Joseph Bulbulia

Professor School of Art History, Classics and Religious Studies

Courses

Teaching in 2017

Research interests

Cognitive Science of Religion, Longitudinal Study of Religion, Quantitative Methods.

Dr Joseph Bulbulia profile picture

Qualifications

PhD (Princeton University)

Research specialties

My research expertise is in the evolution of religion, broadly conceived.

  • I am a core member of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (NZAVS) created by Chris G. Sibley (Auckland) in 2009, which is repeatedly investigating values in a large longitudinal sample of 18,000 New Zealanders each year.
  • I also research in the areas of cultural phylogenetics, with Russell Gray (Max Planck), Quentin Atkinson (Auckland), Simon Greenhill (ANU), and Joseph Watts (Auckland). We test evolutionary hypotheses about religion using a rich database of Austronesian cultures that we constructed for this purpose.  For information, please visit: www.pulotu.com
  • I use a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods and models -- though mainly quantitative, and mainly drawn from the biological and social sciences.
  • More about my research can be found on my personal website: www.josephbulbulia.com

Current research projects

  • I hold a Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Grant and a Templeton World Charity Foundation Grant investigating religious change and stability in a large sample of New Zealanders over time.
  • I serve on the boards of several journals, and am co-editor of the journal Religion, Brain, and Behavior.
  • I am currently President of the International Association for the Cognitive Science of Religion.
  • I  welcome supervising students in the longitudinal study of religion/spirituality in New Zealand and in the evolutionary study of religion/spirituality across the Pacific.  I also supervise (and publish) in experimental and quasi-experimental ritual studies, investigating how real world group activities affect social bonding and well-being.

Publications

For links to PDFs of publications go to: www.josephbulbulia.com

Select science publications

1. Cristofori, J. Bulbulia, J. H.  Shaver, M.  Wilson, F.  Krueger, and J. Grafman. Neural correlates of mystical experience. Neuropsychologia, 80:212–220, 2016.

2. Shaver, J. H.,  Troughton, G.,  Sibley,  C.  G.,  and  Bulbulia, J. A. (2016).   Religion  and  the unmaking of prejudice toward Muslims: Evidence from a large  national sample. PLoS  ONE, 11(3):1–2

Watts, J., Sheehan, O., Atkinson, Q. D., Bulbulia, J., and Gray, R. (2016). Ritual human sacrifice promoted and sustained the evolution of stratified societies. Nature, 532:228–231.

3. Watts, J., Greenhill, S. J., Atkinson, Q. D., Currie, T. E., Bulbulia, J., and Gray, R. D. (2015). Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods pre-cede the evolution of political complexity in Austronesia. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 282(1804).

4. Bulbulia, J. A., Troughton, G., Greaves, L., Milfont, T.  L., Botera, C.,  Gray, R.,  and  Sibley, C. (2015). To burn or to save?  the  opposing functions of reading scripture on environmental intentions.

5. Watts, J.,  Sheehan,  O., Greenhill,  S. J.,  Gomes-Ng,  S., Atkinson, Q. D., Bulbulia,  J.,  and  Gray, R. D. (2015).  Pulotu: Database of Austronesian supernatural beliefs and practices. PLoS ONE, 10(9):e0136783

6. S Sibley, C. G. and Bulbulia, J. (2015). Charity explains differences in life satis-faction between religious and secular New Zealanders. Religion, Brain & Be-havior, 5(2):91–100.

7. Sibley, C. G. and Bulbulia,  J. A. (2014).  How do religious identities and basic value orientations affect each other  over time? International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 24(1):64–76. DOI:  10.1080/10508619.2013.771600

8. Botero, C. A., Gardner, B., Kirby, K. R., Bulbulia, J., Gavin, M. C., and Gray, R. D. (2014). The ecology of religious beliefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(47):16784–16789.

9. Bulbulia, J. A., Xygalatas, D., Schjoedt, U., Fondevila, S., Sibley, C. G., and Kon-valinka, I. (2013). Images from a jointly-arousing collective ritual reveal affec-tive polarization. Frontiers in Psychology, 4(960).

10. Xygalatas, D., Mitkidis, P., Fischer, R., Reddish, P., Skewes, J., Geertz, A. W., Roepstorff, A., and Bulbulia, J. (2013). Extreme rituals promote prosociality. Psychological Science, 24(8):1602–1605.

11. Bulbulia, J., Osborne, D., and Sibley, C. G. (2013). Moral foundations predict re-ligious orientations in New Zealand. PLoS ONE, 8(12):e80224.

12. Reddish, P., Fischer, R., and Bulbulia, J. (2013). Let’s dance together: Syn-chrony, shared intention- ality and cooperation. PLoS ONE, 8(8):e71182.

13. Sibley, C. G. and Bulbulia, J. (2012). Faith after an earthquake: A longitudinal study of religion and perceived health before and after the 2011 Christchurch New Zealand earthquake. PloS one, 10(12):e49648.DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0049648

14. Konvalinka, I., Xygalatas, D., Bulbulia, J., Schjoedt, U., Jegindoe, E. M., Wallot, S., Van Orden, G., and Roepstorff, A. (2011). Synchronized arousal between performers and related spectators in a fire-walking ritual. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(20):8514–8519.

15. Bulbulia, J. and Mahoney, A. (2008). Religious solidarity: The hand grenade ex-periment. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 8(3):295–320.DOI: 10.1163/156853708X358191

Select theory publications

1. Bulbulia, J. (2013). Bayes and the evolution of religious belief. In Moreland, J. P., Sweis, K. A., and V., M. C., editors, Debating Christian Theism, chapter 17, pages 223–241. Oxford University Press.

