed as a Commissioner with the New Zealand Productivity Commission in 2011.

Hosted by the School of Management. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Accounting for Expenditure on Intangibles

Date: 24 October 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Beth Webster, University of Melbourne

Abstract:

In search of a unifying measurement feature on which to base a more systematic and potentially comprehensive analysis of intangibles, this paper first analyses the economic and accounting properties of intangibles, and second, empirically evaluates managerial practices for measuring and analysing expenditure on intangibles. We present evidence from a survey of 614 large Australian firms that suggests widespread gaps in the extent with which firms plan, monitor, record, analyse, and report on intangibles. Third, we evaluate the implications of our analysis and survey for accounting practice.

Our evidence suggests GAAP has a role to provide guidance that helps firms identify and classify their expenditure on intangibles, in ways that elucidate the strategic implications of the different types of intangibles for future output. A secondary step for accountants, after identifying and classifying the expenditure on intangibles, is to apply a capitalisation test to distinguish expenses from assets. The current asymmetric treatment of expenditure on purchased versus internally generated intangibles is not supportable on economic grounds.

Bio:

Professor Webster is the Director of the Intellectual Property Research Institute of Australia (IPRIA) and Professorial Fellow, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economics and Social Research at University of Melbourne, She has a PhD (economics) from the University of Cambridge and economics degrees from Monash University. Her research on the economics of innovation, intellectual property, as well as more general research on the performance of Australian enterprises is published regularly in both local and international academic journals. Beth sits on a number of government committees; makes regular presentations to industry and government audiences, both locally and overseas; and contributes to evidence-based policy debates in the media.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Business Resilience in Canterbury: Myths, Realities and Learnings Post-earthquakes

Date: 24 October 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, Room 5

Speaker: Dr Erica Seville, Risk Strategies Research and Consulting / University of Canterbury

Abstract:

Resilient Organisations has been researching the resilience of organisations in New Zealand for the past 10 years. Immediately following the 4th September 2010 earthquake in Canterbury the team initiated a suite of research projects to track the recovery trajectories of organisations across the Canterbury economy, providing a rich picture of what has helped and what has hindered their recovery. In this presentation we reflect on key learnings that have emerged from this research that are relevant for business owners and policy makers alike.

This presentation will make you reconsider some of the myths that abound about business recovery from disaster and will prompt you to think about how resilient your own organisation might be in the face of crisis.

Bio:

Dr Erica Seville is an Adjunct Senior Fellow with the Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury, and also director of Risk Strategies Research and Consulting. She has a Bachelor of Engineering Honours degree and a PhD in risk assessment.

After completing her PhD, Erica spent four years in the UK where she worked as a risk management consultant, providing advice for leading public and private sector clients, including London Underground Ltd, Railtrack, the UK Ministry of Defence, National Audit Office, Defence Procurement Agency, and Shell Gas Trading. Erica also worked with JP Morgan Chase in London managing operational risks during the trade settlement process.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Tourism Research in Vietnam: Inter-Destination Marketing/Tourism and Migration

Date: 23 October 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speakers: Lan Nguyen & My Tran present preliminary results of their Master's thesis topics

Background:

Lan Nguyen and My Tran are currently studying towards their Master’s degree in tourism management and will be presenting some preliminary results of their respective thesis topics.

The South Central Coast (SCC) is one of the seven tourism zones in Vietnam. The region has great potential for tourism development, especially for marine and cultural tourism. However, the region’s tourism development is evaluated to not yet match its potential. One reason contributes to this limitation is the lack of effective destination marketing done by SCC provinces which share many similarities in tourism resources.

Lan’s research explores the destination marketing context of local destinations in a regional context and investigates the destination marketing relationships between provinces in a region through joint marketing activities.

My’s Master’s thesis is primarily concerned with tourism and migration. Using a case study approach, her focus is on travelling professional workers in Da Nang, the biggest city on the South Central Coast of Vietnam. In order to explore the relationship between their intra-national travel behaviour and their familiarisation with the new home, My examines their intra-national travel motivations, patterns and experiences using a qualitative research approach.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Material Weakness in Internal Control and Stock Price Crash Risk: Evidence from SOX Section 404 Disclosure

Date: 18 October 2013

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Assistant Professor Zhou Jie, National University of Singapore Business School, Singapore

Abstract:

This seminar investigates the unexplored questions of whether and how the presence of undisclosed internal control weaknesses (ICWs) and their initial disclosure differentially influence the likelihood of extreme negative outliers occur in firm-specific return distributions, which we refer to as stock price crash risk.

Bio:

Dr Zhou gained her PhD in Accounting from Northwestern University, and has been at NUS since 2012. Her research interests include Analyst Forecasts; Discretionary Disclosure; Financial Reporting Quality.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law.

Unconstrained by a Constitutional Balanced Budget Constraint - Retrospective and Rational Voting in a Political Forecast Cycle Model

Date: 18 October 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Speaker: Dr Frank Bohn, Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands) and University of Auckland

Abstract:

The discussion on constitutional fiscal rules was ignited, once again, because European governments demonstrated how to sidestep the Stability and Growth Pact Criteria. In Germany, for instance, this lead to the introduction of the debt brake which applies for both the national and state governments. Against this backdrop, this paper uses an electoral forecast cycle model to explain the empirical finding that US state governments can circumvent constitutional balanced budget constraints. Compared to the political budget cycle literature three results emerge: (i) the government can use another instrument, overly optimistic revenue forecasts, but the mechanism for improving re-election chances is basically the same; (ii) allowing for retrospective voting besides rational voting by uninformed voters contradicts theoretical (and empirical) findings by Shi and Svensson (2006); and (iii) as already suspected by Boylan (2008), the cycle becomes particularly virulent, if the government correctly anticipates a recession; political opportunism produces, unintentionally, countercyclical policies.

Bio:

Dr Bohn joined the Department of Economics in September 2006. Before that he was a lecturer at Essex University (UK) and University College Dublin (Ireland). His PhD was from Heidelberg University (simulation analysis on "Monetary Union and the Trade-Off between Interest and Exchange Rate Impulses"). More recently, Frank's interest in macroeconomics has extended into public choice and political economy. He has several papers in public finance, monetary economics and international economics incorporating political instability, corruption, rent-seeking, time-inconsistency, disinformation and/or political budget and forecast cycles. His most recent (2013) publications are in the Journal of International Money and Finance and the Journal of Economics and Statistics (forthcoming).

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Local Authority Elections: Trends, Outcomes and Significance

Date: 18 October 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Dr Mike Reid, Principal Policy Advisory, Local Government New Zealand

Abstract:

Democracy began at the local level and, as the maxim "all politics is local" reminds, we forget it at our peril. Elections give us an insight into how local politics are perceived by citizens. Voter turnout, and the way in which turnout varies between different communities, tells us something about the strength of citizenship within the country and how this may be influenced by decisions about the way councils are structured, what they do and how they operate. Local government in New Zealand is once again on the cusp of a major period of change. Mayors and councillors are likely to become a rare commodity in the future if some of the grand reform plans currently promoted finally eventuate – so the 2013 elections may be our last opportunity to vote for a local government system that has now been in place for twenty five years.

This session will provide an initial assessment of the 2013 local authority elections, including administration, promotion and citizen interest. Turnout figures will be examined to identify trends in voting over time and between different areas of New Zealand different kinds of councils and potential lessons discussed. Comparisons will also be made with turnout in other countries.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

China Visitor Market: Opportunities and Challenges

Date: 9 October 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Robyn Henderson, Manager Tourism Policy, Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment

Abstract:

China is our second largest and fastest growing visitor market and it is expected to continue to grow at a rapid pace so presents significant opportunities for New Zealand. However, Chinese visitors also have very different needs, wants and preferences from our traditional Western markets, as well as lower rates of satisfaction. In 2012 the  Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment led the ‘China Market Review’, a 100-day joint public-private sector project aimed at identifying the necessary actions to enable New Zealand to capture the full potential of the market. The review report was presented to the PM and Minister of Tourism in late 2012, and he launched it publicly during his trip to China in April 2013. MBIE is now working with key stakeholders on implementing the review recommendations, as well as exploring additional ambitious actions. The activities and changes currently focus on China will serve as a template for our approach to other emerging Asian markets.

This seminar will address the challenges and opportunities that arise from the China visitor market, and will provide an overview over the ‘China Market Review, as well as the implications that arose from it and the actions that are currently undertaken.

Bio:

Robyn Henderson is the Manager of Tourism Policy with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.The Tourism Policy team is responsible for policy advice on enhancing productivity and growing the value of tourism, New Zealand’s second largest export sector. The team works with key stakeholders such as Tourism New Zealand, and provides advice to the Minister of Tourism (Prime Minister Rt Hon John Key) on challenges for the sector, and opportunities to leverage the broader benefits of tourism to the New Zealand economy.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

An Ethnic Construction of Accountability

Date: 8 October 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Associate Professor Vassili Joannides, Queensland University of Technology

Abstract:

Purpose – We contribute to the accounting literature highlighting the potency of ethnicity by questioning how ethnic day-to-day practices make sense of and operationalize external accountability demands.

Design/methodology/approach – We addressed the research question through a rich ethnography of a Salvation Army Zimbabwean-Mancunian congregation in the UK confronted with the operationalization of their denomination’s policy. Methodologically, ethnomethodology principles informed this study, influenced by the approaches to ethnicity of Efferin and Hopper (2007) and Wickramasinghe, Hopper and Rathnasiri (2005).

Findings – Our findings indicate that the conceivers and guardians of an accountability system view accountability as it is thought and interiorized (emic), whereas those expected to practise the system regard it as it appears and seems to be functioning (etic). Conversely, conceivers and guardians see practices as they appear (etic) and not as they are thought and interiorized (emic). Thus it seems that practices’ deviating from the prescriptions of a formal accountability system reveal an etic-emic misunderstanding on both sides.

Originality/value – We offer a working conceptualisation of ethnicity, a concept ill-defined in the accounting literature. To this end, we show the potency of ethnicity as a working cultural unit feeding our understanding of both accounting and accountability. There has been little exploration of the ethnic construction of accountability in prior accountability studies.

Limitations – Our findings are limited to the observation of the collision of one ethnic group’s emics with the emics of accountability conceivers. Further, the solution found might not be applicable to multi-ethnic settings characterized by more than just two etics and emics.

Bio:

Vassili Joannides holds three masters degrees -- one in arts, one in finance and one in accounting education -- as well as a PhD in management control from Université Paris Dauphine / Manchester Business School (UK). He is also an entrepreneur and a consultant, as he is the vice-president and partner of De Burg & Associés specialising in the art market. His teaching mainly focuses on the human, organisational, political, social and strategic aspects of management control/accounting, rejecting computations and economics. Beyond management control, Vassili lectures on corporate governance and accountability as well as epistemology and research methods in numerous programmes. His research is on ethics and the religious foundations of accounting and management practices, ethnicity and gender in management control, the management of nonprofits and workers' cooperatives, international management control systems and epistemology.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Mobilising People to Protect and Restore our Environment: The Roles of Paradigms, Cosmologies, Theories, Values and Beliefs

Date: 4 October 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building Annex, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Dr Rick Boven, Stakeholder Strategies

Abstract:

We have all become familiar with reports of emerging environmental constraints such as climate change, ecosystem decline and resource scarcities. Scientists, activists and many global institutions are warning that we must change course to avoid dire consequences. But how should we interpret those reports, and how should we respond?

Most research on environmental issues focuses on understanding the nature of emerging risks and specifying the technical and policy solutions that should be adopted in response. There is less effort and therefore limited understanding of how best to mobilise societies to implement those solutions.

The way we think about environmental issues affects the outcomes we will experience. In recent years the long term mutual dependence of economy and environment has been widely recognised. However, important short term trade-offs must be managed well so that there is an appealing long term future. Incompatible climate and energy policies, the conflict between long term risk and short term growth goals and our inability to translate understanding into change are symptoms of a deeper failure to integrate historical, psychological and social thinking into our environment management paradigm.

Einstein pointed out that we cannot solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them. In this talk, Rick will explore how we think about our environment, explain why we manage the environment the way we do, identify alternative approaches, and offer some ways we can overcome obstacles to change.

Bio:

Rick Boven is a professional strategist leading Auckland based consultancy Stakeholder Strategies. His work experience includes being a think tank director, partner in a leading strategic management consultancy (BCG), social science researcher, technology entrepreneur, university researcher and teacher, and company director. Rick's qualifications include an MA in psychology, an MBA and a PhD in environment management. He is an accredited fellow of the Institute of Directors.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

On the Influence of the Regulatory Environment on Economic Growth

Date: 4 October 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Bartosz Witkowski, Warsaw School of Economics, Poland

Abstract:

The study examines the relationship between the regulatory variables and economic growth on the basis of Bayesian model pooling applied to Blundell and Bond’s GMM system estimator. The areas of regulations (institutions) are measured by the following indicators: index of economic freedom, worldwide governance indicators, democracy index, doing business indicators, transition indicators. The models are estimated based on overlapping panel data and they include nonlinearities. In general, regulatory environment is an important determinant of economic growth. To achieve rapid growth, it is necessary to increase economic freedom, quality of governance, and market reforms. The association between regulatory variables and GDP dynamics is mostly nonlinear. The countries with greater scope of economic freedom record more rapid GDP growth but a given increase in economic freedom has a higher impact on growth in those countries that are economically not (or partly) free. However, the results are not robust in a lot of areas – with regard to the sample of countries, the exact measure of the regulatory variable, and the type of nonlinear impact (concave vs. convex functions). There are many factors affecting both regulations and GDP dynamics as well as many transmission channels between these areas and the results sometimes are mixed.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Putting the Creative (Back) into Academic Writing for Business

Date: 4 October 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr John Dumay, University of Sydney Business School

Abstract:

Why is academic writing so boring? This paper explores the question to discover if we can put the creative (back) into academic writing for business, using a diagram outlining how creative academic data and non‐fiction writing fit together. The presentation will provide examples of creative (and not so creative) academic writing outlining how creative and academic writing can go hand in hand. It will also offer advice from empirical studies and personal experience about developing the craft of creative academic writing, dealing with writing myths, how to write cleaner, crisper and creative prose, and offer some tools to help with spelling, grammar and copy editing. It concludes by arguing how we need to change the way we communicate our research findings because it will become a matter of survival in our 'publish or perish' culture

Bio:

John Dumay is a Senior Lecturer in Accounting and specialises in teaching Management Accounting. He worked for over 15 years as an independent business consultant across a wide variety of industries before joining academia after completing his PhD in 2008. Entitled Intellectual Capital in Action: Australian Studies won the prestigious Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Award for 2008 for the Knowledge Management category. John continues to research on the topic of intellectual capital, sustainability reporting and innovation, and his research activities are closely linked with management practice.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be followed by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

NZ Power – Mainstream or Mad?

Date: 1 October 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Ben Gerritsen, Managing Director, Castalia Strategic Advisors

Abstract:

The Labour Party and the Greens have made electricity sector restructuring a key plank of their 2014 election campaign. Their proposal to replace New Zealand’s wholesale electricity market with a central buyer (known as "NZ Power") has been variously described as "common in many jurisdictions overseas" and "barking mad". Surely it can’t be both? This session explores the lessons that international experience holds for NZ Power – and what the experience tells us about the merits of the NZ Power policy.

Bio:

Ben Gerritsen is Castalia’s Managing Director in New Zealand. Ben joined Castalia’s Washington DC office in 2007, where he worked on international energy sector reform and regulation. Since returning to New Zealand in 2009, Ben has advised on several electricity reform initiatives including the establishment of the Electricity Authority, asset transfers between SOEs, and transmission pricing.

Co-hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation and the Law and Economics Association of New Zealand. Tea and coffee will be provided from midday, seminar to commence at 12.30pm. This is a free seminar, but RSVP to iscr@vuw.ac.nz or phone (04) 463-5562.

Time Separability, Wealth Effects and International Business Cycles

Date: 27 September 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Alexandre Dmitriev, University of Tasmania

Abstract:

This paper addresses the international comovement puzzle. International real business cycle models tend to predict negative cross-country correlations of investment and employment. In the data these correlations are positive. To reconcile the theory with the data the literature has resorted to financial frictions and new sources of disturbances. We show that a model driven by productivity shocks alone can account for the comovement puzzle in a complete markets environment. Our two-country model with imperfectly substitutable traded intermediate goods features time nonseparable preferences that allow arbitrarily small wealth effects on labor supply. It reconciles with the data by predicting (i) positive cross-country correlations of investment and hours worked; (ii) a plausible cross-country correlation of output; and (iii) countercyclical net exports. Although our model cannot reproduce the observed volatility of relative prices, it improves slightly on standard approaches. Unlike models with incomplete markets, ours show little sensitivity to the degree of persistence or international spillovers of the shocks.

