Victoria Business School

Past Events

Conferences

Banking Regulation: Taking Stock and Looking Forward

Date: 4 August 2014

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: RBNZ Museum & Education Centre, 2 The Terrace, Wellington

This half-day conference, organised by Insititute for the Study of Competition and Regulation, has a great line-up of national and international speakers from academia and the public sector.

Programme

Welcome – Christine Southey

  • 8.45 Kevin Davis, University of Melbourne.
    Australian banking regulation: Current issues
  • 9.15 Kirk Hope, the NZ Bankers' Association.
    Regulating globally – banking locally: The impact of international regulation on the NZ banking market
  • 9.45 Toby Daglish, ISCR.
    A Variable Savings Rate as a tool for monetary policy
  • 10.15 Morning tea
  • 10.45 David Tripe, Massey University.
    Deposit insurance in New Zealand
  • 11.15 David Hargreaves, Reserve Bank.
    Enhancing stress tests of the New Zealand banking system
  • 11.45 Jon Garfinkel, University of Iowa.
    Bank financing strategies in the face of different risk pricing across claims
  • 12.15 Closing followed by lunch

Note: Registration for this event is required, and there is a $60pp fee for the day which includes a morning tea and lunch. Registrations close 28 July.

HRINZ Research Forum: Call for Papers

Date: 1 August 2014

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Pipitea campus of Victoria University of Wellington

The Academic Branch of Human Resources Institute of New Zealand (HRINZ) is holding a one-day Research Forum called "What's happening in workplaces?" on Thursday 20 November 2014, at Rutherford House, Pipitea Campus.

The Academic branch is a 'virtual branch', designed to complement and contribute to the geographic branches of HRINZ.

One of its key goals is to strengthen the engagement between HR academics and HR practitioners, to mutual benefit, advancing relevant HRM research, on the one hand, and evidence-based HRM practice and policy advice, on the other.

If you wish to share your HRM research, hear and discuss the research of others, or network with people who may provide research expertise, collaborations or opportunities, the HRINZ Research Forum is for you.

Call for papers

Authors wishing to present a paper at the forum can contact us for a full version of the call for papers:

The deadline for abstracts is Friday 1 August 2014 by 5.00pm.

The abstract should explain the goals of the paper, briefly outline its theoretical basis and research methods, and explain how the findings are relevant to HRM practitioners in New Zealand.

UNANZ Conference: The Global Commons, Public Goods & Governance

Date: 9–10 May 2014

Time: 8.00 am

Venue: Parliament (Legislative Council Chamber) & Rutherford House (RHLT1)


The United Nations Association of New Zealand's national conference is their premier event that brings together members from several UN branches to participate in panel discussions and hear speakers from throughout the world. The conference also hosts our National Secondary School Speech Awards finals.

This year they have partnered with the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and the New Zealand Centre for Global Studies to offer a two day conference full of interesting lectures and panel discussions at no charge to the public. The aim of UNANZ is to help educate New Zealanders about the activities of the United Nations and its agencies. They work to bring public attention to New Zealand's involvement and to make more information available about how all New Zealanders can become involved in working with the United Nations.

See here for a full conference programme and list of speakers.

There is no charge but registrations are required. For further information, please email office@unanz.org.nz

Co-hosted by the Australia and New Zealand School of Government Visiting Scholar Programme at Victoria University of Wellington, the United Nations Association of New Zealand and the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies.

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Information Events

State Your Case: Business Case Competition

Date: 2 August 2014

Time: 8.30 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Ground Floor & Mezzanine rooms

An invitation for Victoria University undergrad students from all disciplines to find out about the 2014 Business Case Competition.

The third and final event of the VBS Business Case Competition, for teams of Victoria University undergrads across all disciplines, will be held at Rutherford House on Saturday 2 August. 

  • Entries close Thursday 31 July @ midday
  • Register or get further details by emailing commerce@vuw.ac.nz

The VBS Business Case Competition will select a team to compete in the first round of the SDS National League:

  • hone your presentation & analytical skills
  • get noticed by judges from top consulting & finance companies
  • test yourself against the best from New Zealand, and be in with a chance to compete in the international showdown in Queenstown

In 2013 there were three events in the Student Development Society National League, plus a fourth International Case Competition held over a full week in Queenstown.

The team sent to compete (with all expenses paid) was selected during the Victoria Business Case Competition in April.


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Other Events at Victoria

Ideas on Tap: Research Talks at The Thistle Inn

Date: 26 August 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, Mulgrave Street, Wellington

Ideas on Tap image

Corruption: Crisis or Chimera?

Recent media reports have identified a "corruption paradox" in New Zealand public life: a perception of proliferation of corruption, in what is internationally recognised as one of the least corrupt countries in the world.

In 2014 there have been a number of high-profile integrity investigations in sport and politics, including MP John Banks being found guilty of filing a false electoral return.

Dr Michael Macaulay, the Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, will discuss the following key questions:

  1. Are all of these really corruption issues?
  2. How severe is the problem?
  3. What can and/or is being done about it?

Get a drink from the cash bar and join us for this informal talk about current research carried out at Victoria Business School. 

  • Date: Tuesday 26 August
  • Time: 5.30pm (for a 5.45pm start)
  • Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Wellington
  • RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz or telephone 04-463 6888

About Dr Michael Macaulay

Michael Macaulay is the Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies at the School of Government. His research interests are in the areas of integrity, ethics and anti-corruption, and he has worked on international anti-corruption projects with organisations such as Transparency International and the Council of Europe.

Dr Macaulay’s work has been cited in numerous national policy documents in the UK, and has been published in journals around the world. He is the co-editor of the International Journal of Public Administration, and sits on the editorial boards of several other journals.

IMCNZ Forum: IBM’s Global C-suite Study

Date: 14 August 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

NZIMCVictoria Business School and the Institute of Management Consultants New Zealand invite you to a presentation from Andrew Tubb CMC (Managing Partner - IBM Global Business Services, New Zealand) and Peter Johnston (Lead Business Strategy Consultant on IBM's global C-suite study)

  • Where: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)
  • Time: 5.30-7.15pm; drinks, nibbles & networking from 5.30-6.00pm
  • RSVP: info@imcnz.org your attendance so that we can cater accordingly

Background:

IBM's global C-suite study honed in on the personal views of over 4000 top business leaders in over 70 countries, over 50 of them from New Zealand's leading organisations, on how they plan to meet these demands through new customer strategies, social, mobile and analytics capabilities, and supporting business model innovations.

In New Zealand, the results showed that our top leaders are honest in reporting that they are behind the rest of the world when it comes to truly understanding customers and delivering to these heightened expectations. At the same time, our leaders are also more ambitious than the rest of the world in closing this gap in the next 3-5 years.

Andrew Tubb and one of his Lead Business Strategy Consultants, Peter Johnston, will share these study insights and focus discussion on, practically speaking, what NZ businesses can be doing to realise this bold ambition.

2014 IMC Strategy Prize

Before the IBM session begins the 2014 IMC Strategy Prize will be presented. This prize, sponsored by IMC, is awarded to the top strategy paper in the Victoria MBA each year.

About IMCNZ

The Institute of Management Consultants New Zealand (IMCNZ) is a professional organisation for Management Consultants and is a member of the International Council of Management Consulting Institutes (ICMCI), the governing body of the profession with member Institutes in 43 countries and over 25,000 members worldwide.

The IMCNZ aim is to raise and maintain the industry standards for Management Consultants in New Zealand through the provision of skills certification, continuing professional development opportunities and peer support.

Ideas on Tap: Research Talks at The Thistle Inn

Date: 24 June 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon

Ideas on Tap image

Tax Evasion, Welfare Fraud, and Justice

It is well established that tax evasion is viewed as a less serious offence than welfare fraud, despite the greater economic significance of tax evasion.

Associate Professor Lisa Marriott will discuss the extent to which tax evaders and welfare fraudsters can expect to be treated differently at various stages of the justice system in New Zealand.

  • Date: Tuesday 24 June
  • Time: 5.30pm (for a 5.45pm start)
  • Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Wellington
  • RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz by Friday 20 June or call 04-463 6888

Get yourself a drink from the cash bar and join us for this informal talk about research carried out at Victoria Business School.

About Associate Professor Lisa Marriott

Lisa Marriott is an Associate Professor of Taxation at Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Accounting and Commercial Law. Her research interests include social justice and inequality, and the behavioural impacts of taxation.

Dr Marriott has publications in a range of refereed journals and is the author of The Politics of Retirement Savings Taxation: A Trans-Tasman Perspective. She was recently awarded a Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Grant to investigate the different treatments of tax evasion and welfare fraud in the New Zealand justice system.

VBS-IMCNZ Forum: International Consultants Day

Date: 19 June 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

NZIMCVictoria Business School and the Institute of Management Consultants New Zealand invite you to a presentation celebrating International Consultants Day from renowned inspirational speaker Cath Vincent: Wake Up Your WOW

  • Where: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3). Note that this is a change of venue from that orriginally advertised.
  • Time: 5.30-7.00 pm (Drinks and nibbles supplied)
  • RSVP: info@imcnz.org your attendance so that we can cater accordingly

Background:

Cath Vincent is an expert with over 20 years’ experience in communications and change. She is passionate about unleashing a person’s hidden potential to get great results through inspiration rather than perspiration – or as she calls it “Wake Up Your WOW!”

Human beings are creatures of habit and we typically do the same things and get the same results. In this session you will learn how to do things differently to get better results in any areas of your life so you can operate at your maximum and be your personal best.

Through Cath’s unique 6-layer model for change, you will discover:

  • What impacts your personal wow
  • Micro changes you can make straight away to get more of what you want
  • How to change habits for greater success

Bio:

Cath Vincent has set up business consultancies in the UK, Australia and New Zealand, and her software company won a UK DTI award for innovation.

Before relocating to New Zealand, she was living in Perth advising on communication strategies on multi-million dollar infrastructure projects. Her clients included mining companies, government agencies and the electricity network.

She is an international keynote speaker delivering presentations to the likes of KPMG, Chevron, and the State University of Texas. In the last six months she has achieved two major accolades for professional speakers – she won the National Speakers’ Association Bright Star Award, and was invited to speak at TEDx which is filmed and broadcast worldwide.

International Consultants Day

The Institute of Management Consultants New Zealand (IMCNZ) is a professional organisation for Management Consultants and is a member of the International Council of Management Consulting Institutes (ICMCI), the governing body of the profession with member Institutes in 43 countries and over 25,000 members worldwide.

The IMCNZ aim is to raise and maintain the industry standards for Management Consultants in New Zealand through the provision of skills certification, continuing professional development opportunities and peer support.

The first proposal for an International Consultants Day was made in 1999 by Shanker Gopalkrishnan, the Trustee for IMC India. India pioneered the celebration of the day and subsequently more countries have been involved; International Consultants Day is now an established date in many member institutes’ diary of events.

Ideas on Tap: Research Talks at The Thistle Inn

Date: 6 May 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

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Measuring the Economics of the Canterbury Earthquakes: Muddy Waters and Red Flags

The devastation caused by the Canterbury earthquakes, particularly in relation to the proportion of New Zealand’s GDP, was one of the most damaging natural events globally in recent years.

Professor Ilan Noy, Victoria Business School’s Chair in the Economics of Disasters, will discuss the current state of the economy of the Canterbury region, how it got to that state, and what the future might hold for Christchurch.

  • Date: Tuesday 6 May
  • Time: 5.30pm (for a 5.45pm start)
  • Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Wellington
  • RSVP by Friday 2 May to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz or telephone 04-463 6888

Get a drink from the cash bar and join us for this informal talk about current research carried out at Victoria Business School.

About Professor Ilan Noy

Originally from Israel, Professor Ilan Noy came to Victoria in 2011 from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa, where he was an Associate Professor in Economics. He was appointed to the professorial Chair in the Economics of Disasters (CED) in July 2013. Co-sponsored by Victoria University, the Earthquake Commission (EQC) and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), it is understood to be the first such Chair in the world. Professor Noy’s research and teaching interests include the economics of disasters, international finance, and development economics.

Beta Alpha Psi - Mock Interviews

Date: 17 March 2014

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level

The Victoria chapter of Beta Alpha Psi invites members to their first professional event of 2014, "Mock Interviews", which will be worth one professional point.

  • Each employer will ask a series of questions similar to those in one of their typical interviews, then provide each member with feedback on their performance
  • After 15 minutes, each group will rotate to the next employer
  • The event will conclude with drinks and nibbles, providing an opportunity to network and talk further with employers

Confirmed employers attending include:

  • Audit NZ
  • Bank of New Zealand
  • Enst & Young
  • Deloitte
  • FNZ
  • PriceWaterhouseCoopers

Further details from the Beta Alpha Psi website »

 

Business Case Competition: Information Session

Date: 12 March 2014

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

An invitation for Victoria University undergrad students from all disciplines to find out about the 2014 Business Case Competition.

The opening event of the VBS Business Case Competition, for teams of Victoria University undergrads across all disciplines, will be held at Rutherford House on Saturday 15 March.

  • Information session on Wednesday 12 March, Level 12 Boardroom of Rutherford House, from 5.00-5.30pm
  • Entries close Thursday 13 March @ midday
  • Register or get further details by emailing commerce@vuw.ac.nz

The VBS Business Case Competition will select a team to compete in the first round of the SDS National League:

  • hone your presentation & analytical skills
  • get noticed by judges from top consulting & finance companies
  • test yourself against the best from New Zealand, and be in with a chance to compete in the international showdown in Queenstown

There will also be a second VBS Business Case Competition to select a team for Round Two of the National League during May.

In 2013 there were three events in the Student Development Society National League, plus a fourth International Case Competition held over a full week in Queenstown.

The team sent to compete (with all expenses paid) was selected during the Victoria Business Case Competition in April.


NZICA Career Speed Dating

Date: 5 March 2014

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: NZICA Conference Centre, Level 7, Tower Building, 50 Customhouse Quay

Announcing the Wellington leg of the 2014 NZICA Career Speed Dating series

Background:

The New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants (NZICA) Career Speed Dating programme, now in its fourth year, has gained a reputation in the accounting and student community as a ‘must attend’ event.

All the major employers will be present, with registrations already from the major public practice employers as well as the Government and Corporate sector (including Banking).

For any student who is looking for a grad job, this is a major event; it is free to take part, but spaces are limited and applications close Monday 10 February.

