School of Marketing and International Business

About the SMIB Kōrero - Research & Discussion Series

The School hosts a number of research workshops throughout the year. We refer to it as the SMIB Kōrero - Research & Discussion Series. You can read about our recent workshops under Past Events, or browse the archive below.

Getting Your Paper Published: A Gamble or a Skill?

The School of Marketing and International Business invites you to an academic writing seminar:

Date: Friday 25th November 2011
Time: 2.20pm - 3.20pm
Venue: Rutherford House, RH 1113, Level 11, Rutherford House
Presenter: Dr. Eelko Huizingh
This seminar will be followed by Hongzhi's Korero seminar after a 10 minute afternoon tea.

Dr Huizingh is a prolific writer with over 300 publications, including academic papers in top journals, professional articles, columns and books. His seminar will be on tips for publishing.

Top academic journals have an acceptance rate of 10 percent, or less. What could make your paper to be ‘that special one’? Is it a gamble or a skill? We think it is much more a skill than a gamble that makes the difference. A better paper is not always a better study. Often, a better paper is a paper that has been written better. It is the product of a more skilled author. Since skills can be trained, we discuss how to increase the success rate of academic papers.

In this seminar we focus on the essentials of academic writing. An important element of a successful paper is the introduction. Here, the contribution of the paper is defined. What is the problem? Why is it relevant? What do we already know about it? What will this paper add to our understanding? We will also discuss the process of writing: how can you make your work easier to read? Finally, we address the review: how do you survive this (partly) subjective process? Why is academic writing relevant? . . .

More information about Dr. Eelko Huizingh academic career can be found at: http://www.rug.nl/staff/k.r.e.huizingh .

For More Information:
Contact: Dr Hongzhi Gao
Phone: 04 463 6914
Email:address

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Relational Risks for Boundary Spanners in Chinese-Foreign Business Interactions - A Guanxi and Confucian Interpretation

Date: Friday 25th November 2011
Time: 3.30pm - 4.30pm
Venue: Rutherford House, RH 1113, Level 11, Rutherford House
Presenter: Dr Hongzhi Gao
Dr Gao will share with you a recent journey of writing and revision a paper for consideration in the International Marketing Review (IMR). The revision is still not completed yet and he would love to hear your views/ comments/critiques/suggestions on the paper.

Guanxi as a cultural construct (‘personal connections’ in Chinese) has been seen as a valuable resource and also a management dilemma for foreign businesses operating in China.  A systemic review of the literature finds that the international marketing and guanxi literature has paid little attention to indigenous concerns of organisational boundary spanners when they attempt to work between guanxi insiders (Chinese employees/clients/suppliers/agents/distributors) and outsiders (foreign parties) in a shared middle-culture zone. This paper takes a relational risk perspective and investigates the guanxi perceived constraints for boundary spanners. We applied an inductive-deductive theory building approach to draw conceptual understandings. Fifty-six in-depth interviews were conducted with Chinese and Western informants in China and New Zealand.  This study revealed nine guanxi-bounded cultural constraints at the empirical level. By applying the relational risk concept, the guanxi network view, and also the Confucian ideology, the paper develops a conceptual model of guanxi perceived risks in boundary spanning; all related to breaking of Confucian norms and a threat to boundary spanners’ status or position in closely-knitted guanxi networks. An improved understanding of relational risk in a guanxi network structure is therefore offered.

This study offers some practical implications for Western firms trading with or investing in China: A negotiated guanxi strategy may largely counteract the risks for guanxi boundary spanners by embracing fewer requirements for transparency or keeping guanxi information confidential, assuring insiders’ positions, protecting their face, granting them power, placing more personal trust in them, and reciprocating their use of personal networks. A dual identity, an open-minded guanxi boundary spanner, may play a vital role in intercultural relationships.

For More Information:
Contact: Dr Hongzhi Gao
Phone: 04 463 6914
Email:address

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Like it or Not: Differences in Advertising Likeability and Dislikeability Within Asia

Date:  Thursday, 15th September 2011
Time: 2.30pm - 3.30pm
Venue: Rutherford House, RH 1113, Level 11, Rutherford House
Presenter: Dr Aaron Gazley
This study is part of a stream of Asian focussed research, with an emphasis on Asian consumer's attitudes towards television advertisements (ads). The results provide insight into the antecedents and consequences of liked and disliked ads and the cultural differences that influence these relationships. A matched sample of young consumers from the four Asian cities was asked to nominate ads that they both liked and disliked. They also provided reasons as to why they were liked and disliked and the effect this had on their purchase intentions. Findings show that ad likeability increases if people feel that advertising provides something to talk about. Conversely, people who find advertising annoying have higher ratings of ad dislikeability. Results also show that, a close relationship exists between liking (disliking) television ads and buying more (less) of the advertised products. However for all these relationships, differences were found to exist between Asian cities, with the only commonality being that disliked ads reduce intent to purchase. The results suggest that adherence to a standardised regional advertising strategy based on assumptions that close geography and culture within the Asian region is appropriate, could lead to precious little success for firms.

For More Information:
Contact: Dr Aaron Gazley
Phone: 04 463 5725
Email: address

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The Effect of Interfirm Relational ties on Information Sharing and Knowledge Acquisition: Does Guanxi Institution Matter?