Bio:

Alexandre Dmitriev is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Economics and Finance at the University of Tasmania. He is also an Australian Research Council DECRA fellow and a research associate at the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis at the Australian National University.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Antipodeans' in Europe: Long Distance, Long Stay Youth Mobility

Date: 25 September 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Christian Schott, Tourism Management Group, School of Management

Abstract:

While long term travel has received research attention in a variety of guises, spanning drifters and explorers, long term budget travellers, and the most established term backpackers, a distinctively Antipodean flow of young long term travellers to Europe has received relatively little attention in tourism. This group consists predominantly of New Zealanders, Australians and more recently South Africans who have been highly visible mobile residents of areas such as London’s Earls Court since the 1960s. Due to the trip length of commonly three to five years this group epitomises the blurred boundary between tourism and international mobility in the context of the youth life stage. Apart from the unusual trip length other reasons for this group deserving greater research attention are the motivations for these long departures from their home countries and their often fluid roles from employee to traveller and back as they dip in and out of the job market.

This seminar explores the travel and work dimension of this experience, as well as the experience itself through the eyes of the young Antipodeans. Additionally, a comparative layer will be applied by comparing and contrasting the dominant three nationality groups, New Zealanders, Australians and South Africans, who anecdotally exhibit many commonalities.

Bio:

Dr Christian Schott is a Senior Lecturer in Tourism Management at Victoria University of Wellington. His research interests cover three broad areas of tourism. Firstly, he is interested in the tourist-environment interface with particular focus on the impacts of tourism and sustainable tourism development. This area of work has seen him engaged in research projects in the Sub-Antarctic, the Pacific and New Zealand. Secondly, he studies the ‘youth’ life stage in the context of tourism, exploring aspects such as travel motivations and self-development of young adventurous travellers. An extension of this research focus on young peoples’ experiences is Christian’s deep interest in tourism higher education, both from a conceptual and a practice perspective.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Valuing Nature and the Problem of Incommensurable Values

Date: 13 September 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Dr Geoff Bertram, Senior Associate, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Abstract:

This seminar will discuss the issues that arise in adjudication of conflicts between monetary values arising in the market sphere and incommensurable values from the environmental sphere that are not reducible or convertible to money terms. The issues are addressed through a survey of relevant literature and a review of some recent environment cases under the RMA.

Bio:

Geoff Bertram was until June 2009 a Senior Lecturer in Economics at Victoria. His research interests include regulation of public utility industries such as electricity, gas and telecommunications; economic and political development of small island societies with a particular focus on the Pacific; the design of policies to address climate change; and the long-run evolution of the New Zealand economy. He has over 100 publications including more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles, books, and book chapters. He served on the Council of the International Association for Energy Economics from 2005 to 2007 and convened the Association's annual conference in Wellington in 2007. He has been a member of the editorial boards of a number of international journals including World Development, Environment and Development Economics, and Asia Pacific Viewpoint. He speaks regularly at international conferences on energy, climate change and small-island issues.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Introduction to the Financial Markets Conduct Bill

Date: 13 September 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Trish Keeper, Senior Lecturer at the School of Accounting and Commercial Law

Abstract:

This presentation will provide an overview of the changes to be introduced in the next few years once the Financial Markets Conduct Bill becomes law. These changes include significant changes to fund raising laws, the centralisation and co-ordination of the rules governing managed investment schemes, derivatives, and enforcement.

Bio:

Trish Keeper teaches and researches in the areas of Corporate Law, Securities Law and Corporate Governance. Trish is an active researcher who regularly publishes and presents at academic and professional conferences on current issues in corporate insolvency law, company law and corporate governance.

She has presented for the New Zealand Law Society and Brookers, and was the Insol International Scholar for the Asia Pacific Rim for 2009-2010. Trish is also currently undertaking collaborative capital markets research on board composition and other corporate governance practices of New Zealand listed companies.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Renewable Energy Futures to 2050: Current Thinking and Options for Cities

Date: 12 September 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4

Speaker: Dr Eric Martinot, Institute for Sustainable Energy Policies, Tokyo / Victoria University of Wellington

Abstract:

Dr. Martinot will present some findings from his recent work, the REN21 Renewables Global Futures Report. This report provides a pioneering synthesis of the full range of credible possibilities for the future of renewable energy. The report is not one scenario or viewpoint, but captures the contemporary thinking of 170 leading experts from around the world, including CEOs and parliamentarians, as expressed in face-to-face interviews with the report author. The report also incorporates the results of 50 recently published and prominent energy scenarios by a range of organizations. The report looks at future shares of energy, investment levels, technology development, and the range of integration options for electric power grids, buildings, industry, and transport. The report also highlights the role of local governments and presents visions, practices, and policies for incorporating renewable energy at the local/city level.

Bio:

Dr. Eric Martinot is an internationally recognized scholar, writer, and teacher on the subject of renewable energy. He is report author of the just-released REN21 Renewables Global Futures Report, and was lead author until 2010 of the REN21 Renewables Global Status Report, an annual synthesis that he first created in 2005. He currently serves as senior research director with the Institute for Sustainable Energy Policies in Tokyo and teaching fellow with Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. He also maintains research affiliations with the Worldwatch Institute and the Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association, and is an editorial board member for the journal Energy Policy. He lived in Beijing for three years as senior visiting scholar at Tsinghua University, and was formerly a senior energy specialist with the World Bank. He has written 70 publications on renewable and sustainable energy since 1990, and holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley and a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Building Trade Infrastructure with China and Asia-Pacific Countries: VAT/GST Challenges for Businesses, Governments and Researchers

Date: 6 September 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

The seminar will be chaired by Robin Oliver, MNZM, Director, Oliver Shaw, and former Deputy Commissioner of IRD. Associate Professor David White will talk about his research carried out in the Asia-Pacific region in 2012 on the Asia-Pacific VAT/GST research and stakeholder network gaps and possible ways of addressing these challenges. John Cantin and Marie Pallot will give business advisor and official perspectives on the topic.

Abstract:

In June 2013 a New Zealand ministerial task force was formed to review all risks in the New Zealand-to-China supply chain. Trade Minister Tim Groser asked all agencies ‘to reflect carefully on their own long-term strategies’ and proposed increased investment in the ‘infrastructure’ of the China-New Zealand trade relationship. Tax law and practice are a key trade risk. In New Zealand’s trade relationships with China and a large number of Asia-Pacific countries, major tax risks are VAT/GST and other sales taxes on goods and services. These taxes form the largest single source of central government revenue in China, as they do in many low and middle income countries in the Asia-Pacific. They have growing importance to state-building and good governance throughout the region.

The VAT/GST is a young tax first implemented in Europe in the 1950s. It is a ‘legal transplant’ in the Asia-Pacific: still being implemented in China 30 years after small initial steps in 1984; adopted fully in New Zealand in 1986; and adopted in most other Asia-Pacific countries except, most notably, in the USA, Malaysia (and India). This seminar seeks to identify major VAT/GST challenges for businesses, governments and researchers in the region and to discuss some work currently being undertaken by these three groups and its possible impact on New Zealand and its businesses.

Bio:

David White is currently developing an Asia-Pacific VAT/GST research project. He initiated the ‘Comprehensive, single standard-rate GST/VAT project’, which has commemorated and studied the design and implementation of NZ GST and its relevance for other countries (2005 onwards). He is a member of an international, multidisciplinary group which compares VAT/GST regimes and approaches to current problems and assesses their impact (2010-14). John Cantin will provide a business advisor perspective, including an overview of how indirect tax systems in China, ASEAN countries, Australia and Canada compare to New Zealand’s GST.

John Cantin will provide a business advisor perspective, including an overview of how indirect tax systems in China, ASEAN countries, Australia and Canada compare to New Zealand’s GST. He is a Tax Partner, KPMG, focusing mainly on corporate tax and has a particular interest in GST and tax policy. Marie Pallot will discuss the OECD work developing guidelines to address uncertainty and risks of double taxation and unintended non-taxation by VAT regimes, specifically focusing on trade in services and intangibles. Marie is a Policy Manager, Inland Revenue Department, and Chair, OECD Committee on Fiscal Affairs' Working Party No 9 on Consumption Taxes.

This Business Links Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR), in association with the NZ Contemporary China Research Centre. RSVP (attendance only) to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz by Thursday 5 September.

Climate Confusion: Why the International Climate Change Negotiations Have Unraveled

Date: 5 September 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 501

Speaker: Professor Stephen Howes, Australian National University

Abstract:

In 2009 (Copenhagen) and 2010 (Cancun), the world decided to move away from a top-down (Kyoto) approach to a more flexible bottom-up approach to tackling climate change. But in Durban (2011), we decided (apparently) to go back to a top-down approach. Subsequent negotiations, however, have revealed deep splits between powerful countries. How did we get into this mess, and what are the prospects for getting out of it?

Bio:

Professor Stephen Howes is the Director of the Australian National University's Development Policy Centre. He is also Director of the International and Development Economics teaching program at the ANU's Crawford School of Public Policy. Prior to joining the Crawford School in 2009, Stephen was Chief Economist at the Australian Agency for International Development.

He worked from 1994 to 2005 at the World Bank, first in Washington and then in Delhi, where he was Lead Economist for India. In 2008, he worked on the Garnaut Review on Climate Change, where he managed the Review's international work stream. Stephen serves as a Board Member for CARE Australia. He has previously served on the Board of the Pacific Institute of Public Policy, and on the Advisory Council of the Asian Development Bank Institute.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Creating a Safety Climate in New Zealand: Moving beyond Pike River and the Taskforce Report

Date: 3 September 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

The tragedy at the Pike River Coal Mine and the ongoing loss of lives in workplace accidents has brought into sharp focus the issues that New Zealand faces in terms of workplace health and safety.

The Report of the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety in New Zealand, with its comprehensive and far-reaching recommendations, proposes a revolution in the way in which we deal with the issue.

This seminar aims to flesh out the recommendations through expert comment from researchers and policy people, workplace managers, unions and practitioners in the field. It is organised by the Industrial Relations Centre and the Victoria University School of Law as part of our programme to foster discussion, research and education in the area of employment and work.

Download the Programme & Registration Form, or for further information contact:

Sue Ryall
Centre Manager, Industrial Relations Centre
Phone: 04 463 5143
Email: sue.ryall@vuw.ac.nz

 

Seminar/Workshop Series - 1: Not-for-Profit Structures, Reporting and Accountability

Date: 2 September 2013

Time: 8.00 am

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatres 1 & 2

Keynote Speakers:
Professor Geoff McLay, Law Commissioner; Brendon Ward, General Manager, Charities, Department of Internal Affairs; David McLay, Barrister; Jenny Prince, Chief Executive Officer, Plunket

Workshops:
Dr Carolyn Cordery, Senior Lecturer at SACL; Andrew Babbage, Deloitte; Robyn Walker, Deloitte


Background:

Recent reports (including the Law Commission’s report on Incorporated Societies and the DIA report on structures for Social Enterprises) raise questions about organisational structure. Choices made affect operational structures, organisational reporting and governance.

In this seminar/workshop you will be challenged to consider:

  • What changes are occurring in the structure and regulation of not-for-profit entities?
  • Is your organisational structure the right one for your operations?
  • How does the choice of structure affect your reporting obligations?
  • What reporting choices allow your organisation to respond to demands for local and national accountability?

The Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research is pleased to invite you to the first of its Not-for-Profit Seminar Series:

Environmental Policy-Making in New Zealand, 1979-2013

Date: 23 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Gary Taylor (QSO), Chairman of the Environmental Defence Society

Abstract:

This presentation will focus on environmental policy-making in New Zealand during the period spanning the 1980s to the present day, reflecting on key policy decisions from our recent past including the genesis of the National Development Act, the institutional reforms of the late 1980s and the introduction of the Resource Management Act in 1991. It will trace the different ways in which environmental policy is made including present day issues as diverse as climate change, oceans management, marine reserves, offshore oil and gas exploration and resource management law, and describe the way current RMA reforms are being pursued by government and contrast that approach with collaborative initiatives in freshwater policy. The objective is to see if the past can illuminate the present, and commentary will be from the perspective of a participant in environmental policy making, in the speaker's role as Chairman of the Environmental Defence Society.

Bio:

Gary Taylor (MA (Hons), QSO) is the Executive Director and Chairman of the Environmental Defence Society. EDS is a boutique environmental law group that educates, litigates and does innovative thinking about environmental policy and governance. Gary has been an environmental advocate and policy analyst for more than 30 years. He also has extensive experience in the corporate management of organisations, having been the Chairman of the Auckland Area Health Board, the Climate Change and Business Centre (Australia) and the Peoples Centre Health Trust. He has been a director of Watercare Services Ltd, Infrastructure Auckland, Auckland Regional Transport Authority and the Hobsonville Land Company. He has also been a regional and city councillor. Gary brings his extensive experience in environmental policy and corporate governance to his lecture.

Hosted by the School of Government; RSVP not required.

Evidence from Employee Deposit Programs in Japan

Date: 23 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Takeshi Yamada, University of Adelaide

Abstract:

Using a sample of 2104 Japanese firms, we investigate the effect of employee deposits -- a form of employee inside debt -- on firms’ risk-taking behavior. After controlling for endogeneity and reverse causality in a variety of ways, including a difference-in- difference (DID) analysis around a law change that determined the priority of employee deposits in bankruptcy, we find that firms with more employee deposit are associated with significantly lower total risk, systematic risk, and idiosyncratic risk. Moreover, this risk-reducing effect is mainly concentrated among firms that are not affiliated with keiretsu groups or main banks, so that the potential for bailout is limited. We also find that the presence of employee deposits moderates the investment response to market volatility, thereby increasing the debt value of the firm. Finally, we show that employee deposits are positively related to the firm's leverage ratio, suggesting a lower cost of borrowing associated with the risk-reducing effect of employee deposits. Overall, our results indicate that the holding of the company’s debt by its employees can reduce the agency costs of debt.

Bio:

Professor Takeshi Yamada's research field covers empirical research in financial markets. Some of his research projects examine the relation between size premium and the preference of institutional investors, value premium and the behavior of individual investors. Other interests include institutional short selling, mutual fund behaviour, and how public information affect the investor trades.

Takeshi is also interested in how government institutions affect private firms and financial markets. One of his research projects examines the incentives of the government to maintain control in privatized state-owned companies in China. He also has a research project that examines the corporate demand for political connections of Japanese firms.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Variation in Risk Seeking Behavior in a Natural Experiment on Large Losses Induced by a Natural Disaster

Date: 22 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr David Savage, Queensland Behavioural Economics Group, School of Economics and Finance at Queensland University of Technology

Abstract:

This study explores people's risk attitudes after having suffered large real-world losses following a natural disaster. Using the margins of the 2011 Australian floods (Brisbane) as a natural experimental setting, we find that homeowners who were victims of the floods and face large losses in property values are 50% more likely to opt for a risky gamble – a scratch card giving a small chance of a large gain ($500,000) – than for a sure amount of comparable value ($10). This finding is consistent with prospect theory predictions of the adoption of a risk-seeking attitude after a loss.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

What Goes On Tour: Tourism, Intercultural Dialogue and a Māori Exhibition on the Global Stage

Date: 21 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Lee Davidson, Senior Lecturer, Museum & Heritage Studies

Abstract:

Museums function as key tourist attractions and sites of intercultural dialogue, while touring exhibitions are an increasingly popular form of cultural diplomacy. The intention is to promote a positive image of the country abroad, bolstering cultural and economic opportunities including tourism and trade. For host institutions, exhibitions of globally significant cultural heritage draw in audiences and generate revenue. Yet despite the widely accepted value of touring exhibitions, very little research has examined their efficacy. This seminar discusses the first transnational, comparative study of a touring exhibition.

Te Papa’s E Tū Ake: Standing Strong portrays Māori culture to an international audience. Presenting preliminary findings from in-depth visitor interviews at three venues (Paris, Mexico and Quebec) I consider the shifting impact of the exhibition as it moves from one cultural context to the next, and illustrate how cosmopolitan visitors ‘intersect’ international exhibitions at multiple points. This illuminates what happens when culture ‘goes on tour’ and raises important questions about the role of museums in promoting interculturality.

Bio:

Dr Lee Davidson teaches in the Museum and Heritage Studies programme at VUW and previously in Recreation and Leisure Studies. Her research interests include nature-based leisure, aspects of sustainability in tourism practices and the links between heritage, travel and interculturality. She is a board member of the Australia and New Zealand Association for Leisure Studies and enjoys alpine recreation and cultural tourism.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Does New Zealand Need Media Reform?

Date: 16 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Dr Bryce Edwards, University of Otago

Abstract:

  • Is the media a watchdog for democracy?
  • How have changes in the media environment altered the way that the news media hold power to account?
  • How well is New Zealand served by the mainstream media?
  • Are political journalists up to the task of covering government and Parliament?
  • What role is played by social media in 'speaking truth to power' and covering politics?
  • To what extent is reform required in the media landscape?

These are the questions that are addressed, amongst others, in research by Dr Bryce Edwards for Transparency International about the integrity and health of the media in New Zealand. He will be explaining his research findings in this lecture.

Bio:

Bryce joined the Politics department at Otago University in 2007 as his first academic position, teaching New Zealand politics, public policy, and public management. His other research interests include political parties, elections, social inequality, class, political movements, political finance, political communication, e-politics, and sociology.

Prior to teaching, Bryce worked as a policy analyst in government departments in both New Zealand and the United Kingdom. His PhD, completed in 2003, was on Political Parties in New Zealand: A Study of Ideological and Organisational Transformation.

Bryce has extensively researched political finance in New Zealand, and is currently working on a book about the history of political finance in New Zealand up to and including the first year of the Electoral Finance Act in operation.

Hosted by the School of Government; RSVP not required.