How to apply:

If you would like to attend, please follow these simple steps to apply:

  1. If you're not already an NZICA Student Affiliate, register at www.nzica.com/tertiary
  2. Apply for a ticket through through EventBrite. The Career Speed Dating event in Wellington will be held on Wednesday 5 March at the NZICA Conference Centre
  3. If you are successful, you will receive an email asking you to provide a CV, academic transcript, and a few other items prior to the event
  4. Do your prep about what companies will be attending, and what you want your future employer to remember about you. Most of all relax, have fun, and be yourself!

If your application is successful, you will be notified by email or phone call by Tuesday 18 February, so please ensure you provide valid contact details.

Contact your local Student Affiliate Engagement team member If you have any questions:

Ideas on Tap: Research Talks at The Thistle Inn

Date: 25 February 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon

Ideas on Tap image

The Role of Information Technology in Business Productivity: It's more important than you think

In a world where organisations are in constant movement, the role of IT becomes more significant than ever. For a long time, managers have invested in IT to increase the productivity of their firm. What they might not have realised is that certain ways of doing so also increases dramatically their capacity to capitalise on reorganisation efforts. The ability of the firm to benefit from organisational change is highly dependent on the quality of its IT resources.

Professor Benoit Aubert will discuss the role IT plays in productivity improvement and in the capacity of the firm to innovate. Research results provide guidelines for managers to help them get the most benefits from these investments.

  • Date: Tuesday 25 February
  • Time: 5.30pm (for a 5.45pm start)
  • Venue: Upstairs at The Thistle Inn, 3 Mulgrave Street, Wellington
  • RSVP to kay.demalmanche@vuw.ac.nz or call 04-463 6888

Get yourself a drink from the cash bar and join us for this informal talk about research carried out at Victoria Business School.

About Professor Benoit Aubert

Benoit A. Aubert is Professor of Information Systems in the School of Information Management. His work investigates the management of IT in organisations. Previously, he has been Professor at HEC Montreal (the first Business School in Canada) and CEO of CIRANO (a university-enterprise joint venture).

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Public Lectures

National and Labour Outline Their Economic Visions for New Zealand

Date: 1–2 September 2014

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

CPF

In the run up to the 2014 General Election on 20 September, the Chair in Public Finance is pleased to host two Pre-election Public Lectures on the state of the Government's finances after the election.

What Will the Economy Look Like Under a National-led Government?

Hon Bill English, Minister of Finance and National's Deputy Prime Minister, on the future of the Government’s finances after the 2014 general election.

  • When: Monday 1 September, 3.00-4.00pm
  • Where: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1, (Stout Street entrance)
  • RSVP: Libby.Wight@vuw.ac.nz (quoting the lecture title in the subject line), or call 04 463 9656

What Will the Economy Look Like Under a Labour-led Government?

Hon David Parker, Labour Finance spokesperson and Deputy Leader, on the future of the Government’s finances after the 2014 general election

  • When: Tuesday 2 September, 3.00-4.00pm
  • Where: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1, (Stout Street entrance)
  • RSVP: Libby.Wight@vuw.ac.nz (quoting the lecture title in the subject line), or call 04 463 9656

Why Men Cook but don’t Wash-Up

Date: 27 August 2014

Time: 6.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Presenter: Associate Professor Ian Yeoman, School of Management

Background:

2014-logoAs part of the Visa Wellington On a Plate food festival, Associate Professor Ian Yeoman will present a free public lecture on an emerging brand of male: the Gastro craftsman.

 The Gastro craftsman is typically an upwardly mobile male, aged between 25 and 44, who is passionate about food and the rewards it brings including, potentially, seduction.

In his book The Future of Food Tourism (due to be published this year), Dr Yeoman cites research from Britain that shows that one in six British women struggle to cook basic dishes, and 79 percent find cooking as a hobby attractive in men.

Entry is free but seats are limited, so get there early to secure your place.

2050: The Future of Food Festivals

Date: 18 August 2014

Time: 6.00 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 5, RWW 501

Presenters: Katherine Findlay, Sochea Nhem, Sophea Tieng & Sandra Goh from the Bachelor of Tourism Management Honour’s programme

Background:

2014-logoFood is an important tourist attraction, and food and tourism have a close symbiotic relationship. Local food can play a central role in tourism products, whether it is the Hokitika Wild Food Festival or Toast Martinborough.

But what is the future? Is it stem cell burgers or back to basics?

Students from Victoria University’s postgraduate tourism programme present their thoughts on four scenarios about the future of food festivals, drawing on the latest research and industry viewpoints.

Q & A during session, and the audience will receive an e-copy of students’ work after the event.

Entry is free but seats are limited, so get there early to secure your place.

 

Distinguished Lecture Series: What Are Business Models and Why They Matter

Date: 12 August 2014

Time: 6.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

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Associate Professor Dan Laufer, Head of the School of Marketing and International Business at Victoria Business School, warmly invites you to a public lecture by Professor David W. Stewart, President’s Professor of Marketing and Law at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles.

What Are Business Models and Why They Matter

At the heart of every successful organization is a well-designed business model. Defined simply, a business model is the way an organization makes money and sustains itself over time.

This presentation explores the characteristics of successful business models and observes that firms in the same industry may employ quite dissimilar business models with very real differences in how they realize income, define costs, and organize their activities. While business models are most often discussed in the context of for-profit firms, the presentation will also explore their role in not-for-profit and government organizations.

  • Time: 6.00pm for pre-lecture refreshments, followed by the lecture from 6.30-7.30pm
  • RSVP to rebekah.sage@vuw.ac.nz,  or phone 04-463 5723, by Monday 4 August

About Professor David W. Stewart

Professor David W. Stewart. David W. Stewart is President’s Professor of Marketing and Law at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles. He is currently the editor of the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing and has previously served as editor of the Journal of Marketing and the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.

Professor Stewart has previously held faculty and administrative appointments at Vanderbilt University, University of Southern California and the University of California, Riverside and served as a research manager for a major advertising agency.

His research focuses on marketing strategy, the analysis of markets, consumer information search and decision making, effectiveness of marketing communications, public policy issues related to marketing and methodological approaches to the analysis of marketing data.

Can Standardised External Tests Affect School Outcomes? Evidence and Policy Implications

Date: 4 June 2014

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

The Chair in Public Finance, Victoria University of Wellington and the Ministry of Education invites you to attend a public lecture by Professor Ismael Sanz, Director of the National Institute for Education Assessment (Instituto Nacional de Evaluación Educativa, INEE) and Professor in the Department of Applied Economics at the University Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.

In this lecture, Professor Sanz will discuss his research into the impacts of standardised external examinations in secondary school, using data collected across Spain, and explore potential policy implications of the outcomes of this research.

All welcome, with limited places available; RSVP to Libby Wight at libby.wight@vuw.ac.nz.

About Professor Ismael Sanz

Ismael Sanz is Professor in the Department of Applied Economics at the University Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain, and Director of the National Institute for Education Assessment (Instituto Nacional de Evaluación Educativa, INEE), a central government body that coordinates Spain's participation in international education tests such PISA, TIMSS, etc.

From 2009 to 2011 he was advisor of the Education Ministry of the Regional Government of Madrid. As a representative of Spain, Dr Sanz is member of the PISA Government Board, the Strategic Development Group of PISA, Board of Participating Countries of PIAAC (Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies), General Assembly representative of the IEA (International Association for the Evaluation of Education Achievement) and representative of the Education Policy Committee of the OECD.

In addition to research into the effects of international education tests, Dr Sanz research interests include fiscal policy, education, economic growth and globalisation. His research has been published in leading international journals such as the Economic Journal, Canadian Journal of Economics and Public Choice. He has been a research visitor at various overseas universities including the University of Nottingham (UK), the Universities of California Santa Barbara and Harvard (US), University of Otago, and Australian National University. He has also served as a consultant to the World Bank, European Commission and the New Zealand Treasury.

Are Prices High in New Zealand? And, if so, why?

Date: 21 May 2014

Time: 4.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

CPF

An invitation from the Chair in Public Finance at Victoria University of Wellington, and the New Zealand Productivity Commission, to a public lecture by Professor Norman Gemmell.

Are prices high in New Zealand? And, if so, why?

At this lecture Professor Norman Gemmell will discuss his research on how prices in New Zealand compare internationally and potential reasons for any price differences between New Zealand and other countries. This will include discussion of how the prices for tradables and non-tradables in New Zealand compare internationally and the role of factors like population sizes, factor endowments (agricultural land, labour, capital, mineral wealth) and trade policies and trade balances. This work was commissioned by the New Zealand Productivity Commission.

  • Speaker: Professor Norman Gemmell, Chair in Public Finance
  • Date: 4.00-5.00pm, Wednesday 21 May
  • Venue: Lecture Theatre 3, Rutherford House, Pipitea Campus

All welcome, no RSVP or registrations required. Limited to 60 seats

About Professor Norman Gemmell

Professor Norman Gemmell joined the School of Accounting and Commercial Law in November 2011, as the first Chair in Public Finance. Established by Victoria University, with sponsorship from the three New Zealand government departments (Inland Revenue, Ministry for Social Development and Treasury) and PricewaterhouseCoopers, the Chair aims to bring together academic research on public finance with applications to tax policy in practice.

Norman came to the role having previously been Chief Economist and Principal Adviser (Tax) at The New Zealand Treasury (2007-11), an Assistant Director of the UK Inland Revenue’s Research Department (2003-06), and Professorial Research Fellow (1999-2007) and Professor of Development Economics (1996-99) at the University of Nottingham, UK. Norman also helped set up, and participated in, the VUW Tax Working Group which advised the Minister of Finance on the major tax reforms included in his 2010 Budget.

His research interests cover a range of topics across economics and political economy but mainly in the areas of public finance (taxation, public expenditure and public debt) and economic growth. He has authored several books and numerous journal articles in these areas and articles in peer-reviewed journals. In 2012, Norman was awarded the "Economist of the Year" by an independent panel of economists sponsored by the New Zealand Institute for Economic Research, and was appointed to the New Zealand Treasury’s External Panel of independent experts advising Treasury on its 2013 Long-Term Fiscal Statement.

Sir Frank Holmes Memorial Lecture in Policy Studies: Learning From Regulatory Disasters

Date: 1 April 2014

Time: 6.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1 (RHLT1)

Speaker: Professor Julia Black, Director of the Law and Financial Markets Project, London School of Economics and Victoria University of Wellington's 2014 Sir Frank Holmes Fellow

Abstract:

From leaky buildings to financial crashes, from mining disasters to deep water oil spills, and from poor patient care to financial misselling, regulation can fail to prevent disasters arising from the risks it is meant to manage. Although each disaster is unique in many respects, analysis of the regulatory failings that contributed to those disasters reveal a number of common themes. When regulation fails, it fails in quite consistent ways.

This lecture dissects regulatory disasters to find out what lessons can be learned.

  • Introduction and welcome: Professor Brad Jackson, Head of School, School of Government
  • Opening Speaker: Professor Grant Guilford, Vice-Chancellor, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Moderator: Professor Jonathan Boston, Director, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Distinguished Lecture Series: Emotion and Decision Making

Date: 1 April 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Grand Space, Level 1, Rydges Wellington, 75 Featherston Street, Wellington

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Associate Professor Dan Laufer, Head of the School of Marketing and International Business at Victoria Business School, warmly invites you to a public lecture by Professor Mary Frances Luce, Thomas A. Finch Jr. Professor of Business Administration at the Fuqua School of Business, Duke University.

Emotion and Decision Making

Research demonstrates many mechanisms whereby emotions may influence either the amount or specific form of decision processing. Professor Luce will present initial data addressing how emotions influence decision processing strategies. One study has found that, while sadness causes apparently more complete processing, anger and happiness cause processing that seems more responsive to the decision environment and hence potentially more efficient. One general theme beginning to emerge from these studies is that it is important to understand how emotion interacts with specific aspects of task structure.

RSVP by Tuesday 25 March to rebekah.sage@vuw.ac.nz or telephone 04-463 5723.

About Professor Mary Frances Luce

Professor Mary Frances LuceMary Frances Luce is the Thomas A. Finch Jr. Professor of Business Administration at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.

She is currently a co-editor of the Journal of Consumer Research, and her research interests lie in consumer behaviour, medical decision-making, and the effects of negative emotion on decision behaviour.

Her recent research has appeared in American Journal of Bioethics, Emotion, and the Journal of Consumer Research and Health Psychology. She was recently Fuqua’s Senior Associate Dean for Faculty.

Age Friendly Workplaces

Date: 28 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Professor Simon Biggs, Professor of Gerontology and Social Policy, Melbourne University

Background:

This presentation will examine, amongst other things, recent findings from the international literature on the prevalence of elder mistreatment and its implications. The lecture will be chaired by Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, Victoria University.

Bio:

Professor Biggs is a renowned researcher on the policy implications of population ageing. His recent research includes a World Health Organisation’s "Age friendly cities" project; an ESCR study of baby boomers; uses of adaptive technology in later life; and a UK National Prevalence Study on elder abuse and neglect.

He is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Ageing Societies, and his current focus is the analysis of international and national social policy.

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and the New Zealand Association of Gerontology. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Elder Abuse, Social Ageism and Human Rights

Date: 18 February 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Speaker: Professor Simon Biggs, Professor of Gerontology and Social Policy, Melbourne University

Background:

This presentation will examine, amongst other things, recent findings from the international literature on the prevalence of elder mistreatment and its implications. The lecture will be chaired by Dr Michael Macaulay, Associate Professor in Public Management, Victoria University.

Bio:

Professor Biggs is a renowned researcher on the policy implications of population ageing. His recent research includes a World Health Organisation’s "Age friendly cities" project; an ESCR study of baby boomers; uses of adaptive technology in later life; and a UK National Prevalence Study on elder abuse and neglect.

He is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Ageing Societies, and his current focus is the analysis of international and national social policy.

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and the New Zealand Association of Gerontology. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Development, Challenge of China's Agriculture

Date: 18 February 2014

Time: 4.30 pm

Venue: Beehive Theatrette, Parliament Buildings, Wellington

Hon Nathan Guy, Minister of Primary Industries, invites you to attend a lecture by Mr Chen Xiwen, Deputy Head (Minister-level) and Director of the Office, Central Rural Work Leading Group and Deputy Director of the Office, Central Leading Group on Financial and Economic Affairs.

Background:

Chen Xiwen is a highly respected agricultural economist who has made major contributions to China’s economic policy making on agricultural development and the rural economy.

Throughout his career he has engaged in research on issues relating to rural economic theory and policy. Since the 1980s he has participated in drafting most of China’s key documents in this area (most notably China’s No. 1 Central Document on agricultural development each year) for both the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and the State Council.

