Benjamin Snyder

Lecturer School of Social and Cultural Studies

Courses

Teaching in 2017

Dr Benjamin Snyder profile picture

Qualifications

BA (Haverford College), MA, PhD (University of Virginia)

Research specialties

Work, occupations, and organizations; cultural sociology; sociology of time and space; sociology of morality; sociology of emotion; social psychology; social theory; ethnography

Current research

My research is broadly concerned with meaning and moral order in advanced capitalist societies. I am interested in how individuals conceptualize what it means to lead a good life, to make good decisions, and to live meaningfully under conditions of rapid change, uncertainty, and risk. Some current research themes include:

  • flexible capitalism, precarious work, and moral order
  • temporalities of social change
  • quantification, commensuration, and extreme abstraction in the workplace.

Selected publications

Books

Snyder, Benjamin H. (2016). The Disrupted Workplace: Time and the Moral Order of Flexible Capitalism. New York, Oxford University Press.

Journal articles

Snyder, B. H. (2017). The Tyranny of Clock Time? Debating Fatigue in the US Truck Driving Industry. Time and Society

Snyder, B. H. (2016). The Disruptables. The Hedgehog Review. 18(1): 46-57

Snyder, Benjamin H. (2013). From Vigilance to Busyness: A Neo-Weberian Approach to Clock Time, Sociological Theory 31(3):243-266.

Snyder, Benjamin H. (2012). Dignity and the Professionalized Body: Truck Driving in the Age of Instant Gratification. The Hedgehog Review 14(3):8-20.

Snyder, Benjamin H. (2010). Emotional Control: A Bibliographic Review. The Hedgehog Review 12(1):45-51.

Oishi, S, Kesebir, S., & Snyder, B.H. (2009). Sociology: A Lost Connection in Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Review 13(4):334-353.

Essays, book reviews, and other publications

Snyder, B. H. (2015). Time Bound on the Open Road. Contexts. 14(3): 62-64

Snyder, Benjamin H. (2009). Book Review: Religion and Cultural Memory: Ten Studies. Jan Assmann. Memory Studies 2(1):127-129.