Out of Control? Where Are We Headed With Accounting Standard Setting?

Date: 15 August 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Professor David Emanuel, 2013 Don Trow Visiting Fellow

Abstract:

The establishment of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) was regarded as a major milestone in the harmonisation of accounting practices across countries. Currently, in excess of 100 countries state that they have adopted international financial reporting standards. Early research shows a reduction in firms’ cost of capital, some across-industry information flows positively affecting investment decisions, and a reduction in home country investment bias, at least among countries that have good legal enforcement provisions, with the greatest gains being in countries with German derived code-law legal systems. However more recently there has been a growing disquiet about the effect of international accounting standards on financial reporting, and this disquiet is not restricted to large listed enterprises.

At this seminar, David Emanuel looks at two current issues affecting financial reporting. The first is the on-going work on the Conceptual Framework, and the second is the recently released second exposure draft on accounting for leases, which is a joint (US) Financial Accounting Standards Board/IASB project. His view is that both of these projects have major problems, and some of these problems will be discussed at this seminar. He also will talk briefly about the (lack of) accountability that is a feature of the IASB setup.

Bio:

David Emanuel is a Professor at the University of Auckland and the Don Trow Visiting Fellow at Victoria University of Wellington for 2013. His major research interests are empirical, looking at issues around earnings quality, capital market reactions to events of interest which vary from earnings announcements through to the demise of Arthur Andersen, and share price associations with disclosures across different countries. He also has a long-standing interest in the governance of state owned enterprises in New Zealand.

Recent publications have been in the Journal of Banking and Finance, Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory, International Journal of Case Studies in Management, Australian Journal of Management, and Accounting Horizons. David is a Life Member of the New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants, with his major professional involvement being in the post-tertiary programme of entry into the profession, and accounting standard setting.

This Business Links Seminar is hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research (CATGR). It will be preceded by light refreshments on the Mezzanine Floor of Rutherford House at 5.30pm; attendance is free but places are limited, so RSVP (attendance only) to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz by Monday 12 August.

 

Failure to Rescue - A New Zealand Nursing Perspective

Date: 15 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Station West Wing, RWW 501


This event is a re-scheduling of last month’s WHEG seminar series which was cancelled due to the 21 July 2013 earthquake.

Speaker: Dr Léonie Walker, Principal Researcher, New Zealand Organisation of Nurses & Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Nursing and Midwifery, Victoria University

Abstract:

Twenty years since the term "Failure to Rescue" (FTR) entered the literature as a measureable outcome of too few nursing personnel, inadequate skill mix or omission of care, a synthesis of the many further developments of the ideas and methodologies behind FTR research world-wide demonstrates robustly the value of high quality nursing work to patient outcome, healthcare system costs and job satisfaction among nurses. FTR has been firmly and consistently attributed to hospital characteristics and resource management systems rather than to patient characteristics or individual nurse inadequacy. It is significantly costly for patients, health systems and nurses.

An evidence base specific to these three areas is presented, with an emphasis where available on New Zealand-specific research. Evidence based nursing provision / patient acuity response (Care Point), currently being rolled out across DHBs in New Zealand will also be briefly presented.

Bio:

Dr Léonie Walker has a PhD in Immunology and a diverse employment history as an academic researcher, Principle Scientific Officer in applied Immunology in a hospital setting, and a role in NHS health research management with direct project work on public health topics ranging from HIV to obesity and diabetes. She was involved in the establishment of the North East England Diabetes Research Network, based within the Clinical Research Facility at the University of Newcastle, and a management role overseeing the specialist diabetes research nursing team.

In 2008 Léonie moved to New Zealand to take up the position of researcher with the New Zealand Organisation of Nurses, where she has been working on nursing workforce issues ever since.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Social and Economic Dimensions of Resource Management: Experiments on Public Goods and Common Pool Resources with Endogenous Risk and Benefits

Date: 15 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Barry Sopher, Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick, US

Abstract:

This paper reports on laboratory analysis of public goods provision and common pool resource management.  We study both the economic and the social dimensions of public goods provision and common pool resource situations by considering alternative sharing rules (proportional to wealth or equal sharing), distributions of initial endowments, or harvesting rights (equal or unequal), and risk (low or high risk of losing endowments if the public good is not provided or maintained, or of losing future benefits from a resource if it is over-used). We are motivated to study these problems by actual proposed World Bank projects for addressing climate change in developing countries such as India and Bangladesh.

Bio:

Barry Sopher is Professor of Economics at Rutgers University. His research is concerned with experimental analysis of individual and group decision making, including decision making under uncertainty, intertemporal choice, bargaining, and learning in games. His most recent research is concerned with the impact of advice in intergenerational games, with particular focus on the evolution of conventions and on efficiency in coordination games. Sopher is the director of the Wachtler Experimental Economics Laboratory at Rutgers University. He is also a Research Affiliate of the Center for Experimental Social Science at New York University and a Research Fellow of IZA, the German Institute for the Study of Labor.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Urban Growth Management in Seven New World Cities: Aligning Urban Planning Visions and Outcomes

Date: 14 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

Speakers: Professor Errol Haarhoff and Dr Lee Beattie, University of Auckland

Abstract:

What implications do urban growth strategies have for achieving high quality urban design outcomes in our cities? Vancouver, Portland, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Auckland have all adopted similar growth management policies to counter the adverse effects of suburban sprawl by seeking to consolidate most of their future growth within their existing town centres and along transit corridors. However, outcomes in these cities are very different, so what explains these differences?

Professor Errol Haarhoff and Lee Beattie from the School of Architecture and Planning, University of Auckland, will discuss what we can learn from the experiences of these cities, and how their policies are leading to anticipated outcomes, including market acceptance and investment in higher density, quality housing and sustainable urban form.

About Errol Haarhoff and Lee Beattie:

Errol Haarhoff is Professor of Architecture at the School of Architecture and Planning, University of Auckland. Errol holds qualifications in architecture, urban design and urban planning and, as Deputy Head of Urban Design, coordinates the Master of Urban Design programme. His teaching expertise includes studio-based architecture and urban design, urban design theory, urban settlement history and the history of the modern movement. His research is focused on urban design, urban growth management and housing intensification. He has recently led a number of funded research projects related to urban growth management and housing intensification in Pacific Rim cities, and is a regular contributor to conferences and serves on journal boards. Errol is a member of the New Zealand Institute of Architects, the International Planning History Society and the Urban Design Forum.

Lee Beattie is Head of Urban Planning at the School of Architecture and Planning, University of Auckland. Lee is an urban planner with 20 years professional experience. He specialises in urban planning policy development and implementation, growth management and urban design research and providing Environment Court evidence. He is currently involved in a number of research projects considering urban growth management, higher density housing topologies and urban design implementation issues in a range of Pacific Rim (Australasian and North American) new world cities. He is a full member of the New Zealand Planning Institute and the Urban Design Forum.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Learning from Public Entities' Use of Social Media

Date: 13 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4

Presenters: Tom Haslam & Gary Emery, Office of the Auditor-General

Background:

In 2012/13, the theme of the Office of the Auditor General’s work programme has been Our future needs – is the public sector ready? The focus is on how public agencies prioritise work, develop necessary capabilities and skills, and use information to identify and address future needs.

As part of this theme, eight entities who are using social media have been looked at -- seven public entities and one non-government organisation that receive much of their funding from the Government. Public agencies are still developing their use of social media, but the OAG wanted to point to emerging practices or lessons and collate some critical success factors that could be useful to other public entities.

Bio:

Tom Haslam has worked at the Office of the Auditor-General since October 2011. Before that, he was in the UK's Audit Commission, in local government, and in the private sector. He has a Bachelor of Science, Master of Science in Engineering, MBA, and Diploma in Marketing. Tom is fascinated by social media, and interested in how technology can drive efficiency and improve communications.

Gary Emery has worked at the Office of the Auditor-General since January 2011. Before that, he was with the UK’s Audit Commission and in local government (mainly in senior HR management). Gary has an MA in HR management and a diploma in public administration. Having spent 12 years working in performance audit, Gary is keen to answer questions about the work of the OAG.

An Online Engagement Community seminar, hosted by the Chair in e-Government. The seminar is free but please register your intention to attend by emailing e-government@vuw.ac.nz or phoning Lynn Barlow on 463 6966.

 

US Climate Change Policy and its Global Implications

Date: 9 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Professor Daniel Fiorino, American University, Washington

Abstract:

The United States historically has been one of the global leaders in identifying and responding to environmental issues. That leadership has been challenged in recent years for many reasons, most notably on the issue of climate change. What is the current status of US climate policy and the near-term prospects? What does this mean for international climate policy in coming decades?

Bio:

Daniel J. Fiorino is the Director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Executive in Residence in the School of Public Affairs at American University. As a faculty member in the Department of Public Administration and Policy, he teaches courses on environmental policy, energy and climate change, environmental sustainability, and public management. Dan is the author or co-author of four books and some three dozen articles and book chapters in his field.

His book, The New Environmental Regulation, won the Brownlow Award of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) for “excellence in public administration literature” in 2007. Altogether his publications have received nine national and international awards from the American Society for Public Administration, Policy Studies Organization, Academy of Management, and NAPA. In 2009 he was a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and he also serves as an advisor on environmental and sustainability issues.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Craft Mastery: Towards A Theory of Artful Leadership Action

Date: 9 August 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Steven S. Taylor, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA, US

Abstract:

Leadership is an art. This conception of leadership as art has recently been addressed seriously in academia in a variety of different ways. Hansen and colleagues have argued for an aesthetic approach to the phenomena, one that is based in direct sensory experience and felt meaning, one that is comfortable with the subjective, and inter-subjective nature of such experience, one that is always contextual, one that may be more concerned with artistic truths and divergent generalizability than with scientific conceptions of validity and reliability. This stands in stark contrast to the more scientific methods that have dominated social science research in recent times. Just as we have tended to try to understand leadership in a scientific way, there has also been a tendency to judge leadership in terms of the instrumental goals of the organization, whether that is winning a war or making enormous profits.

However, if we are to approach leadership from an aesthetic perspective and take seriously it’s fundamental craft nature, we need a different standard. Crafts in general have an instrumental purpose and we do not judge them solely on the instrumental results, we also judge them on their aesthetics – or artfulness. Similarly we can care about leadership action not just because it gets the job done, but because it is "working beautifully". This presentation offers a model of the characteristics of the craft process of leadership that lead to artfulness focusing on five characteristics, with the explicit causal relationship that the greater that characteristic is, the more artful the process will be:

  1. staying with your senses
  2. embodied sensemaking
  3. passion
  4. collaboration
  5. domain knowledge  

Bio: 

Dr. Steven S. Taylor is an associate professor in the WPI School of Business in Worcester, Massachusetts, the author of the book Leadership Craft, Leadership Art, the editor of the journal Organizational Aesthetics, and a playwright whose work has been performed in England, France, Poland, Canada, Denmark, New Zealand, Italy, Australia, and the US.

Hosted by the School of Management. All welcome, no RSVP required.

If Electricity Liberalisation Is So Great, Why Does Everybody Hate It?

Date: 7 August 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Professor James Bushnell, S.T. Lee Visiting Fellow

Abstract:

Attitudes towards the proper form of organisation and regulation of the electricity sector have shifted several times over the past two decades. These shifts include a wave of liberalisation that encompassed many regions of the world, and more recently a backlash against many of these policies. Drawing largely from the U.S. experience, this talk discusses the political economy of electricity restructuring and explores the economic arguments for and against liberalisation.

Bio:

Professor James Bushnell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California, Davis, and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to joining UC Davis, he spent 15 years as the Research Director of the University of California Energy Institute in Berkeley, and two years as the Cargill Chair in Energy Economics and Director of the Biobased Industry Center at Iowa State University. Prof. Bushnell received a PhD in Operations Research from U.C. Berkeley in 1993.

Prof. Bushnell has been actively involved in energy and environmental policy for over a decade. Since 2002, he has served as a member of the Market Surveillance Committee (MSC) of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). He is currently a member of the Emissions Market Assessment Committee, and advisory committee to the California Air Resources Board. Both the MSC and EMAC were established to provide independent external monitoring and analysis to complement the internal market analysis functions of the institutions they advise.

Hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation. This seminar will be followed by drinks and nibbles from 6.30pm; RSVP to iscr@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

From Camping Grounds to Holiday Parks to Resorts

Date: 7 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Fergus Brown, Chief Executive of the Holiday Accommodation Parks Association of NZ (HAPNZ)

Abstract:

Fergus Brown talks about the future of holiday parks in New Zealand. He looks at the major changes they have undergone throughout the years and what value this industry sector currently holds. Focusing on both domestic and international visitors, this seminar addresses the impact of the change in the international visitor mix on holiday parks and the role that domestic travellers will play in the future. Due to changes in the visitor profile, future holiday park customers will differ from the ones of the past, and their expectations towards a holiday park experience will be highlighted.

Bio:

Born in Wellington, Fergus worked for the New Zealand Tourism Department from 1975 and Tourism New Zealand from its inception. He spent two years as Private Secretary to the Minister of Tourism and has represented New Zealand in postings to Australia and Asia. In Asia he established the New Zealand Tourism Board’s Asian regional operation opening offices in Taiwan and South Korea before returning to New Zealand to take up an executive position in the TNZ’s Wellington Head Office. With his wife Renny they owned and operated a motor lodge and licensed restaurant for five years. During this time Fergus was Deputy Chairman of Go Wairarapa, the regions economic development and regional tourism organisation. Fergus is currently Chief Executive of the Holiday Accommodation Parks Association of NZ (HAPNZ) which is a full member of TIA and an allied member of TECNZ. He has been a Board member of the Tourism Industry Association of NZ since 2007 and is a trustee of the PATA New Zealand Trust.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Large-Scale Portfolio Optimization: An Improved Simulation Algorithm Based on Differential Evolution and Optimal Computing Budget Allocation

Date: 2 August 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Wei-han Liu, La Trobe Business School, La Trobe University, Melbourne

Abstract:

Differential evolution (DE) is one of the popular techniques in large-scale portfolio optimization which is noticed for its applications in problems which are non-convex, non-continuous, non-differentiable, etc. This technique suffers some shortcomings, e.g. unstable convergence in the final solution, trapped in local optimum, and demand for high number of replications. Optimal computing budget allocation technique (OCBA) (Chen and Lee 2010) gives an efficient way to reach the global optimum by optimally assigning computing resource among designs. The integration of DE and OCBA gives better performance in terms of convergence rate and the attained global optimum. The ordering of the integration also plays a vital role, i.e. the strategy of first applying DE before OCBA outperforms the inverse ordered one. In addition to numerical tests, empirical analysis of 100 stocks in S&P500 over a 10-year period confirms the conclusions.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Ethics and Public Policy: Is there a Place for Religious Values in the Public Square?

Date: 19 July 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Professor Andrew Bradstock, Howard Paterson Chair in Theology and Public Issues, University of Otago

Abstract:

In a secular country like New Zealand the suggestion that religious voices might contribute to discussion about public issues is generally viewed with alarm. Religion is considered a 'private' not a 'public' matter. Yet a secular public square should be one which, rather than excluding certain voices, is open to all, provided none is privileged. Moreover, religion has much to contribute to public and political discourse that is original and constructive.

Bio:

Professor Bradstock Andrew is Director of the University of Otago's Centre for Theology and Public Issues and first holder of the Howard Paterson Chair in Theology and Public Issues at the University. Founded in January 2009, the Centre promotes informed, values-based conversation around issues of current concern, and contributes to discussion in the public square from a theological perspective. The Centre at Otago is part of a network of similar international centres, the Global Network of Public Theology. A former co-director of the Centre for Faith and Society at the Von Hügel Institute, St Edmund's College, Cambridge, Andrew studied Theology and Politics at the University of Bristol before completing his PhD in Politics and Government at the University of Kent at Canterbury. He has published widely on the issue of inequality, both here and in the UK.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Lessons from 'Natural Experiments' with the UK Tax System: A Behavioural Perspective

Date: 19 July 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Simon James, University of Exeter Business School

Abstract:

The study of taxation reveals many 'natural experiements' which add to our understanding of taxpayer behaviour. Particularly spectacular examples include the situation which led to the Boston Tea Party of 1773 and the UK's unsuccessful community charge, often called the 'poll tax', of the early 1990s, where a failure to appreciate taxpayers' views regarding fairness led to unexpected outcomes. The use of behavoural economics to supplement mainstream analysis might not only reduce the risks of such tax disasters but also improve the development of tax reform more generally.

This paper shows how such additional explanatory power contributes to our understanding of the success or failure of UK tax policy arising from the 'natural experiements' of the successful introduction of value added tax in 1973, the contrasting difficulties associated with the community charge in 1990 and, more recently, the abolition of the 10% rate of income tax in 2008.