He has published extensively and is frequently interviewed and quoted in the media. He has won the prestigious Sun Yefang Economics Awards, and in 1992, he was awarded a special stipend from the Chinese Government for his contribution and expertise.

  • What: Development, Challenge of China’s Agriculture
  • When: 4.30pm, Tuesday 18 February 2014
  • Where: Beehive Theatrette Parliament Buildings, Wellington
  • RSVP (essential for seating and security purposes): emily@silvereyecomms.co.nz or phone Emily Rowe on 027 344 0664
Document File size File type
Hon Nathan Guy - Invitation 100 KB PDF

In association with Victoria Business School, the New Zealand Contemporary China Research Centre, and Silvereye Communications Limited

Lessons from the Financial Crisis: A New World Order

Date: 10 February 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1


Victoria University of Wellington invites you to a Public Lecture by Lord King of Lothbury, the Reserve Bank Professorial Fellow in Monetary and Financial Economics.

  • Date: Monday, 10 February 2014
  • Reception: 5.30-6.00pm
  • Lecture: 6.00pm-7.00pm (including questions)
  • Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1, Victoria University

Abstract

The financial crisis of 2007-09 had a devastating effect on the advanced economies and global repercussions. Preventing another crisis will involve much more than reform of the banking sector; it may require no less than a new world order for economic relations among countries.

About Lord King of Lothbury

Lord King of LothburyLord King of Lothbury is currently a distinguished visiting professor at New York University Stern School of Business and New York University School of Law.

He served as Governor of the Bank of England and Chairman of the Monetary Policy Committee and Financial Policy Committee from 2003-June 2013.

He was previously Deputy Governor from 1998 to 2003, Chief Economist and Executive Director from 1991, and non-executive director of the Bank from 1990 to 1991.

Lord King of Lothbury is visiting New Zealand as the Reserve Bank Professorial Fellow in Monetary and Financial Economics.

 

RSVP by Monday, 27 January 2014 to deborah.osullivan@vuw.ac.nz with "Lord King" in the subject line, or telephone (04) 463 7431.

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Seminars

How Do Firms Form Their Expectations? New Survey Evidence

Date: 5 September 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Saten Kumar, Senior Lecturer in Economics, AUT University

Abstract:

We implement a new survey of firms’ macroeconomic beliefs in New Zealand and document a number of novel stylised facts from this survey. Despite nearly twenty five years under an inflation targeting regime, there is widespread dispersion in firms’ beliefs about both past and future macroeconomic conditions, especially inflation, with average beliefs about recent and past inflation being much higher than those of professional forecasters.

Much of the dispersion in beliefs can be explained by firms’ incentives to collect and process information, i.e. rational inattention motives. For example, firms which face more competitors or firms which expect to change their prices sooner have systematically better macroeconomic information.

Bio:

Dr Saten Kumar teaches at the AUT Business School in the areas of macroeconomics and econometrics. His research interests are in

  • inflation dynamics (price setting behavior of firms)
  • how agents form their expectations
  • inflation measurement and the welfare costs of inflation

He is currently using primary quantitative surveys to investigate the price setting behaviour of firms and the way they form their expectations. In doing so, he is able to assess whether the price-setting decisions are consistent with the theoretical framework of workhorse New Keynesian models.

Dr Kumar has refereed articles for journals such as Journal of Macroeconomics, Applied Economics, Economic Modelling, Journal of International Money and Finance and Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The Effect of the US-Chile Free Trade Agreement on the Earnings Quality of Chilean Firms

Date: 29 August 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW315

Speaker: Mariela Gallardo, PhD candidate in Accounting, University of Auckland Business School

Abstract:

This paper examines whether a change in a government trade policy that significantly increases the interaction of domestic firms with a foreign product market can affect the financial reporting quality of those domestic firms. I focus on Chile where the US-Chile Free Trade Agreement (FTA) came into effect on January 1, 2004. The FTA resulted in significant increases in US exports and imports for Chilean firms. Khanna et al. (2004) find that greater interaction with US product markets can improve the disclosure quality of non-US firms from countries with low accounting quality.

Using a sample of 208 Chilean companies, discretionary accruals as measure of earnings quality and a variety of product market interaction proxies, results show that the FTA lead to improvements inthe accounting quality for Chilean firms, particularly for those that had the largest increases in interaction with US product markets.

Bio:

Mariela Gallardo is a PhD candidate in Accounting at the University of Auckland Business School and her doctoral dissertation is conducted under the supervision of Professor Steven Cahan.

She previously studied a Bachelor degree in Accounting and a Master degree in Finance at the University of Chile, and worked as a researcher and lecturer in financial accounting at the same university for several years.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Land Use Change Between Forestry and Agriculture Under the New Zealand ETS

Date: 28 August 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11 Meeting Room, RH1113

Speaker: Bonnie (Yue) Wang, Economics PhD Student, University of Auckland

Abstract:

This paper investigates land use change between forestry and agriculture under the NZ ETS. Using a static forest-computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with interrelated production chains among twelve industries-all harvested natural timber is used as an intermediate input to the forestry processing sector. Five types of land can be allocated between one forestry and four agricultural sectors.

This paper shows that a higher carbon price extends timber rotation age and yield, in turn, raising the demand of forest land use. The results illustrate that a carbon tax can be a solution towards lower carbon emissions.

Bio:

Bonnie (Yue) Wang is currently an Economics PhD student at University of Auckland. Bonnie is interested in environmental economics and CGE modelling. She has three years’ experience in Energy & Resource economics and Environmental economics tutoring.

Her PhD thesis analyses the land use change between the two primary industries (forestry and agriculture) in New Zealand, and further seeks to investigate the optimal carbon credit price under the current NZ Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Creating Economies: An Introduction to Agent-Based Social Simulation / An Agent-Based Model of Interdisciplinary Science and the Evolution of Scientific Research Networks

Date: 15 August 2014

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Dan Farhat, Department of Economics, University of Otago

Abstract:

This study uses an individual-based simulation model to identify the potential impact of research success on the structure of scientific communities. In this simple model, heterogeneous scientists scattered about a ‘social landscape’ influence each other through local networking. Peer networks change based on accumulated achievements (or prestige). The dynamics of these networks are illustrated. The framework is adjusted to allow for interdisciplinary practices (modelled as network links to more distant peers). Separate disciplines are shown to collapse into a grand scientific network. The implications of this outcome are described.

Bio:

Dan Farhat is a Lecturer at University of Otago (Department of Economics). His background includes:

  • Macroeconomic Theory (Business Cycles)
  • Macroeconomic Theory (International)
  • Microeconomic Theory
  • Labour Economics (Macro)
  • Education Economics (Macro)
  • Economic Methodology

Dr Farhad's received the OUSA Teaching Award Nomination and Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award – Department of Economics, UC Riverside in 2009.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

The British Domination of Accounting Education in a French Colony: The Case of Cambodia

Date: 15 August 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Associate Professor Prem Yapa, School of Accounting, RMIT University, Melbourne

Abstract:

In examining Cambodian accounting education, we analyse programs offered by Cambodian universities and the local accounting body, under the sponsorship of the state. With the availability of local accounting degree programs, one might expect that there are adequate numbers of suitably qualified accountants to meet Cambodian needs. Our findings indicate it is not necessarily the case. Over recent decades, the changing nature of the economy, the state and the interests of the business sector (including the ‘Big Four’) have led to the wider adoption of the UK’s Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) qualifications. This has occurred as a result of technical, pedagogic and operational problems in indigenous accounting education.

Drawing upon a theoretical framework of professional accounting education, we use the results of interviews to describe the development of accounting education in Cambodia. Our conclusion is that the ACCA is seeking to dominate and control the supply of professionally qualified accountants in Cambodia.

Bio

Associate Professor Prem Yapa (B.Com, MBA, PhD, CPA –Australia, CMA-Australia) has extensive experience in research teaching and consultancy in accountancy projects nearly 35 years.

 He worked as an academic in several universities including: Sri Lanka (Colombo, SJU - Universities), Belgium (KUL University), Brunei University, Brunei Shell Company; UK (Oxford University), Rotterdam (Erasmus University), China (Tsinghua and Tianjin universities). He was Head of School in the Department of Commerce at SJU and the Department of Accounting at the University of Brunei.

His research projects have been funded by - CPA Australia, Association of Finance and Accounting in Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ), Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), School of Accounting and Public Sector Governance and Accountability Research Centre (PSGARC), and Centre for Sustainable Regional Communities - La Trobe University, University of Wollongong, College of Business – RMIT University, Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning (ASAIHL), Thailand.

Prem has more than 70 research papers, articles, conference papers in reputed academic journals and conference proceedings to his credit. Prem has successfully supervised a few PhD students and presently he is serving in a few editorial advisory boards of some journals including the Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal.

He has received ‘outstanding paper awards’ from some top tier academic journals and from some international conference papers. Prem has been a visiting professor to Oxford University –Said Business School, Tsinghua University in Beijing-PRC and Erasmus University – Rotterdam, Singapore Management University, Singapore and Otago University, New Zealand during the past few years teaching and researching in accounting.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Social Interactions Between Visitors in New Zealand

Date: 6 August 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Ina Reichenberger, Tourism Management Group at Victoria University

Abstract:

The importance of the social aspect of travelling in general and contacts between visitors in particular has not been questioned. In fact, as tourists we are rarely alone but nearly always find ourselves in the proximity of other visitors. However, little is known about how visitor-visitor interactions manifest themselves, what impact the contact with other visitors can have on holidays and what personal meaning they hold for individuals.
Ina’s PhD research examines social interactions between previously unacquainted independent travellers in New Zealand. In doing so, it addresses the reasons why visitors interact with each other, what the dimensions and natures of these interactions are, how they are perceived and evaluated and how they can impact the visitor experience in New Zealand. 

Bio:

Ina Reichenberger is about to complete her PhD degree with the Tourism Management Group at Victoria University. With a background in Sociology, she worked as a research fellow in tourism at the University of Passau in Germany before beginning her studies in New Zealand in 2011.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

The Cost of Market vs. Regulatory Discipline in Banking

Date: 30 July 2014

Time: 5.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

The New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation (ISCR) invites you to the 2014 S. T. Lee Visiting Fellow seminar, presented by Professor Jon Garfinkel, University of Iowa

Abstract:

Banks have many sources of funding to obtain loanable capital. Taking deposits exposes banks to regulatory scrutiny (discipline), which is costly. On the other hand, issuing non-deposit liabilities exposes them to market discipline, which is also costly. These two costs differ because regulators impose risk-based capital standards based on all bank assets, while markets impose discipline on a claim by claim basis. Regulators may also impose differential treatment depending on the sources of the bank's risks. Sudden increases in risk have different implications for banks that use relatively more or less deposit financing. In the US, downgrades of bank credit ratings hurt banks: they raise the expected cost of funds.

However, banks with more deposit funding (particularly insured deposits which often are from small investors who are less sensitive to risks), see their value hurt less than banks with less deposit funding. Moreover, credit downgrades are associated with increased use of deposits as a form of financing by the bank: the bank acts as if the cost of regulatory discipline is cheaper than the cost of market discipline. In fact, precisely where the public has more cause to worry (riskier banks), the bank exposes the regulator (and potentially the public) to more risk.

This presentation will conclude with a preliminary discussion of some implications for New Zealand of the US findings.

Drinks and nibbles will follow this free seminar; to attend email iscr@vuw.ac.nz

About Professor Jon Garfinkel

Professor Jon Garfinkel is a Professor of Finance and a Henry B. Tippie Research Fellow in the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. His research focuses on both banks and general corporations, with a particular emphasis on their investment and financing behaviours. He also has studied the measurement and influence on asset prices of investor opinion divergence.

Professor Garfinkel's primary teaching responsibilities lie in Corporate Finance. He is a proponent and avid user of the FLIP teaching technique and has won numerous teaching awards. His Ph.D. is from the University of Florida (1994) and he also earned an undergraduate economics degree from Virginia Tech (1988).

Hosted by the NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation. Drinks and nibbles will be provided after the seminar; RSVP your attendance to iscr@vuw.ac.nz  

Competition and the Hold-Up Problem: A Setting with Non-Exclusive Contracts

Date: 25 July 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Guillem Roig, PhD Exchange Scholar, Toulouse School of Economics (visiting Massey University –Albany Campus)

Abstract:

This work studies how the introduction of competition to the side of the market offering trading contracts affects the equilibrium investment profile in a bilateral investment game. By using a common agency framework, where trading contracts are non-exclusive, we find that the equilibrium investment profile depends on the level of competition of the trading outcome. Full efficiency can only be implemented when the trading outcome is the most competitive. Moreover, a low level of competition is not always Pareto dominant for the parties offering the trading contracts, and larger welfare can be obtained with lower competitive equilibria.

Bio:

Guillem Roig is a PhD Exchange Scholar who will be visiting Massey University (School of Economics and Finance) at the Albany Campus and the ATE Research Network until mid-September 2014. Guillem will defend his PhD thesis at the Toulouse School of Economics upon his return from Massey University, later in the Fall (European Fall). Under the PhD supervision of Professor Jacques Crémer, Guillem has worked on several research essays, all in the area of applied microeconomic theory, with a focus on industrial organisation, internal organisation of the firm and contract theory.

More recently, Guillem has been working on mechanism design approaches combined to industrial organisation, in preparation for his post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Melbourne, Economics Department, due to start on January 2015 under the scientific supervision of Professor Claudio Mezzetti, a prominent mechanism design expert.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Measuring and Reporting Service Performance of New Zealand Local Governments

Date: 25 July 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Prae Keeransuntonpong, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Abstract:

In the public sector, financial results are only one aspect of demonstrating accountability with non-financial performance information being an integral part. Regulators in various jurisdictions have introduced non-financial performance reporting for public sector entities to fulfil their accountability purpose. Nevertheless, public sector organisations' reporting of non-financial performance information appears to be substandard. Even in New Zealand, where formal non-financial or service performance reporting has been early mandated for two decades, practices have been observed to be poor.

 To address the problem, some major initiatives have been introduced in New Zealand in addition to the existing legislative requirement. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of these initiatives – the criticisms of the Office of the Auditor-General and the examples of better reporting practice – on service performance reporting of New Zealand local governments.

The findings reported suggest that the normative pressure from the Office of the Auditor-General is crucial and relevant to local governments facing increased demands for accountability. Regulators in New Zealand and other jurisdictions may emphasise the use of normative pressure in tandem with coercive pressure to improve their public sector’s non-financial performance reporting.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Employment Agreements: Bargaining Trends & Employment Law Update Seminars

Date: 25 July – 5 August 2014

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Dunedin, Christchurch, Hamilton, Auckland and Wellington

The Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (CLEW) presents the 21st series of their annual seminars during July / August 2014.