Date: 11th August 2011
Time: 3.00pm - 4.00 pm
Venue: Rutherford House, RH 1113, Level 11, Rutherford House
Presenter: Dr Forrest Yang.

This study examines the effects of Guanxi institution on the relationships among interfirm relational ties, information sharing, and knowledge acquisition in the setting of Chinese business environments. With data collected from 338 manufacturing companies, the authors find that, with strong Guanxi institution, interfirm relational ties are linearly related to information sharing; whereas with withering Guanxi institution, the marginal effects of an interfirm relational tie declines as its strength increases. On the contrast, in an environment with strong Guanxi institution, information sharing has an inverted U-shaped effect on knowledge acquisition; whereas in an environment with weak Guanxi institution, the relationship becomes linear. Guanxi institution also partially moderates the direct, positive effect of interfirm relational ties on knowledge acquisition. The findings can help managers strategically adjust interfirm relational ties in terms of different institutional environments so as to maximize knowledge acquisition.

Forrest Yang is an associate professor at SMIB. His current research interest is on institutional theory in business markets. He has publish in such journals as Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Operations Management, among others.

For More Information:
Contact: Dr Forrest Yang
Phone: 04 463 6915
Email: address

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The influence of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on the globalisation of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)

Date:  Thursday, 14th July 2011
Time: 3.00 - 4.00pm
Venue: Rutherford House, RH 1113, Level 11, Rutherford House
Presenter: Dr Thomas Borghoff

Accelerated globalisation since the 1990s and the development of Internet-based information and communication technologies (ICTs) drive each other. Nonetheless, there has been limited research on the influence of ICT on the globalisation process of firms. The seminar serves to provide an overview of existing literature in this field and to develop a basic framework for the study of the influence of ICT on the globalisation process of firms. Specifically, the seminar reflects on the influence of ICT on the four subprocesses of globalisation:

  1. global foundation of firms (“Born Globals”/”International New Ventures”)
  2. internationalisation
  3. global network development, and
  4. global evolutionary dynamics.

An empirical study serves to provide evidence for this influence based on a mixed method approach. The study is based on twenty histographic case studies of SMEs founded after 1980 from four countries in both large emerging markets (China and India) and in small developed markets (New Zealand and Singapore). The study therefore allows for a comparison of firms on different levels. NVivo 8 helped in the analysis of qualitative data, exemplified and enriched through “quantising” the results by using descriptive statistics. The results show that most SMEs in the sample by now have contrary to previous findings already a “deep” integration of ICT in their global activities and that the discussion of “born global” versus “incremental internationalisation” is not as clear as it seems. In addition, the study provides evidence that despite the general focus in literature on “levelling the playing field” in the internationalisation (i.e., building up new activities abroad) between SMEs and large multinationals, the most important influence of ICT perceived by the sample firms is rather on global network development and on the management of global evolutionary dynamics.

For More Information:
Contact: Dr Thomas Borghoff
Phone: 04 463 9992
Email: address

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Findings from the FRST project: Service Success in Asia-Building a Sustainable Competitive Advantage for New Zealand Service Firms in Asia: Spotlight on China and India

Date: Friday 11th February 2011.
Time: 1.45 pm - 2-45 p.m.
Venue: Rutherford House, RH 1113, Level 11, Rutherford House.
Presenter: Dr Val Lindsay.

This 2-year FRST-funded research project was completed in September 2010. The project utilised a dyadic approach, involving interview data from seventy managers of New Zealand firms engaged in business in China and/or India. Interview data were also collected from approx. twenty five customers of these firms, as well as fifteen to twenty other respondents associated with them (e.g. government agencies, advisors etc) in each of China and India. The presentation will provide an overview of the major findings as they will be presented to the New Zealand business and government communities at the end of March. Themes for potential journal publication will also be explored.


For More Information:
Contact: Dr Val Lindsay
Phone: 04 463 6915
Email: address

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Using process research to better understand decisions of cultural sponsorship

Date: Friday 14th January 2011.
Time: 1.45 pm - 2-45 p m.
Venue: Rutherford House, RH 1113, Level 11, Rutherford House.
Presenter: Kate Daellenbach.

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce some of my research, and in particular to discuss process research; and how it was applied in this study.

The subject of the research is the decision process by companies considering cultural sponsorship. Sponsorship is a significant part of revenues for many cultural organisations around the world, yet little is known of the process potential sponsors work through in making these decisions. This research seeks to better understand how these decisions are made, and does so using tools and techniques of process research, which addresses dynamic questions about temporally evolving phenomena (Langley, 2009, p. 409).

Guided by process research advice, a multiple-case method was employed whereby data was gathered from informants within cultural organizations and paired sponsoring companies for 10 sponsorship decisions in New Zealand.; Within and between case analyses were conducted and examined interactively. The results of this study indicate that cultural sponsorship decision-making processes may be divided into stages. Considering these stages, three process paths are identified, along with influences which determine and characterise these paths. These processes and influences combine together to paint a more detailed picture of these decisions, to offer contributions to the literature and to suggest areas for future study.

For More Information:
Contact: Kate Daellenbach
Phone: 04 463 5086
Email:address