Bio:

Simon James is an Associate Professor in Economics in the Department of Management, a Chartered Tax Adviser, a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Taxation, a Fellow of the College of Teachers and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He has also held visiting positions at six universities overseas. He holds an MBA as well as Masters degrees in Economics, Law, Education and Educational Management, and the subject of his PhD was ‘Taxation and Economic Decisions.‘

Professor James has published over 60 research papers and his 15 books include The Economics of Taxation: Principles, Policy and Practice (with Chris Nobes), 12 th edition 20012 . He has also edited a four-volume collection of tax papers entitled Taxation: Critical Perspectives on the World Economy, published by Routledge in 2002, and is co-editor of Taxation: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Research, Oxford University Press, 2005. He has been awarded research grants by the ESRC (four grants), The British Academy, Nuffield Foundation, Inland Revenue and The Scottish Accountancy Trust for Education and Research.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Bank Lending Responses to the Official Cash Rate: Asymmetric and Coordinated Behavior in Residential Mortgage Rate Setting

Date: 18 July 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Andrew Worthington, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Queensland

Abstract:

This paper examines the short- and long-run relationships between the official cash rate used by the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) in the conduct of monetary policy and the standard variable mortgage rates of Australia’s Big-4 banks using weekly bank-level data from January 2001 to March 15 2012. For each of the banks included in the analysis (ANZ Bank, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, National Australia Bank and Westpac Banking Corporation) we specify an asymmetric short-run model in which deviations from the long-run path are corrected by three feedback coefficients capturing the three different types of disequilibria, namely, large and positive, large and negative, and small positive/negative.

The results provide convincing evidence of both amount (size) and 20 adjustment (speed) asymmetries in each bank. On average, we find that the Big-4 banks immediately passed on 120 percent of each rate rise but only 85 per cent of each rate cut. Further, when mortgage rates are substantially above the equilibrium path, we find no evidence of a significant attempt to lower lending rates. However, when the mortgage rate is markedly below its equilibrium value, we find that banks eliminate the gap by raising their rates by an average feedback coefficient of between 25 –0.148 per week, with the National Australia Bank (–0.161) and the ANZ (–0.132) being typically the fastest and slowest to respond, respectively. We also find evidence of synchronised rate-setting behavior among these major banks.

Bio:

Andrew Worthington completed his undergraduate study of economics, modern history, politics and business studies at the University of New England (1986-1988) with credit from the University of Technology Sydney (1984) and the University of Sydney (1985) and worked in security analysis and portfolio management in Sydney (1984-1986 and 1988-1991) before embarking upon his academic career in 1993. His career appointments include the University of New England (1993-1996), Queensland University of Technology (1996-2005), the University of Wollongong (2005-2007), and is currently at Griffith University. His areas of expertise include Financial Markets, Financial Institutions, Alternative Investments, Personal Finance, Behavioural Finance.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Governance Gallic Style: Continuity and Change in French Politics

Date: 16 July 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: the French Ambassador to New Zealand, H.E. Francis Etienne

Background:

The French Ambassador to New Zealand, H.E. Francis Etienne will discuss the evolution of the French governance style, historically marked by military influence, centralisation and hierarchical power. Over the recent decades, globalisation and the ongoing construction of the European Union have transformed French politics, integrating the primacy of contracts, subsidiarity or legitimation from the base, while the enduring historical references are still evident .

Ambassador Etienne will reflect on continuity or change, tradition and modernity, nostalgia for the past, and aspiration for a different future.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

She’ll Be Right? Terrorism, Tourism and Turbulence

Date: 10 July 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Cyril Peter, Senior Lecturer, Wellington Institute of Technology

Abstract:

This seminar will examine the preparedness of the hospitality industry to host mega events such as the Rugby World Cup (RWC). Over the past 32 years, there have been 168 attempts by terrorists to derail sporting events. Eight senior managers from local hospitality properties participated in the exploratory research presented in this seminar, which found that the industry had a relaxed management attitude towards security. This will be examined more closely using Gert Hofstede’s low uncertainty avoidance category.

Bio:

Cyril Peter is a Senior Lecturer at the Wellington Institute of Technology (WelTec) with the School of Business and Information Technology, having taught several business management and hospitality management courses over the years.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Beyond the Final Frontier: Latest Developments in Space Law

Date: 5 July 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Dr Chris Newman, University of Sunderland

Background:

Europe’s leading legal expert on Space Law examines a number of issues relating to the legal aspects of exploring Space, both Lower Earth Orbit and beyond. Dr Chris Newman is currently researching issues relating to military exploitation of space, the increasing commercialisation of space, and the potential role of the criminal law in issues relating to space exploration. He has appeared on numerous media outlets in relation to his pioneering work in this field including Radio 4, BBC news, and Sky News. He also has his own blog, The Legal Spaceman, which documents his on-going interests.

Bio:

Dr Newman is currently Senior Lecturer in Law at Sunderland University, UK. He originally worked as both a Detective in the Metropolitan Police Service and subsequently as a Solicitor, working in private practice in the fields of Criminal Law, Human Rights and Family Law. His PhD thesis was based around a comparative analysis of low-level public order (disorderly conduct) provisions in England, USA, Germany and Australia.

Hosted by the School of Government; RSVP not required.

Social Dynamics Influencing the Early Return to Work of Injured Workers in NZ

Date: 4 July 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Station, Level 5, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr John Wren, Principal Research Advisor, ACC Research

Background:

Between 2007 and 2011, ACC funded a Better@Work evidence-based early return to work intervention. The intervention was delivered in partnership between ACC, selected local Primary Health Organisations (PHOs) and GP practices in Taupo, Hawkes Bay and West Auckland.

A key outcome sought from the intervention was the promotion of the early return to work of injured workers as part of their injury treatment and rehabilitation. The intervention focussed upon using a range of economic, process and other motivational influencers to change GP fit-for-work certification behaviour and to enable injured workers early return to work according to their certified capacity.

This talk focuses upon what the evaluators learnt about the social group dynamics that influence early to return to work of injured workers, including the relative importance of a range of motivators of GP behaviour on certifying fitness-for-work.

Dr John Wren is a principal research advisor in the ACC Research Group. He has extensive knowledge and experience in public health and injury prevention research.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

The Future of Music Festivals: Play, Technology, and Glastonbury

Date: 26 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speakers: A/Prof Ian Yeoman & Dr Karen Smith, School of Management

Abstract:

How does technology and play intertwine and what does it mean for the music festival experience? Using the process of trends analysis and scenario planning, this seminar paints a picture of the future using Glastonbury as an example for discussion. It identifies nine steps that have brought about the intertwining of play and technology, and then introduces quantum leaping technologies that could radically enhance the play – technology paradigm for music festival goers. For the festival organiser, the research captures the changes that may occur, how they will enhance the social and cultural capital of festivals, identify how festivals will be consumed and how technology will enhance the authenticity of music. In addition, the presentation discusses the plausibility of futures studies, for example ‘science fiction or science reality’.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Diplomat’s Seminar Series: The Philippines and the United Nations

Date: 21 June 2013

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

Speaker: Her Excellency Virginia H. Benavidez, Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines to New Zealand

Background:

The Global Public Policy Project and the United Nations Association of New Zealand invite you to a series of afternoon lectures on United Nations engagement. The series will explore perspectives on the United Nations system, offered by senior diplomats from nations of all continents.

Environmental Policy-Making in New Zealand, 1981-2014

Date: 21 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway West Wing, Room 501 (Level 5)

Speaker: Gary Taylor (QSO), Executive Director and Chairman of the Environmental Defence Society

Abstract:

This presentation will focus on environmental policy-making in New Zealand during the period spanning the 1980s to the present day, examining how key policy decisions have been made including the major environmental reforms of the late 1980s and the introduction of the Resource Management Act in 1991. It will then trace the changes in environmental policy decision-making since the RMA was enacted, describing the way current RMA reforms are being pursued by government and contrast that approach with more collaborative initiatives in freshwater policy, the future of the Mackenzie Country and new initiatives in Auckland relating to its Unitary Plan, the Hauraki Gulf and transport funding. Gary's commentary will be from the perspective of a participant in environmental decision-making, in his role as an environmental advocate for the Environmental Defence Society.

Bio:

Gary Taylor (MA (Hons), QSO) is the Executive Director and Chairman of the Environmental Defence Society. EDS is a boutique environmental law group that educates, litigates and does innovative thinking about environmental policy and governance. Gary has been an environmental advocate and policy analyst for more than 30 years. He also has extensive experience in the corporate management of organisations, having been the Chairman of the Auckland Area Health Board, the Climate Change and Business Centre (Australia) and the Peoples Centre Health Trust. He has been a director of Watercare Services Ltd, Infrastructure Auckland, Auckland Regional Transport Authority and the Hobsonville Land Company. He has also been a regional and city councillor. Gary brings his extensive experience in environmental policy and corporate governance to his lecture.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Making Wellington the Natural Capital: Cats, Rats and Other Predators

Date: 14 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Nau Mai Room, Ground Floor of Te Puni Kōkiri House, 143 Lambton Quay.

Speaker: Dr Gareth Morgan, CEO of Gareth Morgan Investments

Background:

Gareth Morgan will speak about the controversial Cats to Go campaign, the vision for a Predator Free New Zealand, and how we can all start to make a difference right here in Wellington by working together on 'Enhancing the Halo'.

Bio:

Dr Gareth Morgan is an economist, public policy analyst, portfolio investor, football fan, motorcycle adventurer and philanthropist. Through the Morgan Foundation, Gareth has instigated a series of books and campaigns on issues of public interest. The "Our Far South" set out to raise New Zealanders' awareness of the importance of the area between Stewart Island and the South Pole. This has led on to Gareth's participation in further conservation projects – Predator Free New Zealand, Million Dollar Mouse, Stewart Island Treasure, and New Zealand's Cleanest River.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Idiosyncratic Return Volatility, Earnings Quality, and Firm Age

Date: 14 June 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW128

Speaker: Associate Professor Brian Rountree, Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business, Rice University, Texas

Abstract:

This study links the trend in two earnings quality metrics:

  1. the standard deviation of residuals from the Dechow and Dichev (2002) model
  2. squared residuals from the Jones (1991) model to firm age (defined using data about firm incorporation/founding dates)

The results reveal the significant increasing trends in both measures during the 1962-2006 period are related to the dramatic decrease in firm age coupled with the increasing percentage of market capitalization thatyoung firms had during the period. Given young firms are expected to have greater variation inaccruals, the temporal trends in the measures are not indicative of worse earnings quality over time.We further illustrate after accounting for firm age, there is no association between earnings quality measures and the trend in idiosyncratic return volatility during the sample period. Overall, researchers need to carefully consider the confounding effects of firm age on measures of earnings quality when conducting empirical tests.

Bio:

Brian Rountree earned his PhD in accounting from the University of North Carolina in 2003. He also holds a bachelors degree (summa cum laude) in accounting from Babson College and was valedictorian of his graduating class.

Brian joined the Rice faculty in 2003 and has taught accounting courses across all MBA programs at the Jones School and been the recipient of multiple teaching awards. His research focuses on the influence of external forces on the financial reporting choices and characteristics of firms. Brian's research has been published in top academic journals including The Accounting Review, Journal of Accounting & Economics, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Business, Finance, and Accounting, and the Journal of Financial & Quantitative Analysis.

He serves as an editor at the Journal of Business, Finance, and Accounting and is on the Editorial Advisory and Review Board of The Accounting Review. Brian is an active member of the American Accounting Association, speaking regularly at the annual and mid-year meetings, as well as helping to coordinate the research sessions. He has also presented his research at over 30 international institutions across 7 different countries.

In addition to his academic work, Brian has served on the board of local corporations and actively consults with various organizations about accounting related issues. Prior to joining academia he was a public accountant at Price Waterhouse in Boston, MA.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Personal Data is the New Oil: The Opportunity and Challenge

Date: 13 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Kaliya ('Identity Woman') Hamlin, co-founder of Personal Data Ecosystem Consortium

Abstract:

In this age of "Big Data", how does the current ecosystem of advertising and data tracking work? Does it have to be based on a stalker economy using cookies and building individual profiles? What are the new personal cloud based models that empower individuals to collect, manage and get value from their personal data? Can new markets be fostered that are privacy enhancing? What do citizens want? What can governments do?

Bio:

Kaliya Hamlin is an expert in user-centric identity and data sharing and is widely known as Identity Woman. In 2005 she co-founded the Internet Identity Workshop (with Doc Searls and Phil Windley), five years later she founded the Personal Data Ecosystem Consortium to catalyse a network of companies working to give individuals the tools to collect, manage and gain value from their own personal data generated actively and passively as they interact with all kinds of digital systems.

She was elected in August 2012 to the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) Identity Ecosystem Steering Committee, Management Council as the Consumer Advocate delegate. In 2012 Hamlin was named a Young Global Leader in 2012 by the World Economic Forum (WEF). She sits on the OASIS IDTrust member steering committee and is active in the Federated Social Web, which recently moved its work to the W3C. See also a recent article in CIO magazine.

Co-hosted by the Chair in e-Government and Personal Information Management Ltd. All welcome; please register your interest at e-government@vuw.ac.nz, or phone Lynn Barlow on 04 463 6966

Hedge Funds' Influence on Bond Yields

Date: 13 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Ser-Huang Poon, University of Manchester, UK

Abstract:

By analysing capital flows into and out of the hedge fund industry over the period from 1994 to 2010, we find strong evidence that hedge funds flow can predict credit spread, defined as the difference between Moody’s Baa bond yield and the T-bill rate. We find outflows exert a much stronger influence than inflows. In particular, outflows from debt funds increase credit spread. Outflows from large funds on the other hand reduce credit spread. These findings are consistent with the explanation that bond funds hold a large proportion of high yield corporate bonds, and must liquidate at least some of them when facing liquidity constraint. Large size funds, however, have a large pool of high grade liquid bonds and use them to manage fund liquidity instead.

Beta exposure to credit spread, performance fees, notice period and leverage can all help to predict the effect of funds flows on credit spread. But the fund strategy is the most important determinant, explaining up to 42% of the credit spread variations comparing to the 15% adjust R^2 at the base line level. Our research is a first step to identifying systematically important hedge fund.

Bio:

Dr Ser-Huang Poon graduated from the National University of Singapore with a degree in Accountancy, and obtained her Masters degree in Accounting and Finance and PhD degree in Finance from Lancaster University. She is currently a Professor of Finance at Manchester Business School, visiting professor at the National University of Singapore and was recently appointed as a distinguished visiting professor at the University of Technology, Sydney.  She is also a Member of the Numerical Algorithms Group (NAG).

Dr Poon has been contributed to doctoral training programming in the UK and Europe over a long period. In 2002, she setup the first ESRC funded UK wide Advanced Doctoral Training Programme in Finance and set up MSc Quantitative Finance and Financial Engineering and MSc Mathematical Finance at Manchester Business School in collaboration with the School of Mathematics in 2004. She managed the European framework 6 doctoral training program at Manchester.  In 2008, she successfully led a European consortium of university and industry partners on a 3.7 million euro bid for research training in the theme of Risk Management and Risk Reporting, with £929,023 Manchester based funding.  In 2012, she is part of another consortium that looks into the use of high performance computing in Finance with £220,400 direct funding with a specific focus on computer platform comparison and evaluation for the purpose of real-time risk management.

Dr Poon is internationally renowned for her volatility research which was cited as reference readings on Nobel website. More recently, her interests have extended to derivatives and credit risk, liquidity and quantitative aspects of risk management.  She has written three books and published widely in peer reviewed journals.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Interactive Media and Public Engagement: Some Scandinavian Experiences

Date: 12 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: A/Prof Karl Löfgren, School of Government

Abstract:

We have in recent years witnessed an upsurge in innovative use of new social media and other forms of interactive media within the realm of governments. While we can discuss the actual value of social media for public engagement, no one can doubt that they matter. So far the experiences most examples are derived from are North American.

Karl Löfgren will present innovative examples of successful use of new information and communication technologies in public engagement from some of the Scandinavian countries, based on both his own research and research from other scholars. However, he will also comment on the risks, threats and challenges that may come with the use of new interactive media.

Bio:

Dr Löfgren is an Associate Professor in the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington. Before taking up his position with VUW he was Associate Professor with Roskilde University in Denmark. For the past 15 years he has been involved in various Scandinavian and European research projects on public policy and governance of ICT, the regulation and governance of privacy in the advent of new ICTs, new institutional models of democracy and networked governance, and public sector reforms.

Co-hosted by the Chair in e-Government and the Department of Internal Affairs. All welcome; please register your interest at e-government@vuw.ac.nz, or phone Lynn Barlow on 04 463 6966

Considering the Counterfactual in Predation Cases

Date: 12 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Kay E. Winkler, PhD Student, Victoria Business School

Abstract:

In order to distinguish predatory pricing from competition on the merits, the courts in the United States and in the European Union have established cost-based tests. In contrast, Australia and New Zealand make use of a counterfactual analysis – which has proved controversial when applied in New Zealand case law. The new European effects-based approach advocated by the European Commission entails a counterfactual analysis which is related to the profitability of the conduct. In this presentation it is suggested that such a counterfactual test could be useful in predation cases if it establishes a causal link between the profitability of the conduct and the foreclosure effect.

Bio:

Kay E. Winkler is a PhD student at Victoria Business School. His research interests cover law and economics, competition policy and regulation. In Germany, he previously worked as in-house lawyer for competition law and telecommunications regulation, and as lecturer for international business law.

Hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation. Tea and coffee will be provided from midday, seminar to commence at 12.30pm. This is a free seminar, but RSVP to iscr@vuw.ac.nz if you would like to attend.