The Employment Agreements: Bargaining Trends and Employment Law Update seminars provide participants with a comprehensive overview of bargaining and case law developments over the last 12 months.

The seminar series has established a reputation as the definitive source of practitioner-focused information on current employment relations practices in New Zealand.

Police Use of Social Media for Public Engagement

Date: 24 July 2014

Time: 1.30 pm

Venue: National Library Building, Ground Floor Seminar Room

Speakers: Karen Jones (Deputy Chief Executive, Public Affairs) & James Whitaker (Manager, Brand and Corporate Communications), New Zealand Police

Background:

NZ Police has a large, and growing, online and social media presence. Social media is used for community engagement, prevention advice, recruitment and investigative purposes.

Nationwide, NZ Police and the public affairs team manage:

  • 36 live Facebook pages including regional, workgroup and neighbourhood policing team pages
  • 7 active twitter feeds including national and regional feeds as well as specialised channels for recruitment and the Police College
  • 2 YouTube channels for police news and recruitment profiles
  • One Instagram account launched this month

In the last three years of social media use NZ Police has gained:

  • 200,700 Facebook followers
  • 21,000 twitter followers
  • 224 million impressions
  • 2.1 million interactions with members of the public

Come along and hear some #betterworkstories regarding our learnings with social media and online communications.

Bio:

Karen Jones is the Deputy Chief Executive Public Affairs at NZ Police and is the principal adviser on communication matters internally and externally. Karen leads a team providing strategic advice, media relations, online communications, stakeholder relations, internal communications and recruitment marketing, as well as overseeing the Police Museum. She is an advocate for the power of social media and accesses twitter, facebook and blogs daily (@nzpolice & @kmljones), as well as keeping with her teenagers via Instagram and Snapchat.

Hosted by the Chair in e-Government. All welcome, but venue is limited to 80 seats; please register your interest at e-government@vuw.ac.nz or phone Lynn Barlow on 04 463 6966.

Air Services Agreements and New Zealand Connectivity with the Rest of the World

Date: 23 July 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Sonya van de Geer, ‎Principal Adviser at the Ministry Of Transport

Background:

Air services are vital for New Zealand’s connectivity with the world. In tourism, 99% of international visitors arrive by air. The international aviation regulatory environment which dates back to 1944 restricts, often severely, the services that airlines may offer. New Zealand has for more than two decades pursued one of the most liberal aviation policies in the world to remove these barriers. While some countries focus on airline interests, New Zealand looks at wider economic, social and foreign policy benefits in increasing aviation linkages. The past three years, particularly since the release of a new International Air Transport Policy in 2012 have seen an acceleration in this activity. More airlines than ever before have the option of offering services to New Zealand.

Looking to the future, we are working with the international aviation community to develop a multilateral agreement which will free the aviation industry from the current complex web of bilateral arrangements.

Bio:

An economics and political studies graduate from the University of Auckland, Sonya van de Geer joined the Ministry of Transport in 1996 from the Treasury. While at the Ministry, Sonya has worked across transport modes including on the framework for tolls and public private partnerships under the Land Transport Management Act and the development of a domestic sea freight policy. Throughout that time she has focussed on issues relating to international aviation.

Since 2013 Sonya has led the New Zealand delegation in air services negotiations. During this time the pace of air services liberalisation has increased, drawing impetus from the 2012 International Air Transport Policy and the benefits of negotiating at the annual International Air Services Negotiations Conference. Sonya has also represented New Zealand in a number of international fora, including the International Civil Aviation Organisation General Assembly.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

The Challenge for Social Democracy: A Public Conversation

Date: 9 July 2014

Time: 5.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1 (RHLT1)

Speakers: Anna Yeatman (Professorial Fellow) & Eric Sidoti (Director), Whitlam Institute, University of Western Sydney

Background:

In the past, Australia and New Zealand shared a robust and vital political tradition of what we might call a liberal republican version of social democracy – a vision of each of these states as a sovereign political association that is the embodiment of a public capacity to respond effectively to collective challenges. A vision that provides the conditions for equal and effective citizenship.

This talk will focus on why it is that this tradition has faltered and how it might be recovered. The argument will be that it is not so much the principles of social democracy that we need to invoke; rather we need to rediscover the argument for these principles in a way that responds to the terms of the present.

Bio:

Anna is political philosopher and author of many publications, the most recent of which is Feminism in the Technological Age (Australian Feminist Studies, 2014) and co-authored The Aporia of Rights: Explorations in citizenship in the era of human rights (Bloomsbury, forthcoming 2014).

Eric has been the Institute's Director since 2007. He has been actively engaged in public policy development and advocacy throughout his working life. This has included appointments as the Executive Director of the Human Rights Council of Australia, various roles for Amnesty International in Australia and as National Secretary of the Catholic Commission for Justice and Peace.

The Whitlam Institute was established at the University of Western Sydney in 2000 as a research and education base that reflects the significance of progressive public policy initiatives.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; limited to 150 seats.

Assessing Policy Counterfactuals with a Simulation-based Inquiry System

Date: 9 July 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speaker: Professor Peter Davis, COMPASS Research Centre, University of Auckland University of Auckland

Abstract:

Our research group has developed a simulation model that uses real-world data from existing longitudinal studies to mimic a representative sample of biographical trajectories in the early life-course. Because these data populate a simulation model that is calibrated to the real world, we have in effect created an inquiry system that can be interrogated by posing realistic counterfactual arguments of either a policy or theoretical nature. In this presentation I will outline details of construction and will ask the question as to which causal mechanisms make the most difference to various social outcomes of both policy and theoretical interest, contrasting the impact of aggregated/structural factors versus personal attributes.

We find that our results are broadly similar across three domains – in health, education, and social behaviour – and show that structural factors can make more of a difference than personal behaviour, and can do so in such a way that the benefits of "intervention" flow disproportionately to the most disadvantaged.

Bio:

Peter Davis is Professor of the Sociology of Health and Well-Being and Director of the COMPASS Research Centre at the University of Auckland, with cross-appointments in the Department of Statistics and in the School of Population Health. His interests are in the application of advanced research methods to existing data in the fields of health and social policy.

The COMPASS Research Centre is entirely grant-funded - HRC, MBIE, Marsden, CoRE - and has been operating for over a decade. It supports two senior research fellows, two research officers and a manager. It also operates a data archive and a summer school in research methods.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Coalition Government: Reflections on the United Kingdom

Date: 1 July 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 1, RWW 129

Speaker: Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, House of Lords, UK

Background:

The UK General Election of May 2010 resulted in a hung parliament and, following negotiations between the Conservative Party (which secured the most seats but no overall majority) and the Liberal Democrats, the country's first coalition government since Churchill's War Ministry emerged. The 'first-past-the-post' electoral system which still operates in the UK means that, unlike in New Zealand, coalition government is a rarity rather than the norm.

Few would suggest that the Conservatives and Lib Dems are natural bed-fellows, and their alliance took many observers by surprise. Yet, despite many tensions, and much vilification by its opponents, their administration remains intact four years later. Indeed, the Coalition now looks likely to hold together until the next General Election in May 2015, albeit that each party seems to be making strenuous efforts to separate out from government proposals the particular benefits due to them. It is clear that both are anxious to impress upon the public well-focused and separate profiles ahead of moving into campaigning mode - and that the next year is going to be a long one!

As a member of the UK's second chamber, the House of Lords, Lord Griffiths has been privileged to observe the coalition from close-up. In this lecture he gives his candid impression - as a member of the opposition Labour Party - of its working, achievements and weaknesses. He also assesses whether coalition government has been 'good' for the UK and the likelihood of it becoming more common in the future.

Bio:

Leslie Griffiths, the Rev'd the Lord Griffiths of Burry Port, has been a member of the House of Lords since 2004. He sits on the Labour benches and speaks on education, international affairs and a range of social and ethical issues. He was the President of the Methodist Conference in 1994-5 and an influential church leader in the two decades since.

He helped to get the Christian Socialist Movement affiliated to the Labour Party and has twice given the prestigious Tawney lecture - in 1995 on 'The Survival of Hope' and in 2002 on 'Multiculturalism'. A prolific author, popular speaker and respected broadcaster, he has been senior minister of Wesley's Chapel at the heart of London since 1996.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome but limited to 37 seats, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Integrated Reporting: The Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership

Date: 1 July 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Professor Derick de Jongh, University of Pretoria

Abstract:

The Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership has as one of its core focus areas the emerging field of Integrated Reporting. South Africa though its King Report on Corporate Governance has played a significant role in driving the Integrated Reporting agenda internationally.

The Centre developed the first ever Post Grad Diploma in Integrated Reporting (PGDIR) which was offered for the first time in 2013 and is one of the flagship programmes of the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership.

The PGDIR firstly aims to develop the managerial and leadership skills that will be required to develop sustainable strategies within the organisation in the new emerging paradigm of embedding sustainability imperatives into business practice.

During this public lecture, Prof Derick de Jongh will offer some theoretical background to the Post Grad Diploma by sharing research findings on a research project that was conducted towards the end of 2013. These findings as well as some theory will be included in his presentation.

Bio:

Derick de Jongh entered academia after a 13-year banking career where he focused largely on human resource development, ultimately with a specialisation in corporate strategy, strategic market positioning and corporate citizenship. His move to academia was spurred by a deep and personal realisation that the private sector in South Africa was failing dismally in reflecting critically on the purpose of business and, more specifically, on the role of business in society.

Through his doctoral studies Derick realised that the best way of shaping the debate on corporate citizenship in South Africa was to establish a university-based centre focusing on research and teaching on the broad topic of corporate responsibility and governance.

Derick joined the University of South Africa in 2002 as the founding director of the Centre for Corporate Citizenship, and has contributed on a variety of levels, both locally and internationally, towards advancing the field of corporate responsibility.

The quest to develop the next generation of responsible leaders has become his mission in life and he was given the opportunity to establish the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership (CRL) at the University of Pretoria in February 2009. The ALCRL is an interdisciplinary unit located in the Department of Business Management, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Community and Voluntary Sector Research Forum

Date: 24 June 2014

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 5, RWW 501

  • Cherida Fraser (completing an MSc in cross-cultural psychology): "The AppleCART Project: Action research aiming to improve health and wellbeing of a ‘hard-to-reach’ Māori community"
  • Frances Kelliher (Circability Trust): "Developing community circus in Aotearoa New Zealand: Evaluation techniques and conclusions"
  • Nishanie Pereira (completing a PhD at the School of Information Management): "Exploring ICT use in non-profit organisations that provide services for older people who live within the community."

A number of academics at Victoria University research in, and for, the community and voluntary sector, with many of our postgraduate students also researching in this area.

As well as networking within the University, this research is shared with the community through regular Community and Voluntary Sector Research (CVSR) Forums.

The forums run from 3.00-5.00pm, with tea and coffee available from 2.45pm, and are held in Railway West Wing 501 (use the Victoria University door on the left hand side of the Station, then take the first lift to the 5th floor or one of the other lifts to the 4th floor and walk up a flight of stairs).

General public are most welcome to attend these regular seminars.

Document File size File type
  CVSR Forum Flyer (June 2014)    450 KB PDF

The US Obesity Epidemic: New Evidence from the Economic Security Index

Date: 20 June 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Trent Smith, Department of Economics, University of Otago

Abstract:

A growing body of research supports the “economic insecurity” theory of obesity, which posits that uncertainty with respect to one’s material well-being may be an important root cause of the modern obesity epidemic. This literature has been limited in the past by a lack of reliable measures of economic insecurity.

This paper uses the newly developed Economic Security Index to explain changes in US adult obesity rates as measured by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 1988-2010, a period capturing much of the recent rapid rise in obesity. We find a robust positive and statistically significant relationship between obesity and economic insecurity that holds for nearly every age, gender, and race/ethnicity group in our data, both in cross-section and over time.

Bio:

Dr Trent Smith's research interests lie primarily in the area of behavioural economics. Drawing on evidence from a wide array of behavioural sciences - including psychology, anthropology, behavioural ecology, neuroendocrinology, and molecular biology - he applies theoretical and empirical methods from economics to phenomena such as addiction, obesity, economic insecurity, and television advertisements.

He has previously worked at Washington State University (US), the University of California, Los Angeles (US), and the University of Bonn (Germany). His teaching at Otago includes introductory business statistics and behavioural economics.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Earthquake Preparedness in an Ageing Society: Learning from the Canterbury Experience

Date: 12 June 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3)

Speakers: Dr Judith Davey (Senior Research Associate of the Institute of Governance and Policy Studies) & Dr Jenny Neale (Senior Research Associate of the Health Services Research Centre)

Background:

Given the ageing of the NZ population, especially rapid growth in the 85-plus age group, we can predict that there will be very large numbers of very old people, mainly living in the community, many alone or with a partner only, and many in need of support. This scenario must be central to disaster planning and all other service and policy planning.

We set out to find what could be learnt from the experience of the Canterbury earthquakes, using an investigative approach, drawing information from a wide range of sources from central government agencies to neighbourhood groups and individuals. We looked at both the immediate impacts of the earthquakes on older people and the long-term outcomes.

Although older people are often typified as a vulnerable group, they also displayed considerable resilience and resourcefulness, suggesting that they can make a significant contribution at the time of disasters and in the recovery period.

The project was funded by the Earthquake Commission in their 2012 Biennial Contestable Grants programme.

Hosted by the Health Services Research Centre; our seminars are informal so feel free to bring your lunch and your colleagues. RSVPs are not required and there is no charge. Any enquiries to maggy.hope@vuw.ac.nz.

Breaking the Link Between Legal Access to Alcohol and Motor Vehicle Accidents: Evidence from New South Wales

Date: 6 June 2014

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Associate Professor Jason Lindo, Department of Economics, Texas A&M University

Abstract:

A large literature has documented significant public health benefits associated with the minimum legal drinking age in the United States, particularly because of the resulting effects on motor vehicle accidents. These benefits form the primary basis for continued efforts to restrict youth access to alcohol. It is important to keep in mind, though, that policymakers have a wide variety of alcohol-control options available to them, and understanding how these policies may complement or substitute for one another can improve policy making moving forward. Towards this end, we propose that investigating the causal effects of the minimum legal drinking age in New South Wales, Australia provides a particularly informative case study, because Australian states are among the world leaders in their efforts against drunk driving.

 Using an age-based regression-discontinuity design applied to restricted-use data from several sources, we find no evidence that legal access to alcohol has effects on motor vehicle accidents of any type in New South Wales, despite having large effects on drinking and on hospitalisations due to alcohol abuse.

Bio:

Jason joined Texas A&M University in July 2013, whilst currently holding other appointments as a Visiting Principal Fellow at University of Wollongong; Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

His research focuses primarily on children and young adults, but he sometimes delve into other areas when stuck by a research question that is too interesting or important to pass up. In teaching, he thinks the most important thing is to get students excited about the topic.

He also thinks it is important to not take sides so students can learn how economists approach problems, what sorts of things they consider, and what types of arguments they respect.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Learning Lessons from the Open Government Partnership Summit

Date: 30 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

Speaker: Dr Michael Macaulay, Deputy Director, Institute for Governance and Policy
Studies
, School of Government

Background:

The Open Government Partnership (OGP) is a global initiative which has seen 64 nations create policies to increase transparency, accountability and integrity. In all of these countries, government and civil society are working together to develop and implement ambitious open government reforms.

New Zealand committed to join in December 2013 and is currently drafting its first OGP Action Plan. This lecture will ask what lessons have been learned from fellow OGP initiatives, how New Zealand should go about engaging public participation and what will be in the OGP Action Plan.

The OGP is holding a conference in Bali, 6-7 May at which Dr Macaulay is a presenter. The conference is serving as a platform for countries and communities within the region to connect, share and learn from each other on the benefits and opportunities to share across open and good governance practices.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Empowering the Individual in the Labour Market Through Skills - An Assessment of New Labour's Record in England, 1997-2010

Date: 29 May 2014

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Professor Ewart Keep, Department of Education, Oxford University

Background:

Professor Keep is currently working on the role of recruitment and selection as a source of skills and the feedback signals that employers’ patterns of recruitment send to the learner; future research priorities in the field of E&T, and how English policy makers conceive of skills policy and its linkages to other policy domains.

Bio:

Professor Ewart Keep is a member of the Scottish Funding Council/Skills Development Scotland joint Skills Committee, HEFCE’s Strategic Advisory Committee for Enterprise and Skills, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills’ Policy Expert Group, and the Scottish Government’s Skill Utilisation Leadership Group.

He has provided advice and consultancy for the National Skills Task Force, DfES, DTI, DBIS, H M Treasury, the Cabinet Office, House of Commons and Scottish Parliament committees, the Welsh Employment and Skills Board, Skills Australia, and the governments of Queensland, New South Wales and New Zealand.

Professor Keep's research interests include:

  • lifelong learning policy
  • learning organisations
  • training for low paid workers
  • the design and management of education and training systems
  • employers’ attitudes towards skills and what shape these
  • recruitment and selection activity
  • how governments formulate skills policy
  • higher education policy and the nature of the linkages between skills and performance (broadly defined)

Hosted by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (previously the Industrial Relations Centre) as part of their 2014 Lunchtime Seminar Series.

Tea and coffee will be available and you are welcome to bring your lunch; there is no charge for the seminar and no RSVP is required.

A Multilevel Theory of Effective System Use: Insights from the Users of an Electronic Health Record System

Date: 26 May 2014

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, GB117

Speaker: Dr Andrew Burton-Jones, Professor of Business Information Systems, University of Queensland

Abstract:

Outcomes from using information systems can vary widely depending on how effectively they are used. Nonetheless, past research offers very few insights on what it means to use an information system effectively. What little research exists has been confined to a single level of analysis (e.g., individual or group). We provide the first multilevel account, derived from a qualitative case study of the use of an electronic health record system, coupled with insights from research on effective use and affordances.

Our study confirms the importance of some aspects of effective use highlighted in prior single-level theories, such as ensuring data accuracy, but it also reveals new aspects needed in a multilevel setting, especially the role of consistency and the role of reflective practice in achieving the ‘right’ accuracy and consistency. Our theory contributes by providing the first multilevel account of what effective use looks like in an organisation and by extending research on effective use, affordance actualisation, and multilevel theory.

Bio:

Andrew Burton-Jones is Professor of Business Information Systems at the University of Queensland Business School. He conducts research on the analysis, design, and use of information systems and on research methodology.

Professor Burton-Jones has published his work in top journals and conferences and has served on the editorial boards of MIS Quarterly, Information Systems Research, and the Journal of the Association for Information Systems.

 He received his BCom (Hons) and Master of Information Systems from UQ, his PhD from Georgia State University, and served as an Assistant and Associate Professor with tenure at the University of British Columbia before returning to UQ.

 Prior to his academic career, he was a senior consultant in a Big-4 accounting/consulting firm.

Hosted by the School of Information Management. Seating is limited; RSVP to nicole.green@vuw.ac.nz to secure your seat.

Jobs after Coal: A Just Transition for Coal Mining Communities

Date: 22 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

Speaker: Jeanette Fitzsimons, former Co-Leader of the Green Pary Aotearoa New Zealand

Background:

Coal mining communities in New Zealand have recently faced major disruption, uncertainty and job losses as the industry suffers from falling prices, competition from renewable energy and mounting concern at the threat of climate change.

Globally and locally, we are on the brink of a transition from the old economy, based on fossil fuels, to a new future based on clean, renewable energy. Yet many hold on to the old for fear of job losses that will leave communities with a shattered economy and no options.

A recent report by Coal Action Network Aotearoa (CANA) argues that the role of coal in New Zealand's economy is small; there are many options for jobs in the industries that will replace coal; skills of coal miners are transferable to other industries, and communities can reinvent themselves to regain a new prosperity after coal.

However, these positive outcomes depend on recognising the need for a proper and effective transition path and setting up a planned process within the community itself, including all stakeholders, with support from central and local government.

Bio:

Jeanette Fitzsimons is a former co-leader of the Green party and a former lecturer in Environmental Studies at the University of Auckland. She retired from Parliament in early 2010 and since then has been working on climate change issues, particularly the need to phase-out coal mining and use, and stop extreme exploration for additional fossil fuels. She is co-author of Jobs After Coal: A just transition for coal mining communities (by CANA).

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; limited to 150 seats with opportunity for discussion afterwards.

MBIE’s Regional Tourism Statistics & Tourism Sector Outlook

Date: 21 May 2014

Time: 12.15 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speakers: Rebecca Burson & Vij Kooyela, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Background:

Vij and Rebecca will discuss recent improvements to MBIE’s tourism data suite that address priorities identified in the Tourism Domain Plan. They will discuss the use of administrative data -- in this case, electronic card transactions -- in the development of the Regional Tourism Indicators (RTIs) and its combination with other data sources to produce the Regional Tourism Estimates (RTEs). Following a brief discussion on methodology, Vij and Rebecca will demonstrate the use of both measures to provide detailed, regionally specific insight into tourist spending behaviour.

The seminar will close with an overview of the Tourism forecasts, the process for which was substantially improved last year to incorporate industry feedback through the establishment of a technical committee. Subsequently, MBIE received positive feedback on the tourism forecasts. MBIE is continuing to use the same process for the 2014-2020 tourism forecasts, due to be released in August 2014.

Bio:

Vij Kooyela joined MBIE in February 2013 from the Labour Federation. She has a Masters in Applied Statistics from Massey University and a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Statistics from Mumbai University. She has 11 years of experience in the New Zealand public sector and has worked mostly in quantitative research, data analysis and report writing roles. The areas that Vij has worked in are skills, productivity, labour market analysis, education, Maori economic development, and forecasting and modelling of social welfare benefits. In MBIE, she project managed the Regional Tourism Estimates project which was released on MBIE’s website in August 2013. Aside from that, Vij has worked on the development of the Tourism Forecasts and the Regional Economic Activity Report.

Rebecca Burson joined MBIE in February 2013. She has a PhD in Psychology and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology from Victoria University of Wellington. Since joining MBIE, Rebecca has contributed to a variety of tourism products, including the International Visitor Survey and the Regional Tourism Indicators. Rebecca also worked on the 2013 Sector Report series and the Small Business Report, due for release in June this year.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Keeping Government Secrets in the Information Age

Date: 16 May 2014

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: NZICA Conference Centre, Level 7, Tower Building, Customhouse Quay, Wellington.

Speaker: Professor Alasdair Roberts, Suffolk University Law School & ANZSOG Visiting Scholar

  • Moderator: Professor Jonathan Boston, Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies
  • Programme: 12.00-12.30pm (registration and light refreshments); 12.30-1.45pm (presentation with Q&A)

Abstract:

Has the digital revolution made it easier or harder for governments to keep secrets? The controversies over WikiLeaks and the Snowden disclosures might make us think we live in a new age of transparency. The reality is more complicated. In many ways, technological change has actually complicated the task of monitoring government. We should not underestimate the capacity of governments to react forcefully against transparency initiatives that threaten vital state interests.

Bio:

Alasdair Roberts is the Jerome L. Rappaport Professor of Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School, Boston, USA. He is the author of Blacked Out: Government Secrecy in the Information Age (Cambridge University Press). Professor Roberts is a Fellow of the US National Academy of Public Administration and co-editor of the journal Governance.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and the Australia and New Zealand School of Government. There is no charge but you do need to register for a ticket.

Technocrats or Populists: Who Gained Influence During the Global Financial crisis?

Date: 14 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT4)

Speaker: Professor Alasdair Roberts, Jerome Lyle Rappaport Chair in Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School & ANZSOG Visiting Scholar

Abstract:

Before the crash of 2008, the liberalised global economy was regarded as a triumph of technocratic policy making. At first it seemed that the crash itself would undermine the credibility and influence of technocrats in central banks and other key institutions; however, events have not followed the path of earlier crises such as the Great Depression of the 1930s.

The global financial crisis has revealed the enduring power of technocrats and the limits of popular protest against the effects of neoliberal economic reforms.

Bio:

Alasdair Roberts is the Jerome L. Rappaport Professor of Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School, Boston, USA. He is the author of The Logic of Discipline: Global Capitalism and the Architecture of Government (Oxford University Press). Professor Roberts is a Fellow of the US National Academy of Public Administration and co-editor of the journal Governance.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz. Venue is limited to 85 seats.

Better Public Engagement Intelligence in the Age of Big Data in New Zealand: Kiwis' Online Privacy Behaviours Under The Microscope

Date: 13 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

Speaker: Professor Miriam Lips, Chair in e-Government, School of Government

Background:

This public seminar will introduce the work of the New Zealand Data Futures Forum to date and explore the challenges and opportunities for developing better public engagement intelligence in the light of recent research findings on how Kiwis manage their identity information in online relationships with government and the private sector, and on social networking sites.

Bio:

Professor Miriam Lips is the inaugural Chair in e-Government at Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Government, and the Programme Director of a new e-Government Master’s programme at Victoria University. Her Chair is sponsored by Datacom Systems Ltd, Department of Internal Affairs and FX Networks Ltd.

Prior to moving to New Zealand, Miriam held academic positions at the University of Oxford and Tilburg University. She is currently a Member of the NZ Data Futures Forum. Miriam’s research concentrates more generally on the introduction, management and use of ICTs in the public sector and its external relationships with society, and the managerial, governmental and democratic implications.

Current research topics include the management of citizen identity information; cross-government information-sharing and privacy; service transformation; the use of social media for effective online engagement; and the management of electronic public records.

Hosted by the Chair in e-Government. All welcome; please register your interest at e-government@vuw.ac.nz, or phone the Chair administrator Lynn Barlow on 04 463 6966.

Hit or Miss? Test Taking Behaviour in Multiple Choice Exams

Date: 12 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Floor, RHMZ 05

Speaker: Assistant Professor James Key, Business School, University of Western Australia

Abstract:

This paper models and estimates students' decision to guess/attempt or skip the question in a multiple choice test in order to understand the role that student characteristics play. We do this using data from the Turkish University Entrance Exam, a highly competitive, high stakes exam. In particular, we investigate students' behaviour according to their gender, predicted score and experience in the exam.

Our results show that students' attitudes towards risk differ according to their gender, predicted score and exam experience: female students behave in a more risk averse manner relative to male students, and high scoring students are more risk averse. However our counterfactual analysis suggests that although different, testing regimes can lead to different score distributions, the relationships between exam score percentiles and student characteristics are relatively invariant.

Bio:

Dr Key joined the University of Western Australia in 2013, having completed his PhD in Economics from the Pennsylvania State University in 2013. Prior to his doctoral studies, he studied Chemistry, Economics and Finance at Victoria University of Wellington. His research interests include international trade, growth and development, and education.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Do Oaths of Office Trigger Social Behaviour? An Experimental Analysis of Institutionalised Promises

Date: 9 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11, Meeting room RH 1113

Speaker: Professor Uwe Dulleck, QUT Business School, Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Abstract:

Codes of conduct and oaths of office are widely used in practice, but surprisingly little research has been done on their effect on human behaviour. In this study we analyse the commitment effect of these institutionalised promises. By a lab experiment we tie in with existing experimental studies on the effect of promises. Rather than looking on one-to-one interactions, like the previous studies, we examine the effect of promises in a social dilemma situation over time. Our promise is addressed to a group, institutionalised and valid for a period of time.

Our results suggest that if a institution gives the voluntary option to subscribe to a code of conduct the more social individuals self-select themselves into the option. But the commitment leads in addition to a longer maintenance of social behaviour of the oath-takers.

Bio:

Professor Uwe Dulleck obtained his PhD at Humboldt University Berlin in 1999, and before joining QUT was a Professor of Economics at the University of Linz, Austria and an Assistant Professor at the University of Vienna. He was recently appointed as one of three editors of Economic Analysis and Policy, Queensland’s leading Economics journal. His research has been discussed in the Economic Focus of The Economist and the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung (the Sunday edition of Germany’s leading quality newspaper).

Uwe was awarded an ARC Linkage Grant in 2008 and is co-investigator of two Austrian Research grants, totalling more than €500,000 (AUD 800,000).

Research in Progress

  • A General Solution to Multiple "Winner-takes-all" games (with Paul Frijters und Konrad Podczeck)
  • Misdiagnosis in Markets for Credence Goods – Satisfaction Guaranteed and other Remedies (with Rudolf Kerschbamer)

Research Interests

  • Information Economics, especially Credence Goods
  • Applied Game Theory
  • Behavioural Experimental Economics

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Earnings Co-movements and Earnings Management

Date: 9 May 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Andrew Jackson, University of New South Wales.