Appeal for a New Zealand Risk Assessment

Date: 10 June 2013

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speakers: Emeritus Professor Sir Alan Mark; Associate Professor Ralph Chapman; Dr Russell Tregonning; Louis Chambers

Background:

In early March 2013, 100 distinguished New Zealanders launched an appeal for the New Zealand Parliament to undertake a national risk assessment. Such an assessment, it was argued, should explore the country’s economic security, energy and climate change security, the risk exposure of business and ecological security. This seminar will provide an opportunity to discuss the logic for a national risk assessment and what it might achieve.

Bios:

Emeritus Professor Sir Alan Mark is one of New Zealand's leading plant ecologists, specialising in the ecology of indigenous ecology of tussock grasslands, alpine lands, wetlands, shrublands, forests and lakeshores. He played a crucial role in opposing the raising of Lake Manapouri in the late 1960s and subsequently was the first Chairperson of the Guardians of Lakes Manapouri and Te Anau. Sir Alan was made a fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand in 1987 and was a member of National Parks and Reserves Authority and later the NZ Conservation Authority. Now retired, he is still actively involved in conservation. He was made a knight for his conservation work in 2010.

Associate Professor Ralph Chapman is the Director of the Environmental Studies Programme in the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences at Victoria University of Wellington. Prior to his appointment at Victoria University he was a senior official in the Ministry for the Environment. He has published widely on a range of environmental and energy policy issues, not least climate change.

Dr Russell Tregonning is an Orthopaedic Surgeon at Bowen Hospital Wellington and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at the University of Otago School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wellington. He is the Past President of the NZ Orthopaedic Association and current executive member of OraTaiao: The NZ Climate and Health Council.

Louis Chambers graduated from the University of Otago in 2012 with an LLB (First Class Hons) and a BA (Economics, Environmental Management). He has been awarded a Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford University later in 2013. Louis helped to co-found Generation Zero in 2011 and is currently working full time on climate change for Generation Zero.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Safe at Home, Safe at Work: Domestic Violence and the Workplace

Date: 10 June 2013

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12, Boardroom

Speaker: Ludo McFerran, Project Manager of 'Safe at Home, Safe at Work' for the Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse, University of New South Wales

Abstract:

Between February and July 2011, the Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse (ADFVC) at the University of New South Wales conducted a national online domestic violence and the workplace survey. The survey on the impact of domestic violence at work was completed by over 3600 union members. A full copy of the report is available at www.dvandwork.unsw.edu.au.

In her presentation, Ludo McFerran will discuss the findings of the research project, the international programmes to which it has contributed, and related research happening elsewhere.

Bio:

Ludo McFerran has worked in the field of domestic violence prevention since the 1970s. She has chaired the Australian national peak body and was instrumental in introducing new policies to support those experiencing domestic violence to stay safely in their homes. She has worked at the Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse for the past five years, working on violence and homelessness for older women and currently managing the national project on domestic violence and work.

Hosted by the Industrial Relations Centre as part of their 2013 Lunchtime Seminar Series in collaboration with the School of Management. Tea and coffee will be available and you are welcome to bring your lunch; RSVP to IRC Manager Sue Ryall to assist with venue arrangements.

Health Status and Retirement Intentions of Older NZ Nurses

Date: 6 June 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Léonie Walker, Principal Researcher, New Zealand Organisation of Nurses / Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Nursing and Midwifery, Victoria University

Abstract:

This seminar will present results from a recent study of Late Career Nurses; in particular their health (as evaluated by the EQ-5D and qualitative analysis of free text comments), the impact of shift work, and their retirement intentions. All have profound importance for nursing workforce planning in New Zealand, as our nursing workforce, in tandem with our population, is rapidly ageing.

Bio:

Dr Léonie Walker has a PhD in Immunology and a diverse employment history as an academic researcher, Principle Scientific Officer in applied Immunology in a hospital setting, and a role in NHS health research management with direct project work on public health topics ranging from HIV to obesity and diabetes. She was involved in the establishment of the North East England Diabetes Research Network, based within the Clinical Research Facility at the University of Newcastle, and a management role overseeing the specialist diabetes research nursing team. In 2008 Léonie moved to New Zealand to take up the position of researcher with the New Zealand Organisation of Nurses, where she has been working on nursing workforce issues ever since.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Education and Poverty: Confronting the Evidence

Date: 31 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Buliding, Level 5, Room 501

Speaker: Professor Helen Ladd, Edgar Thompson Professor of Public Policy Studies and Professor of Economics at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy

Abstract:

Current US policy initiatives to improve their education system, including No Child Left Behind, test-based evaluation of teachers, and the promotion of competition are misguided because they either deny or set to the side a basic body of evidence documenting that students from disadvantaged households on average perform less well in school than those from more advantaged families.

Because these policy initiatives do not directly address the educational challenges experienced by disadvantaged students, they have contributed little -- and are not likely to contribute much in the future -- to raising overall student achievement or to reducing achievement and educational attainment gaps between advantaged and disadvantaged students. Moreover, such policies have the potential to do serious harm. Addressing the educational challenges faced by children from disadvantaged families will require a broader and bolder approach to education policy than the recent efforts to reform schools.

Bio:

Helen F. Ladd is the Edgar Thompson Professor of Public Policy Studies and Professor of Economics at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy. Most of her current research focuses on education policy. She is particularly interested in various aspects school accountability, education finance, teacher labor markets, and school choice. She has written numerous articles on charter schools and other forms of choice in North Carolina, self-governing schools and parental choice in New Zealand, market-based reforms in urban school districts, voucher programs, school reform in post-Apartheid South Africa, and school finance in the Netherlands.

With the support of two Fulbright grants, she spent the spring term of 1998 in New Zealand studying this country's education system and the spring term of 2002 doing similar research in South Africa. Most recently, she spent six months as a visiting researcher at the University of Amsterdam examining the Netherlands' long experience with parental choice, significant autonomy for individual schools, and weighted student funding. She is the author of many books and articles, including a co-authored book on New Zealand educational reforms of the late 1980s and early 1990s, When Schools Compete: A Cautionary Tale (Brookings, 2000).

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

The World Economic Crisis - America's Role

Date: 24 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Floor RHMZ05

Speaker: Dr Christopher Korth, Professor of Finance and International Business in the Department of Finance and Commercial Law, Haworth College of Business, Western Michigan University

Abstract:

The world economy remains mired in a persistent, long-run and complicated crisis. One of the most devastating causes was the near-collapse of the American financial-markets in the 2007-2009 period. This presentation will examine the causes, the effects, the responses of the major players and the outlook of this crisis for the American and world economies. The foundation for the crisis was many-faceted: excessive deregulation, inadequate enforcement of existing regulations, market ideologies and market innovations. All players in the markets shared some of the responsibility -- the government policymakers, the national regulators, the market makers and speculators on Wall Street -- and even the public.

  • Who was primarily responsible?
  • How have the players, especially the policymakers and Wall Street responded?
  • What have we learned?
  • Where do things stand now?

Bio:

Professor Christopher Korth received his doctorate in International Business and Finance from Indiana University (1969) and joined the Western Michigan University faculty in 1994. Previous to his current positon, he spent 17 years at the University of South Carolina, where he was Professor of International Business and Finance and Director of the Faculty Development in International Business (FDIB) Program. From 1973-1977, he was the Chief International Economist with the First National Bank of Chicago.

Dr Korth is the author of International Business: Environment and Management (Prentice-Hall) and International Countertrade (Quorum Books). He has authored articles which have appeared in many management and scholarly journals on such topics as the management of foreign exchange risk, international banking, the country risk of international loans and investments, countertrade, the impact of foreign investments upon host countries, American depository receipts, the prospects for East West trade, and the causes of managerial failures for exporting and investing abroad. His latest book is Sensible Tax Reform: Fair, Simple and Effective, which will be published next year.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Asset Revaluations, Price Gouging, and Barriers to Entry

Date: 24 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Dr Geoff Bertram, Senior Associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Abstract:

The recent Labour-Greens policy announcement on electricity sector regulation has highlighted several areas of market failure. This paper reviews financial data from the accounts of the generator-retailers, and some simple economic theory, to demonstrate the scale of excess profit-taking relative to the policy benchmarks and general expectations of company conduct that were set at the time when the generation assets of the former ECNZ were divested. Some suggestions are offered for rethinking the policy framework for the sector.

Bio:

Dr Bertram is a Senior Associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. Previously a Senior Lecturer in Economics at Victoria, his research interests include regulation of public utility industries such as electricity, gas and telecommunications; economic and political development of small island societies with a particular focus on the Pacific; the design of policies to address climate change; and the long-run evolution of the New Zealand economy. 

He has over 100 publications including more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles, books, and book chapters. He served on the Council of the International Association for Energy Economics from 2005 to 2007 and convened the Association’s annual conference in Wellington in 2007.  He has been a member of the editorial boards of a number of international journals including World Development 1992-97, Environment and Development Economics 1996-2006, and Asia Pacific Viewpoint since 1976, and speaks regularly at international conferences on energy, climate change and small-island issues.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Enhancing Strategic Policy Capability in the Public Sector: Case Studies from Australia

Date: 22 May 2013

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3

How is the challenge of enhancing strategic policy capability being met across the Tasman, and how does it compare with what is happening in New Zealand?

Background:

The seminar is part of an ANZSOG-funded research project on enhancing strategic policy capability, and is an opportunity to discuss specific initiatives with visiting practitioners from the Commonwealth, ACT and Queensland governments.

Professor Mark Evans, Director of the ANZSOG Institute for Governance at the University of Canberra, and Professor Claudia Scott, Professor of Public Policy (School of Government and ANZSOG), are collaborating on the project, which focuses on identifying and comparing different approaches to building strategic policy capability in New Zealand and selected jurisdictions in Australia.

RSVP to: judy.beswick@vuw.ac.nz

 

Time Banking: What Can It Contribute To Social Policy?

Date: 21 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Ruth Naughton-­Doe, University of Bristol, UK

Abstract:

Communities, researchers and policy makers worldwide are seeking solutions for the increasing numbers of economically marginalised people. Community currencies, including time banks, are one solution to this problem. Time banks facilitate the exchange of skills and services through the currency of time. In the UK, time banks have been included in recent government Health and Social Care strategy. However, away from the rhetoric of success, how are time banks working in practice to meet the needs of individuals and the community? This presentation discusses preliminary research findings from the United Kingdom and New Zealand.

Bio:

Ruth Naughton-Doe is evaluating time banking in the United Kingdom for her PhD at the School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, United Kingdom. She is currently visiting the University of Auckland on a World Universities Network funded scholarship to explore time banking in New Zealand. She co-founded and co-chairs the Time Bank Research Network. Ruth can be contacted at: ruth.naughton-doe@bristol.ac.uk

This Community and Voluntary Sector Research Seminar is hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law and the School of Management; all welcome. Any queries please contact karen.smith@vuw.ac.nz, or phone 04 463 5721.

 

Service Quality Measurement in a Service Desk Environment

Date: 20 May 2013

Time: 11.20 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3


Victoria Business School International Scholar Programme, in association with the School of Information Management, presents a seminar by Professor Sue Conger, Director of IT and IT Service Management Programs, University of Dallas

Abstract:

A service is one or more organizational capabilities delivered through processes to provide an experience of value to a user through deeds, performances, or actions. Ultimately, service quality is the extent to which the service is satisfactory in providing successful completion to a desired need, which may be a problem, information request, or other desire. Service quality is evidenced in outcomes beyond an individual’s perception, including customer satisfaction, word of mouth, intentions to continue using the service, and participation in social networking sites.

Organizations seek to measure their quality of services as a basis for improvements. Based on an extensive review of academic and professional research we have developed a service desk survey that includes new measures for medium quality, information quality, medium, and context. This talk introduces issues relating to measurement of service quality beyond those of SERVQUAL, Help Desk International, and basic customer satisfaction.

This seminar will also present the results of the study with data analysis currently available. Results to date support the notion that perceived service value is by far the most important factor in perceived service quality with outcome success (in meeting the needed goal) second in important. But, the medium used matters as to how quality is perceived. Other data analysis is continuing and promises positive results.

Bio:

Professor Conger has a PhD in Computer Information Systems from the Stern School of Management at New York University. She is the author of The New Software Engineering, Planning and Designing Effective Web Sites, and Process Mapping & Management, and has begun a book on IT Service Management. She is currently on the faculty of University of Dallas, where she manages both Information Technology and IT Service Management (ITSM) programs.

Professor Conger is the Vice President of Special Interest Groups and Chapters for the Association of Information Systems (AIS), President of special interest group on IT Services (AIS SIGSVC), serves on the national Academic Executive Committee for the ITSMF-USA (a practitioner organization), manages the ITSMF-USA Research Subcommittee, and hosts the ITSMF-USA Academic Forum. She is on five editorial boards and the program and planning committees for several conferences.

Hosted by the School of Information Management; no RSVP required.

 

Health Co-Morbidity Effects on ACC Injury Treatment and Rehabilitation Utilisation and Costs

Date: 16 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr John Wren, principal research advisor in the New Zealand Accident Compensation Commission research group

Background:

What is the evidence for health co-morbidity effects on ACC injury treatment and rehabilitation utilisation, workers compensation costs, and an aging population to 2025? In this study of a random sample of 337,665 people continuously registered over a three year period with a range of primary care practices in New Zealand from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2011:

  • the presence of a health co-morbidity was found to have a strong statistically significant association with increased service utilisation and costs independent of, and additional to, normal health cost effects typically associated with age, gender, ethnicity and socio-economic status
  • those with one or more health co-morbidities when compared to those without evidence of a health co-morbidity, were found to be statistically significantly associated with:
    • making 28% more claims
    • receiving lump sum payments that are 346% higher
    • having medical treatment costs that are 59% higher
    • paid 39% more weekly compensation, and
    • overall, incur 59% more total ACC costs across all cost categories

It is estimated that 10.7% of Total ACC expenditure in any one year can be directly attributed to the presence of the most common co-morbidities in the population examined in this study. Based on aggregate total cost data in the 2011 ACC Annual Report, the amount of additional payment to claimants that can be directly attributable to the current presence of health co-morbidities in the population is $276M.

This study is the first to produce New Zealand specific evidence for such effects. The presentation will include placing the information within an international context for such effects.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre

How To Get From Avalon To Berhampore: Commuting and Car Ownership Decisions in Wellington

Date: 15 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Dr Toby Daglish, Research Director, NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation

Abstract:

Commuting decisions have major implications for government departments, city and regional councils, car dealers, petrol stations, and household pocket books. We use the NZ Household Travel Survey to explore the decisions made by households in Wellington regarding commuting mode (busing, training, driving, cycling or walking) and intensity of car ownership.

Who are the people sitting bumper to bumper on the motorway, and who are the coves in sneakers walking down the hills each morning? What motivates them to make the choices they choose? We also look at the reverse side of the coin: what does all this coming and going mean for house prices?

Bio:

Dr Toby Daglish is the ISCR Research Director. He holds a PhD in finance from the University of Toronto, and a BSc(hons) from the University of Canterbury, in mathematics. His research interests cover derivative pricing, fixed income securities and portfolio theory.

Hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation. Tea and coffee will be provided from midday, seminar to commence at 12.30pm. This is a free seminar, but RSVP to Tracy.Warbrick@vuw.ac.nz or phone (04) 463-5562.

Wellington’s Earthquake Preparedness - A Tourism Perspective

Date: 15 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: David Perks, CEO, Positively Wellington Tourism

Background:

The Christchurch earthquakes in 2011 posed a great number of challenges for the tourism industry in Canterbury – short term as well as long term. David Perks will be talking about what the main visitor-related challenges in case of a potential destructive earthquake in Wellington would be. After having seen the implications in Christchurch, how is the Wellington tourism industry cooperating, and what plans or strategies are in place to cope with possible effects?

Bio:

David Perks spent 16 years in the hotel sector, before joining PWT. Alongside his position as CEO, Positively Wellington Tourism, David is Chair of Regional Tourism Organisations NZ (RTONZ) and also sits on the Board of the Tourism Industry Association of New Zealand, Conventions Incentives New Zealand, Arts Wellington, the Hertz Sevens and i-SITE NZ.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar; all events are free and unreserved.

Biased Impact of Foreclosures on Housing Prices: Evidence from a Downward Spiraling Market

Date: 3 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: J. Stanley Mackin Distinguished Professor Steven Swidler, Auburn University, Alabama, US.

Abstract:

This paper contributes to the literature focusing on the impact of foreclosure status on single family house prices during a housing market collapse when foreclosures and distressed sales become the majority of recorded transactions. While it is generally possible to identify Real-estate owned (REO) transactions in publicly available data, other forms of distressed sales such as short sales are generally not identified. In a healthy market where both foreclosures and distressed sales are a small fraction of the transactions, omitting these observations from the analyzed sample likely introduces minor sample selection bias. However, when distressed sales become commonplace, failing to identify them introduces an omitted variable bias. We propose a matching methodology to create proxies for distressed and arms-length sales. We show that during the market collapse in Las Vegas (NV) from 2008q1 through 2011q2, the price impact associated with foreclosure status converged to that associated with distressed (short) sales.

Bio:

Professor Steve Swidler has published articles in derivatives, financial engineering, investments, and financial institutions, and his work has appeared in a number of academic journals including the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking and the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis. Prior to joining the faculty at Auburn, Professor Swidler taught at the University of Texas at Arlington, Southern Methodist University, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Rice University. He has also had summer appointments at Victoria University and the Oslo School of Business.