Abstract:

Using a sample of SEC enforcement actions, we show a marked decline in the co-movement of earnings with market level earnings for firms that clearly manipulated their financial statements. This is consistent with a number of theories that predict firms will be more likely to manipulate financial reports when investors learn less about their earnings from other firms. We then confirm that firms who are more likely to have manipulated earnings to meet certain earnings thresholds have lower co-movement of earnings.

Using the F-score from Dechow et al. (2011) as a proxy for earnings management, we expand our analysis to a more general setting and find co-movements are capable of explaining variation in the probability of earnings management. The results on earnings co-movements are in addition to returns based measures of co-movements including betas and downside betas thus indicating accounting based measures of co-movements have an important relationship with earnings management.

Bio:

Andrew joined the Australian School of Business in July 2005 and was appointed Senior Lecturer in July 2011 teaching postgraduate financial accounting. Prior to his appointment at UNSW, Andrew taught at Victoria University. His research interests include corporate disclosure, stock return volatility, the timeliness of earnings and asset pricing models.

He has published in journals such as Abacus, Accounting and Finance, Australian Accounting Review, Australian Journal of Management, Managerial Auditing Journal, and has reviewed for a number of international journals and conferences. He has served on the technical committee of the AFAANZ Annual Conference for the last two years. His paper, 'Pierpont and the Capital Market' was awarded a joint share of the Abacus 2009 Manuscript Award.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Emerging Trends That Could Shape the Future of Tourist Behaviour

Date: 7 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 5, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Ian Yeoman, Tourism Management Group, School of Management

Abstract: 

We know about the core trends that are shaping tourist behaviour and society, whether it is an ageless society or the green consumer. What about emerging trends? Those trends that are been acted out by early adopters which will be of significance in the medium to long term whether it is the gamification of price or the human computer.

Using the process of trends analysis and drawing upon the latest global omnibus consumer data, Dr Ian Yeoman speculates on emerging trends, evidence from today and likely impact on the tourism industry of the future.

Background:

Dr Ian Yeoman is a specialist travel and tourism futurologist who believes in Star Trek, is an eternal optimist, crazy about Sunderland AFC and enjoys cooking. Ian is a trainee Professor at Victoria University of Wellington who commutes and holidays around the world.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee and tea will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

People, Productivity and High Performance

Date: 6 May 2014

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: Intercontinental Hotel, 2 Grey Street, Lambton Rooms One & Two,

Speaker: Professor Deborah Blackman, Professor of Public Sector Management Strategy, University of NSW, Canberra and Visiting Professor at the Australia and New Zealand School of Government

Moderator & second speaker: Jacki Couchman, Acting Chief Talent Officer, State Services Commission

Background:

As government budgets shrink and pressures on public services mount, the words 'performance' and 'productivity' are frequently heard. But do any of us find addressing problems of performance and productivity in our workplaces easy? And what do we mean by high performance at an individual, agency and whole of system level?

You are warmly invited to engage with two outstanding speakers from both sides of the Tasman to grapple with how we change the performance conversation, work out what our priorities are, and make the connection between motivation, management and a high performing state sector.

Bio:

Professor Blackman's academic background is in human management and development as well as change management and organisational behaviour. A common theme of her work is managing knowledge to improve organisational effectiveness. She recently developed a new Performance Management Framework with the Australian Public Service Commission which focuses on achieving high performance in addition to extensively publishing in a range of international journals.

Co-hosted by the Australia and New Zealand School of Governance, the State Services Commission, and the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies.

This is a free seminar but bookings are essential. Please register here and if you have any difficulties, email appliedlearning@anzsog.edu.au.

Do Good Starts Make Good Finishes? The Case of CEO Pay

Date: 2 May 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11 Meeting Room (RH 1113)

Speaker: Dr Helena Cimerova, Postdoctoral Researcher, AUT University

Abstract:

We study the effects of job market conditions at the start of future CEOs' careers. We find no evidence of persistent rewards for US public firms' CEOs for starting their career in more successful firms, or for the luck of entering the job market in a good economy.

Rather, we show that long-term effects are countercyclical as those executives who start their careers in a recession earn a higher CEO pay, consistent with selection. We also find that initial job conditions may yield a higher first CEO compensation but the positive effect dissipates over time. While related labor market research points to procyclical cohort effects and suggests that favorable initial conditions positively affect careers in the long run, our findings support the notion that the market for CEOs is efficient.

Bio:

Dr Helena Cimerova is a Postdoctoral Researcher at AUT University. Her qualifications consist of a PhD in Finance (with honours), Nova School of Business and Economics, Lisbon, Portugal and Masters in Finance and in Pedagogy and Economic Education (double diploma, with honours), University of Economics in Bratislava, Slovakia.

Dr Cimerova’s research areas include empirical corporate finance, corporate governance and CEO compensation. Her current research projects include CEO compensation in cross-listed companies; cultural diversity on boards; executive incentives and their long-term impact on the economy.

Publications include "Do the Initial Job Market Conditions Really Matter for CEO Pay?" (2011, working paper); "CEO Compensation and Experience" (2010, working paper); "The Influence of CEO Experience and Education on Firm Policies" (2009, working paper).

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Environment and Climate Change

Date: 15 April 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

Speaker: Dr Christina Hood, Senior Climate Policy Analyst, International Energy Agency (IEA)

Background:

The IEA is an autonomous organisation which works to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for its 28 member countries and beyond. The IEA's four main areas of focus are: energy security, economic development, environmental awareness, and engagement worldwide.

The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference will be held in Paris, where Dr Hood is based with the IEA. The objective of the 2015 conference is to achieve for the first time in over 20 years of UN negotiations, a binding and universal agreement on climate from all the nations of the world, including the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases.

The goal of the conference is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to limit the global temperature increase to two degrees celcius above current levels. Dr Christina Hood will be in New Zealand to help raise awareness in the lead up to the conference.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome but the venue is limited to 150 seats, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Digitization in the Norwegian Government: Current Status and Key Issues for Realising the Digital-by-Default Strategy

Date: 15 April 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Old Government Building, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Speaker: Dr Leif Skiftenes Flak, Department of Information Systems, University of Agder (Norway)

Background:

Dr Leif Skiftenes Flak is Head of the Department of Information Systems at the University of Agder (UiA), Norway. Prior to being Head of Department, he chaired the research group on e-Government at UiA. He holds a PhD in computer science from Aalborg University.

Dr Flak’s research interests are on e-Government in general with emphasis on stakeholder related issues and benefits management in particular. His work has been widely published in information systems and e-Government journals and conference proceedings. 

He has served as a board member of the Norwegian network of e-Government researchers, is a member of several international interest groups and associations, and is involved in various e-Government research and practice projects in Norway.

Hosted by the Chair in e-Government. All welcome; please register your interest at e-government@vuw.ac.nz, or phone the Chair administrator Lynn Barlow on 04 463 6966.

Indigenous Peoples and Disasters: Opportunities and Obligations of Efficiency

Date: 11 April 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11 Meeting Room (RH1113)

Speaker: Dr Simon Lambert, Faculty of Environment, Society & Design, Lincoln University

Background:

Dr Lambert lectures in Māori environmental planning and development. He has previously held a Te Tipu Pūtaiao post-doctoral fellowship at LandCare Research Ltd, and has researched small-scale innovation in the farming, building and energy sectors of New Zealand in the Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit on Lincoln campus.

He is particularly interested in Māori farming as recorded through the history of the Te Ahuwhenua Trophy and is also researching indigenous economies, particularly how Indigenous Peoples engage with innovation. His current research is on the affects of the recent Canterbury earthquakes on Māori communities.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Systems Change in the Manufacturing Sector: Innovation and Access to Technologies for Sustainable Development

Date: 11 April 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: The Treasury, 1 The Terrace, Level 5, Rooms 510-511

Speaker: Dr Kira Matus, Assistant Professor in Public Policy and Management, London School of Economics

Abstract:

The sustainability of the industrial economic model of production and consumption is increasingly coming into question. This presentation will explore the development and dissemination of 'green technologies' in the manufacturing sector, and how existing institutional arrangements, particularly those involving transnational actors, can be strengthened to improve the impact of innovation on sustainable development.

Bio:

Dr Matus received her PhD in Public Policy from Harvard University in 2009 and is now the co-Director of the Harvard University Sustainability Science Program's 'Innovation and Access to Technologies for Sustainable Development project' as well as Assistant Professor of Public Management at the London School of Economics.

Her research focuses on the application of innovative technology to address sustainable development. This includes exploring the potential of green chemistry as a so-called leapfrog technology, namely in the United States, India and China. She is also doing research on voluntary regulation, especially the role of standards and certification, in the development of green technologies.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

We acknowledge and thank The Treasury for their support; venue limited to 60 seats.

Effects of the XBRL Mandate on the Value Relevance of Earnings Management

Date: 11 April 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Sandip Dhole, University of Melbourne

Abstract:

In 2009, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) made it mandatory for firms to file interactive data using XBRL along with their 10-K and 10-Q reports on EDGAR. There was an initial three-year phase-in period, with the first (last) phase covering the largest (smallest) firms in the US capital markets. We examine how the mandatory requirement of XBRL filing by US companies affected the value relevance of earnings and the extent of accounting and real earnings management. Our results indicate that there is no reliable change in the value relevance of earnings, on average, after XBRL became mandatory.

However, separate analyses reveal that there is a significant improvement in the value relevance of earnings of the Phase 3 filers. We also find no change in the extent of accounting earnings management, on average, after the mandatory adoption of XBRL. Additional tests, however, suggest that these results are primarily driven by the Phase 3 filers. We find strong evidence that both Phase 1 and Phase 2 filers experienced significant decline in the extent of accounting earnings management after XBRL became mandatory. We also find an increase in the extent of real earnings management (driven by the Phase 2 and Phase 3 filers) after XBRL became mandatory, suggesting that firms increasingly resort to real earnings management after the mandatory requirement of filing interactive data. We also find that the mandate has not improved the value relevance of the earnings of firms with high institutional shareholders incrementally over that of smaller firms.

Bio:

Dr Sandip Dhole joined the Department of Accounting at the Faculty of Business and Economics (University of Melbourne) after working as an Assistant Professor for three years at the Indian School of Business. He obtained his PhD from the University of Houston in 2010. The main focus of Sandip’s research is financial reporting.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Authoring, De-Authoring and Authorisation

Date: 9 April 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Alex Wright, Open University, UK

Abstract:

This presentation adopts a communication that is constitutive of organisation (CCO) lens to examine how strategy consultants' texts claim authority. Six texts constructed during a longitudinal study of strategy consultancy/client inter-relating are investigated to discern how authorisation is exercised through and by texts.

Two contributions are claimed. First, how an external actor-perspective of strategy highlights how the object called 'strategy' is an authorised construct that requires the authoritative hand(s) of internal and external author(s) to emerge. The ubiquitous consultants' report is reframed as a defensive text whose purpose is to present a preferred view of organisational strategy as calm, sequential and ordered. Second, CCO understandings are extended by explicating how the authority necessary for organisation to unfold is claimed and assigned through textual authoring, de-authoring and authorisation.

Bio:

Dr Alex Wright is a lecturer in strategic management in the Department of Strategy and Marketing at The Open University Business School, UK. His research interests focus on strategy-as-practice, which views strategising as a sociolinguistic construction constituted by strategists.

He is also involved in research on organisational routines as communicative constructions, communication as constitutive of organisation, the social production of organising spaces, and performativity.

Hosted by the School of Management. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Presentation of Asian Development Outlook 2014 Report

Date: 7 April 2014

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Speaker: Ms Emma Veve, Principal Economist, Asian Development Bank Pacific Department

Background:

Asian Development Bank's flagship economic publication Asian Development Outlook 2014 provides a comprehensive analysis of macroeconomic issues in developing Asia and the Pacific, with growth projections by country and region.

This year's special theme chapter, "Fiscal Policy for Inclusive Growth", explores how fiscal policy -- both public spending and revenue mobilisation -- can be used to promote inclusive growth.

While developing Asia has made huge strides in reducing poverty, the last two decades have seen income inequality widening, driven by the same forces of globalisation, technological progress, and market-oriented reform that accelerated the region’s rapid growth.

In response, the region’s citizens are calling on their governments to play a more active role in bringing about a fairer society, one that provides opportunities for all and distributes the fruits of growth widely.

The Asian Development Bank's Pacific Department Principal Economist Emma Veve will address these issues and others at a special presentation of the Asian Development Outlook 2014. Ms. Veve will present the key findings of the report and address questions including:

  • What has been the role of fiscal policy in promoting inclusion in Asia and the Pacific?
  • What does cross-country empirical evidence show on the effectiveness of fiscal spending on reducing inequality?
  • Do Asian countries have adequate fiscal space for more inclusion-enhancing spending programs?
  • What should be the target sources for greater revenue mobilization with least adverse effects on growth and how do the priorities differ across countries?
  • How can a medium-term fiscal framework incorporate equity within the broad confine of fiscal sustainability?

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. RSVP to Ingrid.Watts@vuw.ac.nz by Monday 31 March 2014.

The Post-Crisis Financial Regulatory Agenda: An Illustrated Guide

Date: 2 April 2014

Time: 11.30 am

Venue: Old Government Building, Level 1, Lecture Theatre 4 (GBLT4)

Speaker: Professor Julia Black, Director of the Law and Financial Markets Project, London School of Economics and Victoria University of Wellington's 2014 Sir Frank Holmes Fellow

Abstract:

The global regulatory agenda has been rapidly evolving in the last five years. This lecture outlines the key elements of that unfolding agenda, emphasising the themes of transparency, resilience and resolution. Professor Black will also discuss the tensions between the global and national interests in regulating financial markets.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required, but venue is limited to 85 seats; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Regulating Really Responsively

Date: 28 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: The Treasury, 1 The Terrace, Level 5, Rooms 510-511

Speaker: Professor Julia Black, London School of Economics, and 2014 Sir Frank Holmes Fellow

Background:

Professor Julia Black has written extensively on regulatory issues in a number of areas and has advised policy makers, consumer bodies and regulators on issues of institutional design and regulatory policy.

Bio:

Julia Black is the Pro Director for Research at the London School of Economics and her principal research interest is to explore the nature, dynamics and legitimacy of regulatory regimes, both state and non-state.

With a speciality in financial services regulation and the regulation of risk particularly in public law and biotechnology, it is an honour to have her visit New Zealand as the 2014 Sir Frank Holmes Visiting Professor in Public Policy at Victoria University of Wellington.

Co-hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, the Government Economic Network and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. All welcome and no RSVP required, but this venue is limited to 150 seats. Email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Media Sentiment, Investor Sentiment, and Stock Price Sensitivity to Earnings

Date: 28 March 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Chen Chen, University of Auckland Business School

Abstract:

While prior research has focused on investor sentiment at the market level, we propose and test a measure of firm-specific investor sentiment. Specifically, we focus on the optimism and pessimism embedded in news items about the firm. Using data from Thomson Reuters News Analytics which uses a linguistic analysing engine to rate news items in real-time, we create a firm-specific measure of investor sentiment - i.e. media sentiment - by stripping out the portion of the news rating that is related to firm fundamentals.

After controlling for market-wide investor sentiment, we find that when firm-specific media sentiment is positive (negative), investors overreact to positive (negative) earnings surprises. Further, we find that this effect is concentrated in hard to value firms and cannot be explained by information contained in our sentiment measure.

Our results suggest that the tone of news items can contribute to the misvaluation of stocks, and this effect is incremental to market-wide investor sentiment.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Community and Voluntary Sector Research Forum

Date: 25 March 2014

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level 5, RWW 501

  • Joany Grima (Project Manager for the biennial Commonwealth People’s Forum ): Volunteer impact and management at New Zealand sporting events
  • Rodney Dormer (Victoria Business School): Whanau ora and the collaborative turn
  • Farzana Tanima (Victoria Business School): Microfinance and women’s empowerment in Bangladesh: A study of competing logics and their implications for accounting and accountability systems

A number of academics at Victoria University research in, and for, the community and voluntary sector, with many of our postgraduate students also researching in this area.

As well as networking within the University, this research is shared with the community through regular Community and Voluntary Sector Research (CVSR) Forums

The forums run from 3.00-5.00pm, with tea and coffee available from 2.45pm. They are held in Railway West Wing 501 (use the Victoria University door on the left hand side of the Station, then take the first lift to the 5th floor or one of the other lifts to the 4th floor and walk up a flight of stairs). General public are most welcome to attend these regular seminars.

Document File size File type
CVSR Forum Flyer (March 2014)  500 KB PDF

Three of a Kind? The Emissions Trading Systems of the EU, New Zealand and Tokyo Compared

Date: 21 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Station, Level Five, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Stefan Niederhafner, Department of Political Science & International Relations, Seoul National University, South Korea

Abstract:

Even though the EU emission trading system (ETS) is the biggest and most active carbon market, it has apparent problems maintaining a stable supply and demand based price mechanism which calls into question its purpose of reducing C0₂emissions. The same problem occurs in New Zealand where prices have fallen dramatically over the past couple of years.

Comparing the carbon markets of the EU, New Zealand and Tokyo, Dr Niederhafner will investigate the differences in the designs of the systems, asking if elements can be found that would make carbon trading an actual C0₂mitigating enterprise.

Bio:

Dr Stefan Niederhafner’s research interests focus mainly on governance in multi-level systems with a special focus on the role of the local level, transnational networks, as well as of energy and climate change politics.

At undergraduate level, he teaches courses on European Integration and the EU system. On graduate level, he offers courses on EU’s foreign policy as well as global energy and environmental politics with a focus on climate change.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Tourism Development in Timor-Leste: Aspirations of International Standards

Date: 19 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Trisha Dwyer, MTM graduant

Abstract:

"Timor-Leste is blessed with tropical waters rich in marine life, white sand beaches, spectacular mountain ranges, unique Timorese culture, Portuguese colonial heritage and resistance history"

Timor-Leste’s National Strategic Development Plan (2011-2030) identifies tourism as a pathway to economic development, creating jobs and alleviating poverty. For a post-conflict society with a fledgling tourism industry, the plan to develop a sustainable tourism destination is full of great aspirations and major challenges. Building the capacity of the tourism and hospitality workforce is a priority area.

The new qualifications framework for vocational training is based on international tourism industry standards. How relevant and effective can the training be, when such standards and aspirations are far from the current reality of Timor-Leste?

Bio:

Trisha Dwyer worked as a tourism and hospitality training adviser in Timor-Leste through Volunteer Service Abroad (VSA). She holds a Master of Tourism Management from Victoria University and has extensive experience in tourism operations and training in Latin America, Asia and the Pacific.

Hosted by the School of Management / Tourism Management Group. Coffee will be served following this seminar, no RSVP required.

Environmental Policy Effectiveness in New Zealand: Inside the Black Box

Date: 14 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Building, Level Five, RWW 501

Speaker: Dr Hugh Logan, environmental management and policy consultant

Abstract:

New Zealand was a rapid innovator in environmental policy during the late 1980s and early 1990s, but since then has been slow to develop policies to address environmental problems; this despite having comparatively strong central government capacity and the power to move quickly in terms of policy development.

Dr Logan will discuss some of his recent PhD research on the study of how environmental policy did or didn't develop within government to address the significant issues of fragmented oceans management, native biodiversity decline and freshwater quality decline.

The findings offer up valuable lessons for aspiring policy makers, which together with Dr Logan's extensive experience within the public sector makes this lecture an insightful must-attend.

Bio:

Since completing an MA (first class honours) at Canterbury University, Hugh Logan has spent nearly 30 years working in the public sector. His many and varied roles have included running what is now Antarctica NZ (previously the Antarctic Division of DSIR) from 1988 to 1991, Director General of DOC from 1997 to 2006, and CEO of the Ministry for the Environment from 2006 to 2008.

He chose the Department of Environmental Management at Lincoln for his PhD because he wanted to study at an institution that had connections to environmental management and land based issues. His thesis, entitled "Inside the black box: The influence of government executive forces on environmental policy effectiveness in New Zealand", explored the multitude of internal factors that affect environmental management practices in this country.

The intention of this study was to illuminate the effect of these internal forces in order to help the formulation of successful environmental policy and action in the future.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome & no RSVP required, but limited to 65 seats. Email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

A Comparison of Tax Professionals' Perception of Large and Mid-Size Business Tax Law Complexity

Date: 14 March 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

Speaker: Dr Stewart Karlinsky, Professor Emeritus, San Jose State University

Abstract:

Tax Complexity represents one of the most insidious problems facing taxpayers. For example, the US tax law and regulations contains more than 17,000 pages. The effect of this complexity has a significant cost to both taxpayers and the government by creating annual compliance costs. As the tax code becomes more complex, these cost rise as well. In addition, the complexity may distort taxpayer planning and actions. Maybe the most important cost that complexity engenders is the frequent errors by the IRS and taxpayers, and the tangentially related non-compliance (‘tax gap’) with the tax law.

Based on prior research, the impact of tax law complexity should not be overlooked. The current study concentrates on issues related to large and mid-sized businesses. We surveyed both tax directors for large corporations as well as managers and partners of international accounting and law firms to gage their perception of tax law complexity for 40 different issues. The results show that five of the top ten most complex issues involved the international tax arena. Interestingly, issues perceived as very complex in prior studies, such as Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) and depreciation, were not found to be very complex in the context of large companies. This study also tested the differences in perceptions of two groups of participants based on both number of years in practice and whether they worked as outside consultants or within the internal tax department. There were significant differences for some of the tax issues, but for a majority of issues, there were not significant differences.

Bio:

Dr Stewart S. Karlinsky (PhD, MBA, CPA) is Professor Emeritus and was formerly Professor of Taxation and Graduate Tax Director at San Jose State University.

Dr Karlinsky teaches, writes, and speaks in the international tax, corporate, individual, real estate, alternative minimum tax, S corporation, reorganizations, tax policy, and closely held business tax areas. He has lectured extensively to various professional accounting organizations (AICPA, TEI, California CPA), accounting firms (PWC, Deloitte, KPMG, BDO, Ernst & Young, and McGladrey Pullen), and commercial and investment bankers (Bear Stearns, Bank of America, City National Bank, Harris Bank & Bank of Hawaii). He has been an expert witness for both prosecution and defense, and testified before Congress on AMT.

Dr Karlinsky has published over 80 articles in both professional and academic journals, and is the author of The Complete Guide to ALTERNATIVE MINIMUM TAX: 2000-1. He has taught international tax, tax policy and comparative tax systems in United Kingdom, France, Austria, Portugal, Australia, and Ireland, and is a Senior Fellow at Monash University’s Taxation Law and Policy Research Institute.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Science and Public Policy

Date: 7 March 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Railway Station, Level Five, RWW 501

Speaker: Professor Martin Lodge, London School of Economics & ANZSOG Visiting Scholar

Abstract:

The relationship between science and politics is a contested one. The notion of 'science-based' policy appeals to those favouring the idea of rational policy-making. However, 'science based' policy fails to acknowledge the different roles that 'science' plays when it comes to policy and politics. Furthermore, it also does not acknowledge the conflicts within 'science' itself.

This paper explores this debate by looking at the most extensive and expansive random control trial in the UK, namely the trial involving badgers in the context of concern about the rise of TB in cattle. The paper highlights the highly problematic nature of the notion of a 'science-based' policy.

Bio:

Martin Lodge joined the LSE Government Department in September 2002. Previously he was ESRC Senior Research Officer at the LSE's Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation (CARR) and Lecturer in Public Policy at the University of Ulster at Jordanstown. His undergraduate and PhD degrees are from the LSE.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

Towards a Precariat Charter

Date: 26 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)

Speaker: Dr Guy Standing, Professor of Development Studies, University of London

Abstract:

Recurrent themes of Professor Standing’s research, often drawing on extensive household and workplace surveys, have been the insecurities faced by workers in the wake of reforms of labour law, labour regulation and social protection, and the rationale for moving towards unconditional income transfers.

Professor Standing is returning to NZ in 2014 to undertake a series of lectures based on his new book, A Precariat Charter: From Denizens to Citizens, to be published in April 2014. This book describes an emerging class characterised by insecurity and lack of any occupational identity, and focuses on 'what can be done'.

His visit in 2013 created a great deal of interest and discussion of the theses presented in his 2011 book, The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class.

Bio:

Guy Standing is Professor of Development Studies at SOAS, University of London, and a founder and co-President of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN), an NGO promoting basic income as a right.

He has held chairs at the Universities of Bath and Monash (Australia) and was previously Director of the Socio-Economic Security Programme of the International Labour Organisation. He is currently working on pilot basic income schemes in India. A full resume is available here »

Hosted by the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (previously the Industrial Relations Centre) as part of their 2013 Lunchtime Seminar.

Tea and coffee will be available and you are welcome to bring your lunch; there is no charge for the seminar and no RSVP is required.

Preparing for 2015: An Update for Charities

Date: 26 February 2014

Time: 8.15 am

Venue: Old Government Buildings, Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1)

Building on the successful Not-for-Profit Sector Conference in 2012, this occasional Not-for-Profit Seminar Series addresses current issues of relevance to the sector.

Background:

The Financial Reporting Act has recently passed, bringing a new regulatory framework, new reporting responsibilities and opportunities.

The Accounting Infrastructure Reform Bill also proposes that registered charities with annual operating expenditure of $500,000 or more be required to have the financial statements they file with their annual returns assured by a qualified accountant.

The Department of Internal Affairs is to be tasked with monitoring compliance with these requirements.

This seminar will cover:

  • What changes have occurred in the regulation of charities and what reporting and assurance responsibilities will it bring?
  • What specific steps can you undertake now to prepare for the changes to your financial statements for 2015?
  • Revenue generation strategies – highlights and pitfalls identified from charities’ financial statements.
  • A look across the Tasman – what can we learn?

Programme and registration details (cost $60 excl GST) are available from the NFP Seminar Series pages.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Beth Goodwin, Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment
  • Brendon Ward, General Manager, Charities, Department of Internal Affairs
  • Carolyn Cordery, Member, NZ Accounting Standards Board and Senior Lecturer, School of Accounting and Commercial Law
  • Kevin Simpkins, Chair External Reporting Board, and Adjunct Professor, School of Accounting and Commercial Law
  • Stewart Donaldson, Australian Charities and Not-for-Profit Commission (ex-NZ Charities Commission and IRD

Hosted by the Centre for Accounting, Governance and Taxation Research.

 

Strategic Expectations: Fictitious Play in a Model of Rationally Heterogeneous Expectations

Date: 25 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 12 Boardroom

Speaker: Dr Christopher Gibbs, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales

Background:

Christopher Gibbs is currently a Lecturer at University of New South Wales (Australian School of Business), School of Economics. His field of expertise is in Macroeconomics, learning and expectations and time series econometrics.

Christopher is currently working on the following papers:

  1. The Real Forecasting Advantage of the UC-SV Model of U.S. Ination (2013)
  2. Forecast Combination in the Macroeconomy (2012)
  3. Strategic Expectations: Fictitious Play in a Model of Rationally Heterogeneous Expectations (2012)
  4. Systematic Ination Forecast Errors, Forecast Combination, and the Forecast Combination Puzzle (2012)

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

From Sustainable, Green and Inclusive Growth to Disaster Economics

Date: 21 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Level 11 Meeting Room RH 1113

Speakers: Professor James Roumasset and Dr Kimberly Burnett, Dept of Economics, University of Hawai’i

Abstract:

While the popular version of sustainable development is non-operational at best, sustainable growth in economics rests on three pillars:

  • interlinkages between the economy and the environment
  • intergenerational equity
  • dynamic optimization

We extend this conceptual framework to green and inclusive growth. In order to engage the concerns of disaster management, the same framework must incorporate uncertainty. After reviewing some results from dynamic optimization under uncertainty, we apply catastrophe theory to the problem of invasive species management.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Hermeneutic Tensions in Critical Thinking: The Play of Affirmation and Doubt

Date: 21 February 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 315

Speaker: Professor Ed Arrington, University of Wollongong

Abstract:

Critical accounting research seeks to interpret and explain accounting in a range of ways, all of which embed doubts about accounting and its practices and all of which seek to warrant that doubting through affirmation of some theory (e.g.,Marxist thought); some moral stance (eg, distributive justice), or some episteme or intellectual and discursive style (e.g., constructivism, genealogy, deconstruction). The doubts in critical research run much deeper than the functionalistic doubts of "mainstream" accounting, a body of research which affirms accounting’s service to capital and thus enjoys an interpretive simplicity focussed on how well or poorly accounting carries out its conventional functions (e.g., control of labour; decision usefulness of financial statements). Also, the affirmation of accounting within the mainstream is simply assumed – accounting is viewed as, teleologically and normatively, a practice that should be in the service of particular concepts of the good (e.g., the good of efficiency, of profitability, etc.).