Professor Swidler is the recipient of the W. Paul Green Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching, as well as a number of university research awards. In addition to his academic experience, Professor Swidler has worked at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and at Lexecon, an economic consulting group. He has been asked to give finance seminars to business leaders, bank executives and government officials around the world. Professor Swidler is a member of the Financial Management Association and the American Finance Association.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Strategy-Proofness makes the Difference: Deferred-Acceptance with Responsive Priorities

Date: 2 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Bettina Klaus, Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics (HEC), University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Abstract:

In college admissions and student placements at public schools, the admission decision can be thought of as assigning indivisible objects with capacity constraints to a set of students such that each student receives at most one object and monetary compensations are not allowed. In these important market design problems, the agent-proposing deferred-acceptance (DA-) mechanism with responsive strict priorities performs well and economists have successfully implemented DA-mechanisms or slight variants thereof.

We show that almost all real-life mechanisms used in such environments including the large classes of priority mechanisms and linear programming mechanisms satisfy a set of simple and intuitive properties. Once we add strategy-proofness to these properties, DA-mechanisms are the only ones surviving. In market design problems that are based on weak priorities (like school choice), generally multiple tie-breaking (MTB) procedures are used and then a mechanism is implemented with the obtained strict priorities. By adding stability with respect to the weak priorities, we establish the rst normative foundation for MTB-DA-mechanisms that are used in NYC.

Bio:

Professor Klaus has been at the Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics (HEC), University of Lausanne since 2009. Her research interests include:

  • Game Theory
  • Market Design
  • Social Choice Theory

She is currently working on fair allocation and matching problems, in particular on fair division, house allocation and assignment models, two-sided matching and student placement, and one-sided matching (roommate markets), coalition and network formation.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Future of i-SITE Visitor Information Centres

Date: 1 May 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Paul Yeo, i-SITE Executive Manager, Tourism New Zealand

Abstract:

New Zealand’s official information centre network, managed by Tourism New Zealand in partnership with the industry, is impacted by a changing market and recent governmental developments. Paul will be talking about i-SITE New Zealand’s role within the industry, current market trends such as awareness amongst visitors, their reasons for using i-SITEs and the impact of i-SITEs on the decision to use an activity, accommodation or transport provider and will outline current and future marketing activities that will show how i-SITEs respond to current trends and changes within New Zealand’s tourism industry.

Bio:

Paul oversees Tourism New Zealand's industry relationships and quality services covering Qualmark, the i-SITE Visitor Information Network and the China Market Development Unit, which monitors the quality of services provided to the Chinese ADS (Approved Destination Status) group tour market. He chairs the board of Qualmark Ltd and is the Executive Manager for the Visitor Information Network Inc. Paul has over 30 years of experience in the tourism industry.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Meddling with the New Zealand Model: The Challenge of Measuring Performance in Pacific Island Countries

Date: 1 May 2013

Time: 11.30 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Desmond Amosa, adviser for the Pacific Islands Centre of Public Administration (PICPA) at the University of the South Pacific

Background:

Dr Desmond Uelese Amosa is a graduate of the School of Government at Victoria University and currently working as an adviser for the Pacific Islands Centre of Public Administration (PICPA) at the University of the South Pacific. Prior to joining PICPA, he was the Dean of the Faculty of Business and Entrepreneurship at the National University of Samoa (NUS) and a senior lecturer with the School of Management and Public Administration at the University of the South Pacific. He also worked as a senior officer at the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service Commission in Samoa.

Dr Amosa's main areas of interest in teaching and research are public policy and management, administrative ethics and public sector reform. He has published several journal articles on public sector reforms in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga, and recent publications include Social Policies in Samoa, published in 2012 by the Commonwealth Secretariat and the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD) and "Are Fiji’s Government Commercial Companies in Competent Hands?", published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration, 33(2).

Hosted by the School of Government; RSVP not required.

Social Capital in Post-Disaster Recovery

Date: 19 April 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Daniel Aldrich, Purdue University, Fulbright Research Fellow at University of Tokyo, Japan

Abstract:

Using micro- and neighborhood-level data from four disasters in three nations over the 20th and 21st centuries, this talk will investigate standard theories of recovery and resilience. Bivariate, time series cross sectional, and matching analyses show that more than factors such as individual or personal wealth, aid from the government, or damage from the disaster, the strength of social capital best predicts the ability of local communities to reform. Social capital works through three main mechanisms: elevating voice and suppressing exit, overcoming collective action barriers, and providing informal insurance. Should social networks prove the critical engines before, during, and after disaster, this suggests a new approach to disaster mitigation for NGOs, individuals, and governments.

Bio:

Daniel P. Aldrich is an Associate Professor of political science at Purdue University and currently a Fulbright fellow at the University of Tokyo. He was an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellow at USAID (2011-2012) and a Visiting Scholar at the University of Tokyo’s Law Faculty in Japan during the 2007-2008 academic year. During 2006-2007, he was an Advanced Research Fellow at Harvard University’s Program on US-Japan Relations. 

Dr Aldrich received his PhD and MA in political science from Harvard University, an MA from the University of California at Berkeley, and his BA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has published a number of peer-reviewed articles alongside research for general audiences. His research has been funded by grants from the Abe Foundation, IIE Fulbright Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Reischauer Institute at Harvard University, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and Harvard’s Center for European Studies.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Financial Vulnerability and Capacities in Amateur Sports Clubs

Date: 19 April 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Carolyn Cordery, Senior Lecturer at the School of Accounting and Commercial Law

Abstract:

Financial vulnerability is a critical issue for nonprofit sports clubs due to clubs’ increasing costs and impediments to generating sufficient income. In our 2012 paper, we derived a conceptual understanding of financial vulnerability for amateur sports clubs by assessing three financial vulnerability models, two of which have previously been applied in the nonprofit sector generally. Two models are based on revenue patterns and expenditure, and the third is based on movements in net assets over four years. The preferred model was used to identify determinants of financial vulnerability within amateur sports clubs, focusing specifically on golf and football.

In response to financial vulnerability, some amateur sports clubs cut their expenditure to meet cash resources, preferring to reduce dependence on external resource-providers; others reduce vulnerability to environmental fluctuations by seeking new sources of funding (Miller et al., 2002). Nevertheless, financial capacity does not of itself ensure sustainability. In order to develop financial, human resource and structural capacity, sports organisations depend on funders (including participants’ subscriptions), volunteers, staff and supporters as well as physical resource providers (Hall et al., 2003). The building of capacity through increased resource dependence is a common tactic across the nonprofit sector, yet analysis of the interdependencies between different capacities is rare.

The second phase of this research examined capacities in the golf and football clubs which were at the 'financially vulnerable' end of the spectrum. Some capacities in these clubs were observably weaker than in financially healthy clubs (using the schema developed by Cordery et al., 2012). We also analysed the inter-dependencies between different capacities using both subjective and objective measures. The findings are important because clubs that are financially vulnerable must build capacity if they are to survive and thrive. Further, identifying the capacities that affect or are impacted by clubs’ financial health should also improve the teaching and practice of sports management. This research was funded by Sport New Zealand. The 2012 journal article is available as below; the conference paper which is the main focus of this presentation will be made available separately.

Cordery, C. J., Sim, D., & Baskerville, R. F. (2012). Three models, one goal: Assessing financial vulnerability in New Zealand amateur sports clubs. Sport Management Review, 14. doi:10.1016/j.smr.2012.08.002

Bio:

Dr Cordery's research interests are focused on: Not for profit accounting and accountability, incorporating financial and non-financial reporting, regulation, and governance. She is part of the Volunteer Management Research Programme. Her teaching areas include accounting information systems and audit at undergraduate and postgraduate level. Dr Cordery is a member of the New Zealand Accounting Standards Board.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be followed by morning tea at 10.30 am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Managing Financial Crises: Lean or Clean?

Date: 12 April 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Takayuki Tsuruga, Kyoto University, Japan

Abstract:

This paper discusses the lean vs. clean policy debate in managing financial crises based on dynamic general equilibrium models with an occasionally binding collateral constraint. We show that a full state-contingent subsidy for debtors can restore the first-best allocations by forestalling disorderly deleveraging in a crisis. While this result appears to favor the clean policy against a lean policy that achieves the second-best allocation, further assessment points to various risks associated with the clean policy from a practical viewpoint. First, the optimal clean policy is likely to call for an unrealistically large amount of fiscal resources. Second, if the clean policy is activated with an empirically realistic intervention, the less-than-optimal clean policy incentivizes debtors to take on undue risks, exposing the economy to higher crisis probabilities. Finally, the less-than-optimal clean policy may give rise to huge welfare losses due to the policy maker’s misrecognition of the state of the economy.

Bio:

Dr Tsuruga gained his PhD at Ohio State University in 2005, and is currently Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Economics at Kyoto University. His areas of research specialisation include

  • Monetary Economics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Applied Time Series Econometrics

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Work-Life Balance in New Zealand: The Deserving and the Others

Date: 12 April 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Annick Masselot, Marie Curie Fellow at Canterbury University

Abstract:

Rising female employment rates, changes in family structures and falling fertility rates are amongst the factors contributing to tensions between family and work responsibilities. In the quest for work and family reconciliation, many contemporary societies continue to face a plethora of challenges and what Crompton referred to as ‘the tensions between the demands of capitalist employment and the requirement for care’ (Crompton 2006: 60) are yet to be resolved.

New Zealand’s approach to work-life balance is somewhat unique because it is claimed to neither be about women, nor about families (Department of Labour 2009). However, a critical legal analysis reveals that New Zealand’s approaches to family and workplace challenges is underpinned by patriarchal values favouring traditional family compositions and gender roles. Work-life balance policies and recent welfare reforms have created a two tiered society with some deserving access to work-life balance and others, less deserving.

This paper explores the legal principles required for adequate work-life balance and their implications for the New Zealand legal order.

Bio:

Annick Masselot lectured at Strathclyde University in Glasgow Scotland (1996-2000) and was a researcher at Tilburg University in the Netherlands (2000-2002). From 2000 to 2006, she was co-ordinating the European Commission’s Network of legal experts on the application of Community law on equal treatment between women and men. In 2002, Annick was appointed at the University of Leeds where she is a senior lecturer in European law. She is the deputy director of the Centre for the Study of Law and Policy in Europe (University of Leeds).

Annick has been successful in securing a number of funded projects, in particular with the European Commission. Her research interests focus upon gender equality and equal treatment, social law, reconciliation between work and family life, pregnancy and maternity rights. In 2006, Annick was granted a Marie Curie Fellowship (2007-2010) to study the relationship between scientific excellence, human mobility and gender equality in the context of the European Union and the New Zealand scientific markets. Her project considers the tension present in the development of measures to secure the recruitment and retention of highly skilled women through the promotion of family-friendly policies on the one hand and the increasing relationship between career progression and mobility on the other. The research project is based at the National Centre for the Research on Europe at the University of Canterbury.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be followed by morning tea at 10.30 am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Safe Assets, Liquidity and Monetary Policy

Date: 10 April 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, RHMZ05 (amended venue)

Speaker: Dr Pierpaolo Benigno, Professor of Economics at LUISS, Rome

Abstract:

Monetary policy is examined in models in which safe and pseudo-safe assets coexist. A liquidity shock, worsening the quality of the pseudo-safe assets, raises credit spreads and has negative effects on prices and real activity, unless the central-bank balance sheet is expanded appropriately. Lowering the interest rate on reserves can improve the risk sharing between borrowers and savers.

Bio:

Pierpaolo Benigno graduated from the Bocconi University of Milan, Italy in 1995, and earned his MA (1995) and PhD (2000) from Princeton University. He was Assistant Professor of Economics at New York University (2000-2007), and is now Professor of Economics at LUISS Guido Carli, Rome.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

VSA Contribution to Tourism Development in Vanuatu: "Turism Blong Yumi Evriwan"

Date: 10 April 2013

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Andrew Johnston, VSA Programme Officer for Vanuatu and Solomon Islands

Abstract:

The tourism industry in Vanuatu employs thousands of people and its impact is pervasive throughout all sectors of Vanuatu society. However, the profits of tourism are not distributed evenly throughout Vanuatu geographically or socially. Since 2009, Volunteer Service Abroad (VSA) has sent an intensive deployment of volunteers working with the Vanuatu Department of Tourism, to develop sustainable and locally owned and operated tourism products. This case study explores the impact of this work within the broader context of tourism development in Vanuatu. VSA staff developed this research working alongside volunteers to interview stakeholders, bungalow operators, tour providers, trainers and department of tourism staff to provide an exploration of the impact of six volunteers across four provinces during the last three years.

Bio:

Andrew Johnston is the VSA Programme Officer for Vanuatu and Solomon Islands. Andrew has worked, studied and volunteered in the field of international development for the last ten years, as a volunteer in Zambia, Fiji, and South Africa and in the programmes and fundraising units of development organizations VSA and Christina World Service.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Dreaming of Flying While Grounded: Identity Narratives of Laid Off Pilots

Date: 3 April 2013

Time: 4.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

Speaker: Dr Yiannis Gabriel, Professor of Organizational Theory, University of Bath

A seminar that will be of interest to those who work with professionals, work in Human Resources and organisational change or who are interested in the issues of work and identity.

Overview:

Prof. Gabriel has researched casualisation and its effects on the piloting profession. This presentation will examine the impact of unemployment on the ways professionals construct their identities, by examining a group of airline pilots who have been laid-off (‘furloughed’) twice as a result of the far-ranging changes undergone by the US aviation industry since 9/11. Using a narrative methodology, the presentation will discuss two responses. One, the ‘moving on’ narrative, expresses the subject positions of pilots who had retrained and developed their careers in new areas while the other - the ‘stuck’ narrative - describes the position of those pilots who waited to be recalled and found it impossible to reinvent themselves in new careers. Both groups identified deeply with their profession and, ambivalently, with their company. Two interesting aspects of pilots’ identities will be explored. First, how they are anchored in a powerful childhood dream of flying, and second, how they are challenged when their careers suffer.

About the presenter:

Professor Yiannis Gabriel has a PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Yiannis is known for his work into organizational storytelling and narratives, leadership, psychoanalytic theory, management learning and the culture and politics of contemporary consumption. He has used stories as a way of studying numerous social and organizational phenomena including leader-follower relations, group dynamics and fantasies, nostalgia, insults and apologies. He is the author of nine books, including Organizations in Depth (1999), Storytelling in Organizations (2000) and The Unmanageable Consumer (with Tim Lang) (2006). He has been editor of Management Learning and associate editor of Human Relations and is currently Senior Editor of Organization Studies. His enduring fascination as a researcher lies in what he describes as the unmanageable qualities of life in and out of organizations.

Hosted by the Industrial Relations Centre as part of their 2013 Work and Employment Seminar Series in collaboration with the School of Management. RSVP by Thursday March 28 to irc-events@vuw.ac.nz.

The Moral Standing of Leaders – What Do Followers Expect?

Date: 3 April 2013

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

Speaker: Dr Yiannis Gabriel, Professor of Organizational Theory, University of Bath

Abstract:

"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves." - Lao Tzu

This presentation will interrogate the moral standing of leaders not from any particular philosophical or political vantage point, but rather from that of the followers. Followers expect leaders to be competent (just as they expect professionals and others), but they also expect leaders to provide moral leadership. Followers frequently judge leaders by standards of morality that are considerably harsher than those by which they judge other people; they may also forgive leaders of sins that they would not forgive in others. As a result, leaders are often cast in black and white terms as either saints or devils.

The presentation will argue that criteria used to judge leaders are rooted in fantasy and myth as well as early life experiences. It will conclude by linking the moral standing of leadership to the ethics of care and by the leaders’ perceived ability and willingness to care for their followers. This creates a fundamental dilemma – should the leader treat all followers equally or each according to his/her need?

Bio:

Yiannis Gabriel is Professor of Organizational Theory at the University of Bath. He has a PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Yiannis is known for his work into organizational storytelling and narratives, leadership, psychoanalytic theory, management learning and the culture and politics of contemporary consumption. He has used stories as a way of studying numerous social and organizational phenomena including leader-follower relations, group dynamics and fantasies, nostalgia, insults and apologies. He is the author of nine books, including Organizations in Depth, Storytelling in Organizations and The Unmanageable Consumer (with Tim Lang). He has been editor of Management Learning and associate editor of Human Relations, and is currently Senior Editor of Organization Studies. His enduring fascination as a researcher lies in what he describes as the unmanageable qualities of life in and out of organizations.

Hosted by the School of Management. All welcome; no RSVPs required.

 

Exchange Rates and Fundamentals: Closing a Two-Country Model

Date: 22 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Takashi Kano, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo

Abstract:

In an infutential paper, Engel and West (2005) establish near random-walk exchange rates in a simple equilibrium asset approach with I(1) fundamentals and the discount factor close to one. Subsequently, Nason and Rogers (2008) generalize the equilibrium random-walk property of nominal exchange rates into a two-country dynamic general equilibrium (DSGE) model with I(1) crosscountry money supply and TFP differentials. They find empirical evidence that permanent shocks to cross-country money supply and TFP differential dominate fluctuations in the bilateral exchange rate between Canada and the United States. In this paper, I argue that the cross-country TFP differential cannot be I(1) in order to close a canonical two-country DSGE model with incomplete financial markets. Understanding the empirical results of NR requires the stochastic trend processes of the two countries to be cointegrated with a suciently slow diffusion speed.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance; no RSVP required.