In critical research, affirmation is much more difficult to assume, particularly given the fact that in our post- or late-modern intellectual space we cannot simply "ground" intellectual discourse in a singular theory or singular conception of the good of economy, of society, of morality, or of the "self"). This essay seeks to explore ways in which critical researchers might better interpret and understand the intellectual and practical force of their work as engaged with a "critical hermeneutic" practice of research and scholarship.

Bio:

Professor Ed Arrington came to the School of Accounting and Finance from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. He is a well-known international scholar in critical accounting and moral philosophy, and currently serves on the editorial boards of several top ranked journals in his field including International Journal of Critical Accounting, Society and Business Review, Critical Perspectives on Accounting, and Accounting Forum.

Ed’s interests are in critical social theory and its relation to accounting and organisations, as well as theories of language in the context of commerce and culture.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

Local e-Government Practices in Scandinavia: Challenging Local Autonomy and Regional Characteristics

Date: 19 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Speaker: Professor Elin Wihlborg, Department of Management, Linköping University, Sweden

Background:

Professor Elin Wihlborg holds a PhD in Technology and Social Change and a Master’s degree in Social Policy from London School of Economics. Since 2012 she has been a Professor in Politics at the department of Management, Linköping University and a Marie Curie scholar (2011-14) for research on sustainable e-government.

Professor Wihlborg's own research focuses on e-government, sustainable development and public administration. Her recent publications cover issues like municipal contact centres, local crises management, co-production of local public services and policy entrepreneurs.

Hosted by the Chair in e-Government. All welcome; no registration required.

The Impact of Stronger Property Rights in Pharmaceuticals on Innovation in Developed and Developing Countries

Date: 17 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Mezzanine Level, RHMZ05

Speaker: Professor Sumner La Croix, Department of Economics, University of Hawaii-Manoa

Abstract:

We use dynamic panel data regressions to determine the relation between the strength of a countrys patent protection for pharmaceutical innovations and pharmaceutical patents granted to its residents and corporations by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Patent strength is measured by the Pharmaceutical Intellectual Property Protection (PIPP) Index.

Using panel data from 25 developing and 41 developed countries over the 1970-2004 period, results from dynamic probit and poisson regressions find that stronger patent protection for pharmaceutical innovations has little effect on patent activity in the developing country sample and number of patents granted in the developed country sample.

Bio:

Sumner La Croix is Professor in the Department of Economics Program at the University of Hawai′i-Manoa; and an affiliate faculty member with the UH-Manoa Center for Chinese Studies and the UH-Manoa Center for Japanese Studies. La Croix’s research focuses on the economic history, development, and current state of economies in the Asia-Pacific region, with an emphasis on issues pertaining to institutional change, property rights, intellectual property rights, and organization and regulation of industry. Current research projects include articles on patents and access to essential medicines; China’s rise as an international trading power; racial discrimination in Japanese and American baseball; property rights in land in Dutch South Africa; Chinese out-bound tourism and ADS; and economic education in Hawaii.

La Croix is also revising a book manuscript on the economic history of Hawaii; and is coordinating the Hawaii Census Project, a multi-year venture to publish a database with all records from the 1900-1930 territorial censuses of Hawaii and to use the database to analyze the assimilation of immigrants to Hawaii.

Hosted by the School of Economics and Finance. Tea and coffee will be provided prior to the seminar start, RSVP not required.

Evidence for Agile Policy Makers

Date: 14 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Speaker: Dr Graham Room, Professor of European Social Policy, University of Bath

Abstract:

Advocates of evidence-based policy-making (EBPM) are typically concerned with the impact of particular interventions. This implicit ontology of the policy world, as disaggregated into a variety of independent interventions, has been challanged by Pawson (2006) in terms of the contingencies that activate, inhibit or reshape the impact of any intervention.

This critique does not however go far enough. The potentialities and impact of an intervention are contingent on the synergies that it develops with other interventions. This provides a vantage point for re-considering the theory and practice of EBPM and systematic review.

Bio:

Dr Graham Room is Professor of European Social Policy at the University of Bath. His latest research is concerned with complexity theory and social dynamics and with the implications for policy analysis

Professor Room is author, co-author or editor of twelve books, the most recent being Complexity, Institutions and Public Policy: Agile Decision-Making in a Turbulent World. He is also Acting Director of the Institute for Policy Research, the Founding Editor of the Journal of European Social Policy, and is a member of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Corporate Governance in Islamic Countries

Date: 12 February 2014

Time: 11.00 am

Venue: Railway Building, RWW 315

Speaker: Professor Christine Helliar, University of South Australia Business School

Abstract:

Corporate Governance from a Western perspective is usually about the principal/agent relationship and aligning the incentives of managers with those of shareholders. However in many Islamic countries there are under developed capital markets and most businesses are either family owned or government owned, either directly by the state or through government investment arms. Thus the institutional context of firms in Islamic countries is very different from that of the west and, as such, the governance of these firms should relate to their political, social, historical and legal context.

One feature of an Islamic country is Shariah law, and the Muslim faith that embodies social justice, and how humans are merely trustees for Allah (PBUH) and act as his vice regents on Earth. However, the Islamic concepts of truth, justice and fairness do not seem to operate in business, and thus the governance of firms in practice has decoupled from the practice and embodiment of the Muslim faith.

Bio:

Professor Christine Helliar is the Head of the School of Commerce at the University of South Australia. She previously worked Ernst & Young in London and investment banking in the City at Morgan Stanley, Hong Kong Bank and Citigroup, and has a wide background in accounting, finance and capital markets.

As Director of Research at The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland for six years from 2003-2009, she undertook business relevant research and engagement and I am currently chair of the British Accounting and Finance Association.

Professor Christine Helliar's research includes financial reporting, corporate governance, accounting education, risk, risk management and derivatives, auditing and management control.

Hosted by the School of Accounting and Commercial Law. This seminar will be preceded by morning tea at 10.30am; RSVP to Lee.Vassiliadis@vuw.ac.nz for catering purposes.

'Don't Get Bored' and Other Simple But Important Truths About Unleashing Change in Government

Date: 4 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Speaker: Dr Steven Kelman, Professor of Public Management, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Abstract:

Is it really true that there are three inevitabilities in the life of the public manager? The three being death, taxes and resistance to organisational change.

Drawing on his own personal experience as an administrator and extensive research among frontline civil servants, as well as literature in organisation theory and psychology, Professor Steve Kelman engagingly challenges conventional and pessimistic notions about achieving lasting reform in large organisations.

Professor Kelman is in New Zealand as part of the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) Visiting Scholar programme.

  • Moderator: Professor Brad Jackson, Head of School, School of Government

Bio:

Dr. Steven Kelman is the Weatherhead Professor of Public Management at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard College, with a PhD in government from Harvard University, he is the author of many books and articles on the policymaking process and on improving the management of government organizations.

His latest book, Unleashing Change: A Study of Organizational Change in Government, was published in 2005 by the Brookings Instutition Press. His other books include a study on how to improve the government computer procurement process, entitled Procurement and Public Management: The Fear of Discretion and the Quality of Government Performance (AEI Press, 1990), and Making Public Policy: A Hopeful View of American Government (Basic Books, 1987).

In 1996 he was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. In 2001, he received the Herbert Roback Memorial Award, the highest achievement award of the National Contract Management Association. In 2003 he was elected as a Director of The Procurement Roundtable. In 2010 the American Political Science Association awarded him the Gaus Prize, which honors a lifetime of achievement in public administration scholarship. He currently serves as editor of the International Public Management Journal.

An ANZSOG / SSC / IGPS event, with registration and light refreshments available from 12pm. All welcome and attendance is free, but bookings are essential. Click here to register.

America's Economic and Political Challenges

Date: 3 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 1

Speaker: Dr Steven Kelman, Professor of Public Management, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Abstract:

Professor Kelman's lecture will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the US economy and why the US political system has difficulties solving the country's budget and long term fiscal problems.

Bio:

Dr. Steven Kelman is the Weatherhead Professor of Public Management at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard College, with a PhD in government from Harvard University, he is the author of many books and articles on the policymaking process and on improving the management of government organizations.

His latest book, Unleashing Change: A Study of Organizational Change in Government, was published in 2005 by the Brookings Instutition Press. His other books include a study on how to improve the government computer procurement process, entitled Procurement and Public Management: The Fear of Discretion and the Quality of Government Performance (AEI Press, 1990), and Making Public Policy: A Hopeful View of American Government (Basic Books, 1987).

In 1996 he was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. In 2001, he received the Herbert Roback Memorial Award, the highest achievement award of the National Contract Management Association. In 2003 he was elected as a Director of The Procurement Roundtable. In 2010 the American Political Science Association awarded him the Gaus Prize, which honors a lifetime of achievement in public administration scholarship. He currently serves as editor of the International Public Management Journal.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

Reducing Inequality through Universal Basic Income

Date: 31 January 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3

Speaker: Perce Hapham

Background:

Universal Basic Income (UBI) is an idea whose time may have come. Although the idea of a UBI was first mooted around 1800, the financing of it appears always to have been considered separately. In this IGPS seminar, Perce Harpham will discuss the beginning of a solution by considering both a Universal Basic Income and an Asset Tax to finance it.

By choice of appropriate levels of the variables, Perce will argue that both tax and benefit systems can be simplified and inequality reduced. He will draw on recent examples of innovation in this field; most notably the forthcoming vote in Switzerland, and the advocacy campaign by a Conservative Canadian Senator.

Bio:

Born in Tauranga, Perce graduated as a Chemical Engineer from Canterbury University and worked for Dulux paints for 14 years - being seconded to ICI in England in 1957 and then to the head office in Australia before returning to NZ and progressing through Production Manager to being in charge of setting up and managing Dulux’s computer, the fourth in NZ.

When Britain joined the Common Market he set up the first software company in NZ. It prospered, for 21 years with offices throughout NZ and Australia as well as Chicago, Los Angeles and Beijing. He stood for the Green Party in Hutt South in 2002 but has since joined the Labour Party.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required.

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Workshops

Community-based Archives Masterclass

Date: 25 September 2014

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Pipitea Campus, Wellington

A special masterclass with international archive expert and researcher, Professor Anne Gilliland

Overview:

Community archives are emerging globally in physical, digital and hybrid forms. This is due, in part, to a mix of factors (political, professional and technological) that go beyond earlier forms of community heritage and documentary efforts. Characterised by their community-centricity, community archives often blur distinctions between archives and other kinds of information, memory and heritage institutions and their associated professions and practices, and engage a range of disciplinary, cultural and community expertise. Community voices may be recorded, stored, presented, disseminated, accessed and augmented, often independently of physical archives, by employing social media, mobile technologies and cloud computing. Use of such technology, coupled with a social justice orientation that occurs in many grassroots community archival efforts, also brings the community archives movement into a new dialogue with the field of community informatics.

This masterclass will encourage participants to reflect critically upon questions that might arise as part of their engagement with community archives initiatives.

Who should attend:

Archivists, records managers, museum and heritage sector professionals, librarians, community informatics specialists, community members, academics and anyone with a desire to explore the notion of community archiving and memory in depth. Limited to 18 participants; early bird discount available.

Bio:

Professor Ann GillilandAnne Gilliland is a professor of Information Studies and Moving Image Archive Studies and chair of the UCLA Department of Information Studies. She is also the director of the Center for Information as Evidence and of the MLIS Specialization in Archival Studies program.

Anne Gilliland’s research in archival informatics concentrates on points where issues relating to record-keeping, accountability, enterprise and societal memory intersect with technology within and across organizational, community and disciplinary domains. At a broader level, her work examines how this area can be instrumental in building and furthering archival research, theory, professional practice and education as well as the archival role as it is perceived and is instrumental in society.

Professor Ann Gilliland is being hosted by the School of Information Management.

Resolving Matters in the Employment Relations Authority

Date: 25 July – 5 August 2014

Time: 1.30 pm

Venue: Christchurch, Auckland and Wellington

The Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (CLEW) presents a series of workshops which follow their annual seminars 'The Employment Agreements: Bargaining Trends and Employment Law Update' in Christchurch, Auckland and Wellington.

These workshops will focus on how to run a matter in the Employment Relations Authority. ERA members will be involved in the seminar and the session will include a simulated hearing.

They will be of interest to HR and ER professionals, union officials and employment lawyers, especially those who have had little experience in the process of taking a matter to the ERA.

Lunch will be provided for those attending both the seminar in the morning and the workshop. The cost will be $200+gst. Group discounts for more than 6 people from one organisation are available by contacting the Centre.

See workshop registration links »

NZ Macroeconomic Dynamics Workshop 2014

Date: 28 April 2014

Time: 8.40 am

Venue: Railway Building, Level 3, RWW 315

This workshop, hosted by the School of Economics and Finance, honours leading macroeconomist Professor Stephen J Turnovsky, Castor Chair of Economics at the University of Washington.

There is no registration fee for the Macroeconomic Dynamics Workshop, but RSVP/Registration for catering purposes will be required by 5.00pm Wednesday 16 April to Ingrid.Watts@vuw.ac.nz.

Document File size File type
2014 Workshop Programme 520 KB PDF

Keynote Speaker: Professor James Morley, University of New South Wales: "Measuring Economic Slack: A Forecast Based Approach with Applications to Economies in Asia and the Pacific"

Bio:

Professor Morley received his PhD from the University of Washington in 1999. Prior to arriving in Australia, he was a faculty member at Washington University in St. Louis (1999-2010) and a research fellow at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis (2004-2010). He has also held visiting positions at the Bank of Canada and the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, and has worked regularly with the forecasting firm Macroeconomic Advisers.

Professor Morley's research focuses on time-series applications in macroeconomics, finance, and international finance. He has written on topics such as trend/cycle decomposition for macroeconomic data, the long-run consequences of recessions, stock market volatility and return predictability, and the adjustment of exchange rates to purchasing power parity. His articles have appeared in top journals, including the Journal of Econometrics, Journal of International Economics, Journal of Monetary Economics, and Review of Economics and Statistics.

 

Nudge, Budge or Nuzzle: A workshop on Nudging, Behavioural Economics & Public Policy

Date: 20 February 2014

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3)

Speakers: Professor Graham Room, University of Bath & Professor Martin Lodge, London School of Economics

Background:

This workshop will consider the value of 'nudge' as a guide to policy-making.

In recent years 'nudge' has come into fashion, under the inspiration of behavioural economics and, in particular, Thaler and Sustein's widely cited 'Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness' (2008).

There will be plenty time in the workshop for other participants to contribute their perspectives and their practical experience of policy making.

Hosted by the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies. All welcome, no RSVP required; email any enquiries to igps@vuw.ac.nz.

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