Engaging with the World: The Internationalization of Tourism Research

Date: 20 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor of Tourism Management Doug Pearce, School of Management / Tourism Management Group

Abstract:

This seminar raises questions about the internationalization of tourism research and discusses how tourism researchers and their institutions in New Zealand and elsewhere engage with the world. Five major questions are addressed:

  • what is meant by the internationalization of tourism research
  • what patterns are emerging
  • what is driving internationalization
  • what is the role of language in internationalization
  • what is the significance and impact of internationalization

The benefits and disadvantages of internationalization will be discussed in terms of the underlying tension between standardization and diversity. Finally, ways forward will be outlined.

Bio:

Professor Pearce has more than thirty years teaching, research and consulting experience in many aspects of tourism. Most recently his work has had a New Zealand focus, notably as leader of the FRST-funded project on tourism distribution channels. Other research interests and consultancy work have frequently taken him to Europe, the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. He is a fellow and former vice-president of the International Academy for the Study of Tourism and serves on the editorial boards of a number of tourism journals, including the Annals of Tourism Research.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

'The Rise in Foreign Retailing and New Zealand’s GST Exemption: Time for a Change?

Date: 20 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Summer Scholarship Research Assistant William Steel, with an introduction by Lincoln Gould, CEO of Booksellers NZ (sponsors of this research project).

Abstract:

This presentation will report on results from a recent project evaluating the economic and revenue costs of this distortion. It will argue that, by diverting domestic spending offshore, the government not only misses out on GST revenue, but also loses out on some company and PAYE tax revenue and is distorting consumer choices. But there are significant collection cost issues when trying to levy GST on low value purchases from foreign retailers. We discuss of a number of options to collect such GST revenue if New Zealand's foreign GST-free threshold was reduced, and outline how a cost-benefit analysis could be made.

In the past two decades the New Zealand retail market has undergone a rapid transformation. What was traditionally bought in stores is now increasingly being bought online. As a result many goods purchased from foreign websites, valued at up to $400 each, legitimately avoid paying 15% GST. Such an exemption creates a distortion that favours overseas retailers over their New Zealand based competitors.

Jointly hosted by Booksellers NZ, New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation (ISCR), and the Chair in Public Finance.

RSVP to Tracy.Warbrick@vuw.ac.nz with ‘RSVP GST Seminar’ in the subject line of your email if you would like to attend this seminar

Errors in Judicial Decisions: Experiments

Date: 15 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Joep Sonnemans, Professor of Behavioral Economics, University of Amsterdam

Abstract:

In criminal cases the task of the judge is foremost to transform the uncertainty about the facts into the certainty of the verdict. An extensive literature shows that people deviate from rationality when dealing with probability. It seems therefore unavoidable that in difficult criminal cases miscarriages of justice occur, but this is hard to study in the field. In a laboratory experiment we examine the relationship between evidence of which the diagnostic value is known, subjective probability of guilt and errors in verdicts for abstract criminal cases. We look at two situations:

  1. all evidence is given
  2. evidence can be acquired

In both situations verdicts are inaccurate. For given evidence, errors are biased towards the most serious type, unfounded conviction. In the situation where evidence can be acquired, participants do not acquire enough which results in many mistakes, evenly divided over unfounded convictions and unfounded acquittals. We suggest ways to reduce error. In a second study we look at the performance of groups of three instead of individual decision makers.

Bio:

Professor Sonnemans graduated in mathematics and social psychology at the University of Utrecht. After working as a researcher on social security at the Ministry of Social affairs and as a research associate in psychology at the University of Amsterdam, he joined CREED in February 1992. He is mainly interested in (experimental) research in which insights from economics and other social sciences (e.g. psychology) are combined or contrasted: expectation formation, bargaining, social behavior, law & economics and individual search behavior. In recent years he has become interested in behavioral finance and behavioral economics; part of the research is done in the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.

Professor Sonnemans is a member of the editorial board of Quantitative Finance and the Journal of Economic Psychology and was an Associate Editor of the European Economic Review from 2006-2012. He is also a Research Fellow of the Tinbergen Institute.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

My Time at the IASB and Challenges for the Future: A Conversation with Warren McGregor

Date: 14 March 2013

Time: 4.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Professor Warren McGregor, with commentary from Kimberley Crook (Deputy Chair of the NZASB) 

Abstract:

Warren McGregor was an inaugural member of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). During his time on the Board, which spanned 10 years and finished with him holding the position of Acting Vice Chairman, he directly participated in perhaps the most momentous change in financial reporting the world has seen. He will share his personal experiences of the IASB's journey, which he describes as often tumultuous. The Board was established initially as a type of accounting ‘think tank’ with a mandate to develop high-quality accounting standards that could be adopted on a voluntary basis by countries around the world. However, it soon gained an international constituency that thrust it into the hurly burly of international accounting standard setting. Before it knew it, the Board was faced with not only resolving challenging technical issues but also dealing with the politics and other pressures that accompany attempts to change accounting practices in highly controversial areas.

Professor McGregor will discuss some of the critical events that took place during this period, including the impact of some of the events on the people directly involved. He will also examine some of the challenges now facing the Board including bringing the US, Japan, and India into the IFRS family.

Bio:

Professor Warren McGregor is acknowledged worldwide for his contribution to the development of international accounting standards. He became a member of the International Accounting Standards Board in January 2001. Before joining the Board, he was a founding Director of Stevenson McGregor, a boutique accounting practice specialising in financial reporting and accounting standards. Prior to that, he was the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Accounting Research Foundation (AARF) for ten years, the body that until 30 June 2000 was responsible for providing technical support to the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) in the development of Australian Accounting Standards.

This Business Links Seminar is jointly hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research and the External Reporting Board. It will be followed by light refreshments on the Mezzanine Floor of Rutherford House; attendance is free but places are limited, so RSVP attendance to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz by Monday 11 March.

Transparency, Public Participation and Accountability for Fiscal Policy in New Zealand

Date: 13 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 501

A Seminar with three short presentations, chaired by Dr Chris Eichbaum

Speakers:

Dr Murray Petrie will briefly summarise his assessment of budget transparency in New Zealand against the international Open Budget Index. NZ ranked first out of 100 (mainly developing) countries in the 2012 survey, but there is still room for improvement, including with respect to the strength of legislative oversight, and opportunities for direct public participation in fiscal policy discussion and debate.

Becky Prebble, a Senior Analyst at The Treasury, will discuss the Long-Term Fiscal project. The Treasury is currently running a public engagement process in the lead up to the publication of its 2013 Long-Term Fiscal Statement. The process involves tried-and-true methods, like a conference on long-term fiscal issues, but also novel initiatives like a long-term fiscal competition for high school students. Becky will reflect on how the public engagement process has contributed to the Treasury’s thinking on long-term fiscal issues and will draw out some lessons for public engagement more generally.

Dr Chris Eichbaum will provide a brief overview of the rationale for Independent Fiscal Councils of various kinds, and of the arguments advanced in support of an Independent Fiscal Council in the New Zealand context.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

The Impact of User Fees on Health Care Utilisation: Evidence from a Policy Experiment

Date: 8 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Steven Stillman, Department of Economics, University of Otago

Abstract:

In this paper, we examine the impact of changes in the fees that patients pay when they use primary health care services on the utilisation of these services. Unlike the situation in many other OECD countries, the New Zealand government has traditionally provided only partial subsidies to support access to primary health care services, leaving New Zealanders to pay for much of their own primary health care through fee-for-service user charges paid to primary health care practitioners. It was widely felt that these fees have resulted in significant barriers to access to care, thus, in 2001, the government began to implement the Primary Health Care Strategy (PHCS). A key focus of the PHCS was to reduce the fees paid for using primary health care services. This was done by increasing the amount of funding allocated directly to primary health care providers and tying the allocation of this funding to whether fee reduction objectives were achieved by individual providers.

Bio:

Steve Stillman received a PhD in Economics from the University of Washington in 2000. He joined the University of Otago as a professor in the department of economics in July 2011. Prior to this, he was a senior fellow at Motu Economic and Public Policy Research from 2004 to 2011, a senior research economist at the New Zealand Department of Labour from 2002 to 2004 and a postdoctoral fellow at the RAND Corporation from 2000 to 2002. He is an affiliated researcher at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), the National Institute for Demographic and Economic Analysis (NIDEA), Motu Economic and Public Policy Research, the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research and the William Davidson Institute. Steve's research focuses on empirical labour economics, specialising in the behaviour of individuals and households. In recent research, he has examined the driver of immigration between Australia and New Zealand, the impact of migration to New Zealand on the income and health of Pacific Islanders both in New Zealand and in the Pacific, retirement behaviour among older Australians, and the effect of economic shocks in Russia on nutrition and overall living standards. Steve is broadly interested in research on migration, health, nutrition, education, household decision-making and inequality.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Effect of Audit versus Fraud Specialist Mindset on the Development of Problem Respresentation and Subsequent Fraud-Related Decision Making

Date: 8 March 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Mary Curtis, University of North Texas

Abstract:

Fraud risk assessment has a direct impact on the effectiveness of financial statement auditors' fraud detection during an audit. However, prior literature has shown that auditors are generally poor at assessing fraud risk. The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) suggests that auditors may improve their fraud risk assessment performance by adopting a fraud specialist mindset. Currently no research has examined the effects of the fraud specialist mindset on the financial statement audit process. In her presentation Professor Mary Curtis discusses whether it is possible to inculcate a specific mindset (audit or fraud specialist) on inexperienced auditors and to observe whether these mindsets will result in noticeably different fraud-related judgements.

Bio:

Dr Mary Curtis, Professor of Accounting, joined the UNT faculty in 1998. After completing her undergraduate and masters' degrees in accounting, Dr. Curtis worked for Cities Service and Bank of America in the MIS field, for Coopers&Lybrand as an IS Auditor, and as a private consultant in both of these fields. She then returned to school to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky, teaching at the University of Missouri-St. Louis before coming to Denton.

Professor  Curtis has taught in the areas of ethics, auditing and accounting information systems, and currently teaches the ethics course in the MS program and a seminar in the PhD program.

Dr. Curtis' publication topics have been varied. Articles of interest to the practitioner community include a series of articles related to the control and development of Data Warehousing, several articles on Executive Information Systems, as well as articles related to whistleblowing as a means of detecting fraud within the organization. Articles of interest to the academic community include those related to judgment and decision-making in such journals as The Accounting Review; Accounting, Organizations and Society; Journal of Information Systems; Journal of Business Ethics; Behavioral Research in Accounting and Auditing: A Journal of Theory and Practice. Current projects cover such diverse topics as whistleblowing and continuous auditing. Her primary interest is in Judgment and Decision Making, oriented toward improving the performance of professionals by helping them made more optimal judgments and decisions through reduced biases and improved decision processes.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial LawLee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz

Fit for Purpose? Examining the Current State of Broadband Regulation in NZ

Date: 6 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2

Speaker: Bronwyn Howell, General Manager of ISCR

Abstract:

Recent interplay between the government, Telecommunications Commission and sector participants over the price of regulated access to services supplied over Chorus' copper network calls into question the effectiveness of New Zealand's current regulatory regime in an environment where applications (including voice) have converged on a common digital platform, but where multiple infrastructures -- copper, fibre, wireless, cable and satellite -- can and do compete in retail markets. Despite having adopted many of the remedies used in regulating copper networks in other jurisdictions, the legislative environment in which they have been applied in NZ differs substantially from most of our OECD counterparts. This seminar examines the implications of these differences for future sector development, and in particular the evolution of government-funded ultra-fast broadband networks.

Bio:

Bronwyn Howell is currently General Manager of ISCR. She teaches professional programmes in Economics, Information Economy and Advanced Corporate Management through the Victoria University School of Management. She is also a Member and Secretary of the International Telecommunications Society Board. Bronwyn's research interests include: Information Economics; Industrial Organisation; and Regulatory Policy with a focus on the Information Technology and Health sectors.

Hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation. Tea and coffee will be provided from midday, seminar to commence at 12.30pm. This is a free seminar, but RSVP to Tracy.Warbrick@vuw.ac.nz or phone (04) 463-5562.

The Value of Incomplete Information: Do Better Informed Investors Always Do Better?

Date: 1 March 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Glenn Boyle, University of Canterbury

Abstract:

Investor rationality ensures that the possession of additional information is always advantageous, but experimental findings suggest more nuanced effects. We investigate this issue using data from auctions of standardbred yearlings between 2005 and 2007.  Breeders have superior information about their own horses, but those they choose to repurchase subsequently perform worse: breeders effectively sell their winners and retain their losers. This puzzling result does not appear to be due to weaker talent-spotting ability on the part of breeders, or to the revelation of breeder information during the bidding process, or to non-financial breeder objectives. However, we find some evidence consistent with breeders being overconfident in their assessments of their own horses, resulting in inferior investment decisions.

Bio:

Professor Boyle joined the University of Canterbury in December 2008 as the inaugural BNZ Chair of Finance, having previously been professor of finance at Otago University (1991-2004), and executive director of the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation (2004-2008). In addition to his position at Canterbury, Glenn is co-chair of the Australia-New Zealand Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee, a director of consulting firm Sapere Research Group, and a lay member of the NZ High Court.

A principal focus of Dr Boyle's research concerns the role and power of financial incentives, particularly in the controversial area of expert-service markets.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Tax, Law and Development

Date: 28 February 2013

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: Railway Station, RWW 129

Speaker: Professor Miranda Stewart, Director of Tax Studies at Melbourne Law School

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss the general theory and approach behind a forthcoming edited book Tax, Law and Development (Yariv Brauner and Miranda Stewart, eds) (Edward Elgar, 2013). While acknowledging fully the challenge of tax competition in a global economy, this book calls for new understanding -- from a legal and accounting perspective as well as from economics -- of the role and process of taxation and tax reform for development, in a global era. The book rejects calls to end taxation of mobile capital even if this may be perceived to be a theoretical economic inevitability due to the difficulty of collection in an uncooperative environment. Instead, we prefer new approaches to economic development (including approaches of Bill Easterly and Dani Rodrik). These new approaches suggest we must abandon -- or significantly downplay -- the dominant normative approaches to tax policy, replacing these with contextualized, diverse, partial and incremental tax law reform approaches that take seriously the legal, social and political context.

The book collects work from innovative legal scholars who examine the role of law in national and international tax regimes across a range of topical tax issues, from the perspective of countries including China, Brazil, South Africa, India and the United States. Chapters discuss the reform of tax laws that are central to economic globalization, including tax incentives for foreign direct investment, their relationship with tax treaties and other international tax law, the problem of how to address fundamental equity concerns, and institutions of budgeting, tax law making and administration in a global era.

Bio:

Miranda Stewart is a Professor and Director of Tax Studies at Melbourne Law School. She has many years experience in tax law in Australia and overseas. She is an International Fellow of the Centre of Business Taxation at Oxford University and was recently a visiting scholar at Christ Church, Oxford on the Melbourne-Oxford Faculty Exchange. Before joining the Faculty in 2000, Miranda taught at New York University School of Law in the leading International Tax program in the US. She has published on a wide range of tax law and policy topics, applying a critical perspective. She has an abiding interest in issues of tax and distributive justice in a global context. Miranda's current research is on tax, law and development, international tax coordination, and issues of gender and tax.

Hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research. Please note that places are limited, so RSVP attendance to vanessa.borg@vuw.ac.nz or phone 04 463 5078.

How Health Services Research Can Inform Methods As Well As Outcomes: A Case Study

Date: 28 February 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Professor Marion Haas, Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Technology, Sydney

Abstract:

Health Services Researchers find it relatively difficult to obtain funding for projects; it may be that focussing on improving health services (as opposed to improving health) as well as the combination of methods (mixed method research) often used in HSR is not as attractive to funders as clinical trials or other population-based research which use conventional and/or single methods. But HSR often represents very good value for money; as researchers, in addition to reporting results, we should also be using every opportunity to demonstrate all its advantages.

In this presentation, Marion will outline the results from a small "Linkage" grant funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC). The research set out to evaluate:

  • women’s preferences for attributes of alternative contraceptive products
  • what factors increase acceptability of new products to women and GPs
  • what is the effect of adverse information and positive promotion on women’s preferences for contraceptive products
  • how GPs choose which options to discuss and/or recommend to women

The results are not only interesting from a scientific perspective but have clear implications for practice, for education and training for providers and for industry. Moreover, we also made some interesting methodological advances in the course of undertaking the research, which in turn, built HSR capacity. Using case studies which illustrate how interesting questions from one perspective (eg clinical practice) are also capable of addressing others (policy, industry, educational) whilst at the same time advancing methods and building capacity is a potentially effective means of promoting HSR.

Bio:

Marion is Professor of Health Economics and a Deputy Director of CHERE. Formerly a physiotherapist, she has a Master of Public Health from the University of Sydney and a Graduate Diploma of Applied Epidemiology. A leading health services researcher in Australia for many years, Marion has extensive policy and research based experience of health services funding and financing in Australia. Her research interests are in the application of economic analysis to policy and practice; planning and evaluating health services; incorporating health economics into health services research, including clinical trials; the application of discrete choice methods to consumer preferences in health; and understanding the impact of health policy on access to, utilisation and costs of health care services. She is currently a chief investigator on a number of major grants, including the APHCRI funded Centre of Research Excellence in the finance and economics of primary care. She is Chair of the Human Research Ethics Committee at UTS. Marion is a founding member and Vice President of the Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre in association with the Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand; you are welcome to bring your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge.

Corporate Financing: Two Alternative Views

Date: 22 February 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Robert Kieschnick, University of Texas at Dallas, US

Abstract:

Modigliani and Miller (1958) reduce a firm’s financing decision to a two dimensional compositional problem by assuming certain components are perfect substitutes. In contrast, we argue that some forms of financing are compliments to other forms and so firms’ financing decisions are a multivariate compositional problem. We test these two different ways of thinking about how corporations approach the financing of their operations using data on U.S. corporations and find evidence inconsistent with the Modigliani and Miller way of framing business financing decisions but consistent with our proposed alternative. In addition, we find the role of security markets conditions to be more important to the use of multiple sources of debt than previously recognized.

Bio:

Dr Kieschnick is an Associate Professor at the University of Texas and teaches Finance and Managerial Economics. His research interests include

  • Initial public offerings
  • Corporate financing issues
  • Corporate governance
  • Mergers and acquisitions

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Simplifying the Taxation of Small Business in New Zealand

Date: 22 February 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 315

Speaker: Stephen Rutherford, Assistant Tax Director, NZICA

Abstract:

The New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants (NZICA) has published two papers on simplifying the taxation of small business in New Zealand. These papers are NZICA’s constructive thought piece on simplifying the taxation of small business.

The purposes of these papers was to:

  1. Recognise the changing landscape of accounting – changes in reporting requirements, technology and a desire to simplify tax systems globally
  2. To stimulate debate on how we could create a low compliance cost environment for small business, with the aim of encouraging growth and productivity

with the big idea being "The Rule of One" -- no more than one hour, one return, and one payment each month for income tax and GST compliance. NZICA considers there is value decoupling small business from the system that applies for New Zealand’s larger and more complex businesses.

Stephen Rutherford, NZICA’s Assistant Tax Director, will summarise the findings and invite feedback.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30 am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz

Manager-Employee Engagement Matters: What’s New?

Date: 21 February 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Maree Foley is a PhD student at the School of Management

Abstract:

This public forum will report on findings from a New Zealand-based employee engagement study conducted by Maree Foley (PhD Student, School of Management). Maree’s study explored connections between levels of employee engagement, and various engagement strategies that managers and employees use to communicate with each other about the job and organisational goals. Results indicated three distinct but related communication strategies that were also significantly associated with
a) levels of engagement; and
b) engagement outcomes such as; organisational commitment and the intention to quit.

Also, this study found that measuring levels of engagement in conjunction with different communication engagement strategies was a stronger predictor of organisational commitment than measuring engagement levels alone. The implications of these findings for raising levels of engagement will be explored. There will be time to discuss the research findings and an opportunity to table questions that are of interest across sectors regarding engagement. These questions will be compiled following the forum and will collectively contribute towards developing a New Zealand specific engagement research agenda.

Background:

Maree Foley is a PhD student at the School of Management, Victoria University. She has previously worked in the public and private sectors as a child and family psychotherapist, supervisor and trainer; and more latterly in private practice as an organisational coach. She is an executive member (currently on study leave) of the New Zealand Coaching Psychology Special Interest Group. She is also the President of the New Zealand Association of Infant and Family Mental Health (IMHAANZ) and is an executive board member of the World Association of Infant Mental Health.

Jointly hosted by the School of Management and the Industrial Relations Centre; all welcome.

Gov 2.0: Trends from the UK

Date: 20 February 2013

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4

Speaker: Ben Fowkes, Delib

Abstract:

This seminar will present case studies which focus on the changing nature of public engagement and consultation in the UK. There will a heavy focus on its digital nature and the push from within the Cabinet Office to make such activities 'Digital by Default'. The case studies will include some discussion around the Scottish Governments historic Independence Reference Consultation (#indyref) and Marriage and Civil Partnership Bill, Consultation, both of which have been run primarily online. We will also look at some examples from the Department of Health UK, before finishing with the use of Social Media in Crisis management.

Note: attendance free but registration is required.

Bio:

Ben leads the consultancy team at Delib, a digital democracy company that empowers a broad range of organisations to use the internet to engage their stakeholders in decision and policy making. Ben uses his internet expertise to help governments, the NHS, the police and local authorities to take part in meaningful citizen consultation and engagement. He has worked extensively with Scottish, UK, Canadian and Australian Governments, as well as private sector clients such as National Grid.

Jointly hosted by the School of Government, Department of Internal Affairs, Public Voice and Delib.

 

A Comprehensive Investigation into Voluntary IC Disclosure in Chinese Companies

Date: 15 February 2013

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 129

Speaker: Dr Yi An, Waikato University

Abstract:

Our research examines the extent and quality of voluntary intellectual capital (IC) disclosure by Chinese companies from various angles, as well as investigates if the disclosure practices of Chinese companies meet the expectation of stakeholders. A mixed methods approach, combining both qualitative and quantitative methods, was used. An IC disclosure index was developed as an instrument to analyze annual reports of the top 100 Chinese A-share listed companies.

Inconsistent with prior research (e.g. Abeysekera & Guthrie, 2005; Brennan, 2001; Guthrie & Petty, 2000; Oliveras, Gowthorpe, Kasperskaya, & Perramon, 2008; Schneider & Samkin, 2008; Yi & Davey, 2010), the results in this study indicate that the current level of IC disclosure was quite high in both extent and quality, and there was no significant information gap between the expectation of Chinese stakeholders and the actual disclosure practice of Chinese firms. We also observed that Chinese firms in such industries as finance, business services and utilities, usually performed better than firms in other industries. This research provides a comprehensive understanding as to the status of voluntary IC disclosure in the Chinese context, and makes significant contributions to the existing literature.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. The seminar will be receded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes by midday, 14th February.

 

Charities Regulation

Date: 13 February 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Dr Carolyn Cordery, Senior Lecturer, SACL

Abstract:

Internationally, there has been a steady increase in the number of countries instigating charity regulation. Public interest theory suggests that regulation increases organisational transparency, protects (or encourages) a competitive market, and leads to a distribution of resources which is in the public interest. While these arguments may explain charity regulation, the cost of compliance can be an issue for small and medium-sized charities. Therefore regulators tend to take a light-handed approach to small and medium charities' information provision. This seminar discusses the impact of light-handed enforcement on small and medium charities' reporting, analysing the financial reporting practices of these charities registered with the New Zealand Charities Commission against the Charities Act requirements, and how the regulator's activities might impact future reporting practices of charities.

Background:

Dr. Carolyn Cordery’s research interests are not-for-profit accounting and accountability, incorporating financial and non-financial reporting, regulation, and governance. This paper was developed for a panel on charity accounting and regulation for the International Society of Third Sector Research, which attracted papers from the UK, Ireland and Canada as well as New Zealand. Carolyn is a member of the New Zealand Accounting Standards Board.

Hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation. Tea and coffee will be provided from midday, seminar to commence at 12.30pm. This is a free seminar, but RSVP to Tracy.Warbrick@vuw.ac.nz or phone (04) 463-5562.

Dividing the Climate Burden Justly

Date: 8 February 2013

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway West Wing, RWW 501

Speaker: Ewan Kingston

Abstract:

Climate change presents humanity with a burden. Ewan will present a plausible account, inspired by Simon Caney, of what justice requires in the allocation of this burden. He will then defend the theory against objections, and consider how it could be applied.

Bio:

Ewan Kingston has just completed his MA thesis in Philosophy titled The Just Allocation of Climate Burdens. He has recently worked for Oxfam NZ as a policy and research intern, focusing on climate change, and has written for the Ecologist on various environmental issues.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Euthanasia and Assisted-Suicide

Date: 7 February 2013

Time: 7.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Dr Graeme McLean, Philosophy Programme, Charles Sturt University

In this seminar, co-hosted by The Nathaniel Centre, Dr McLean will address the issue of euthanasia and assisted-suicide: balancing the duty of care, the duty to sustain life, and the rights of the patient.

Bio:

Dr Graeme McLean is Senior Lecturer and Philosophy Co-ordinator at Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, Australia. He comes originally from Melbourne. He studied at Monash University (BA (Hons) and MA) and the University of Oxford (BPhil and DPhil). He was a visiting assistant professor at Regent College, Vancouver, in 1988, and from 1990 to 2004 a member of the Philosophy Department of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. In 1997 Dr McLean received the Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Award at the University of Witwatersrand, and in 2008 was awarded the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence at Charles Sturt University. His main philosophical interests are in the theory of knowledge, applied ethics, and philosophy of religion.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Asset Securitization Risks and Audit Fees

Date: 9 November 2012

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 413

Speaker: Professor Gary Monroe, School of Accounting, University of New South Wales, Sydney

Abstract:

Asset securitizations increase audit complexity and audit risks, which are expected to increase audit fees. Using US bank holding company data from 2003 to 2009, we find significant and positive associations between asset securitization risks and audit fees. Given the increased focus on the role of audits on asset securitization risks resulting from bank failures and the global financial crisis (GFC) that commenced in 2007, we expect that auditors would become more sensitive to banks’ asset securitization risks after the commencement of the global financial crisis. We find that auditors appear to focus on different aspects of asset securitization risks after the onset of the crisis and that auditors appear to charge a GFC premium for banks.

Bio:

Professor Monroe is an internationally renowned researcher in auditing with an emphasis on audit judgment and the economics of auditing, and financial reporting. He is a past President of the Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ). He received a PhD in Business Administration (accounting and information systems) from the University of Massachusetts in 1978. Prior to taking up his appointment at UNSW, he worked at the Australian National University, Edith Cowan University, University of Western Australia, University of Hawaii, Duke University and the University of Massachusetts. He has taught financial and management accounting, auditing, accounting information systems, behavioural research in accounting and research methods at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30 am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes by midday 8 November.

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Symposiums

Wellington China Business Symposium 2013: Improving China Business Strategy

Date: 30 July 2013

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: Icon, on Level 2 at Te Papa


Wellington China Business Symposium 2013

  • When: Tuesday 30 July, 2.00pm-5.30pm
  • Registration: Cash registrations will be accepted on Tuesday from 2.00-2.15pm at Icon Reception, Level 2, Te Papa
  • Programme: see the Symposium Schedule and Speaker Details

A unique opportunity to hear from two distinguished China business experts visiting Wellington, Professor Yuhuang Zheng (Tsinghua University, Beijing) and Patrick Chovanec (Managing Director and Chief Strategist at Silvercrest Asset Management, New York) following their keynote presence at the National China Business Symposium in Auckland.

Professor Yuhuang Zheng (Tsinghua University, Beijing)

Professor Yuhuang Zheng is Associate Professor of Marketing at the School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University, Chair Professor for the Marketing Case Analysis Executive Program, and teaches the Tsinghua-CEIBS-Harvard, Tsinghua-IFM-HEC, China CEO, and many other executive programs.

He also provides consulting and executive training services for many large corporations and institutions such as Bank of China, Beijing International Airport, BMW, and China Mobile.


 Patrick Chovanec (Managing Director and Chief Strategist at Silvercrest Asset Management, New York) Patrick Chovanec is Managing Director and Chief Strategist at New York-based Silvercrest Asset Management, which manages $13.5 billion in investments on behalf of wealthy families and selected institutions.

His insights into the global economy have been featured by both Chinese and international media, he has worked for several private equity funds focused on China, and advised numerous investment funds, Fortune 500 corporations, and governments.


Who should attend?

This half-day event will be a great opportunity for any firms or organisations from the Greater Wellington region and lower North Island who are engaging with China, or considering doing business in China. The symposium will have a Wellington perspective on business with China, so anyone with an interest in local businesses' experience in the China market, or finding out about what our business leaders see for the future with the Chinese market, should attend.

The Panel sessions feature Wellington-based China experts, including:

  • Tony Alexander - Chief Economist, BNZ
  • John McKinnon - Executive Director of Asia New Zealand, former New Zealand Ambassador to China
  • Vallen Han - Asia Marketing Director, New Zealand Post
  • Rhys Griffiths - Velvet Marketing Manager, Deer Industry New Zealand
  • Ian Douglas - founder of The Village Goldsmith and co-founder of The Inspired Collection
  • Gerard Quinn - CEO, Grow Wellington

For more information please contact:

Dr Hongzhi Gao
Senior Lecturer
Victoria University
Email: hongzhi.gao@vuw.ac.nz

Jeanne McKnight
International Relations Advisor
Wellington City Council
Email: jeanne.mcknight@wcc.govt.nz

The Wellington China Business Symposium is a joint initiative of Victoria University of Wellington (Victoria Business School), Wellington City Council, and New Zealand Contemporary China Research Centre.

 

Proposals to Restructure the New Zealand Electricity Market

Date: 4 July 2013

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1


Organised by Dr Geoff Bertram, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, Victoria University of Wellington

Background:

In a joint announcement in April, the Labour and Green Parties proposed major changes to the electricity market, to reduce the price of electricity for households and small industry and business by imposition of a 'single buyer' model on the wholesale market.

This one-day symposium will analyse the proposals, addressing both "efficiency" (the operational implications of the single-buyer model) and "equity" (potential impacts on energy poverty and the "long-term benefit of consumers").

Session 1 Speakers:

  • Moana Mackey MP (Labour)
  • Gareth Hughes MP (Greens)
  • Jonathan Young MP (National)
  • Rt. Hon. Winston Peters (NZ First)

Session 2 Speakers:

  • Dr Geoff Bertram, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, Victoria Univesity of Wellington
  • Professor Lew Evans, School of Economics and Finance, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Ian McChesney, Community Energy Action
  • Dr John Small, Covec

Programme Details (subject to change) available here and Speaker Backgrounds available here.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. RSVP TO igps@vuw.ac.nz, using Thursday 4 July in subject line.

SEF Research Symposium 2013

Date: 28 February 2013

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3

The School of Economics and Finance will hold its 4th SEF Research Symposium on Thursday 28 February 2013; see Programme Details below.

The keynote speaker is Christoph Thoenissen, Professor of Macroeconomics, who will be presenting "News and Business Cycles in an Open Economy with Financial Frictions".

  • There is no fee to attend the Symposium, but registration for catering numbers is required by 5pm Friday 22 February; contact Bonnie Riley.

All PDF documents require Acrobat Reader.

Document File size File type
SEF Research Symposium 2013 Programme 420 KB PDF

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Workshops

Archives and Cultural Memory Master Class

Date: 3 September 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House

A special event with international archive expert and researcher, Professor Eric Ketelaar.

Overview:

Many archives represent themselves as being the memory of a particular city or country, and UNESCO has developed a ‘memory of the world’ programme to promote the documentary heritage of the peoples of the world. These labels however misrepresent the complexity of collective memory. This masterclass will examine the specific role of archival documents as memory texts supporting collecting memories, placing archives in the context of a broader discourse on collective/cultural/social memory, the construction of communities’ identities and uses of the past.

Course format: This masterclass will be run as a full-day workshop, with a maximum of 18 participants. Participants will be asked to present a case and to engage in a discussion about the applicability of it to the workshop’s content.

Who should attend: Archivists, records managers, museum and heritage sector professionals, librarians, academics and others with the desire to explore the notion of cultural memory in depth.

See the Registration Page for further details.

Bio:

Eric Ketelaar is Professor Emeritus at the University of Amsterdam. From 1997 to 2009 he was Professor of Archivistics in the Department of Mediastudies of the University of Amsterdam. As an honorary fellow of his former department he continues his research which is concerned mainly with the social and cultural contexts of records creation and use. Eric Ketelaar was General State Archivist (National Archivist) of The Netherlands from 1989-1997 and held the archivistics chair in the Department of History, University of Leiden, 1992-2002.

He was visiting professor at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor), Gakushuin University (Tokyo), the University of Toronto and Monash University (Melbourne), where he continues to be involved as a Senior Research Fellow in Monash’s Center for Organisational and Social Informatics. He is one of the three editors-in-chief of Archival Science.

NZ Macroeconomic Dynamics Workshop 2013

Date: 22 April 2013

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, RHMZ05

Keynote Lecture to be delivered by Professor Amnon Levy, University of Wollongong

Background:

The Macroeconomic Dynamics Workshop, hosted by the School of Economics and Finance, is held in honour leading macroeconomist Professor Stephen J. Turnovsky (Castor Chair of Economics at the University of Washington).

This year Professor Amnon Levy from the University of Wollongong will give the keynote lecture, entitled "Optimal Control of Broadcasting Spectrum with Variety-Reception Trade-off and Consumers’ Income Sensitivity". Prof. Levy has published more than 45 papers in international peer-reviewed journals, including Journal of Development Economics, Journal of Economics and Finance, Journal of Macroeconomics, and Macroeconomic Dynamics.

Document File size File type
Macroeconomic Dynamics Workshop 2013 Programme  520 KB PDF

There is no registration fee for this event, but RSVPs to Bonnie.Riley@vuw.ac.nz are required for catering purposes.

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