2. Bulbulia, J. (2012). Ennuitheism. In MacNamara, P. and Wildman, W. J., editors, Science and the World’s Religions: Vol 3. Religions and Controversies, chapter 7, pages 165–194. Praeger, Santa Barbara, CA.

3. Bulbulia, J. (2012). Spreading order: religion, cooperative niche construction, and risky coordination problems. Biology & philosophy, 27(1):1–27. DOI: 10.1007/s10539-011-9295-x

4. Bulbulia, J. (2009). Charismatic signalling. Journal for the Study of Religion, Na-ture, Culture, 3(4):518–551. DOI: 10.1558/jsrnc.v3i4.518

5. Bulbulia, J. (2009).Religiosity as mental time travel: cognitive adaptations for religious behavior. In Schloss, J. and Murray, M., editors, The Believing Pri-mate: Scientific, Philosophical and Theological Perspectives on the Evolution of Religion, chapter 2, pages 44–75. Oxford University Press, New York.

6. Bulbulia, J. (2008). Meme infection or religious niche construction? an adapta-tionist alternative to the cultural maladaptationist hypothesis. Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, 20(1):67–107.

7. Bulbulia, J. (2008). Free love: Religious solidarity on the cheap. In Bulbulia, J., Sosis, R., Genet, R., Harris, E., Wyman, K., and Genet, C., editors, The Evolution of Religion: Studies, Theories, and Critiques, chapter 18, pages 153–160. Col-lins Foundation Press, Santa Margarita, CA.

8. Bulbulia, J. (2006). Nature’s medicine: religiosity as an adaptation for health and cooperation. In MacNamara, P., editor, Where Man and God Meet: the new sciences of religion and brain, chapter 5, pages 87–121. Greenwood Pub-lishers, Westwood CT.

9. Bulbulia, J. (2005). Are there any religions? Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, 17(2):71–100. DOI: 10.1163/1570068054305619

10. Bulbulia, J. (2004). Religious costs as adaptations that signal altruistic inten-tion. Evolution and Cognition, 10(1):19–38.

Select critical review publications

1. Bulbulia, J. (2014). The arts transform the cognitive science of religion. Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion, 1(2):141–160.

2. Bulbulia, J., Wilson, M. S., and Sibley, C. G. (2014). Thin and thinner: Hypothe-sis-driven research and the study of humans. Numen, 61(2-3):166–181.

3. Bulbulia, J., Geertz, A., Atkinson, Q., Cohen, E., Evans, N., Francois, P., Gintis, H., Gray, R., Henrich, J., Jordon, F., Norenzayan, A., Richerson, P. J., Slingerland, E., Turchin, P., Whitehouse, H., Widlok, T., and Wilson, D. (2013). The cultural evolution of religion. In Richerson, P. J. and Christiansen, M., editors, Cultural Evolution, chapter 20, pages 381–404. MIT press, Cambridge, MA.

4. Bulbulia, J. and Schjoedt, U. (2012). Toward an evolutionary social neurosci-ence of religion. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 1(3):220–222.

5. Bulbulia, J. and Slingerland, E. (2012). Religious studies as a life science. Nu-men, 59(5-6):564–613.

6. Bulbulia, J. and Reddish, P. (2012). Explaining effervescence. In Dawes, G. W., and Maclaurin, J., editors, A New Science of Religions, chapter 3, pages 43–64. Routledge, New York.

7. Bulbulia, J. and  Schjoedt, U. (2012).  The  neural  basis  of religious  belief. In Krueger, F. and Grafman, J.,  editors,

8. Bulbulia, J. and Sosis, R. (2011). Signalling theory and the evolution of religious cooperation. Religion, 41(3):363–388. DOI:10.1080/0048721X.2011.604508

9. Slingerland, E. and Bulbulia, J. (2011). Introductory essay: Evolutionary science and the study of religion. Religion, 41(3):307–328. DOI: 10.1080/0048721X.2011.604513

10. Bulbulia, J. (2007). The evolution of religion. In Dunbar, R. and Barrett, L., edi-tors, Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology, chapter 43, pages 621–636. Oxford University Press, New York.

11.Bulbulia, J. (2004).    The  cognitive and  evolutionary  psychology of religion.    Biology  and Philosophy, 18(5):655–686.

12. Bulbulia, J. (2004). The cognitive and evolutionary psychology of religion. Biol-ogy and Philosophy, 18(5):655–686.

2017

1. Bulbulia, J., Fraser, G., Watts, J., & Shaver, J. H. (2017). Can honest signaling theory clarify religion’s role in the evolution of social inequality? Religion, Brain & Behavior. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/2153599X.2016.1249914

2. Bulbulia,   J. (2017). Tradition’s hidden economy. Nature  Human Behaviour,  1, 0070. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-017-0070 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-017-0070

3.Shaver, J. &  Joseph Bulbulia.  (in  press). Charismatic  Signaling:  How religion  stabilizes cooperation and entrenches inequality.  In Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary  Perspectives on Religion, J. Liddle and T. Shackelford, Eds., Oxford:  Oxford University Press.

4. Sosis, R., Bulbulia, J., Wildman, W. J., and Schjoedt, U. (2017). Religion, brain & behavior’s seventh year. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 7(1):1–2.doi:10.1080/2153599X.2017.1267953  

2016

1. Bulbulia   J.A.,   Spezio M,  Sosis R.,  Wildman   W.  J.  (2016)    Standards  for  Publishing in  Religion,   Brain   &  Behavior     Religion,   Brain   &  Behavior     6  (4):    275–277. Doi:
10.1080/2153599X.2016.1227123  

2. L. M. Greaves, F. K. Barlow, C. H. Lee, C. M. Matika,  W. Wang, C.-J. Lindsay, C. J. Case, N. K. Sengupta, Y. Huang, L. J. Cowie, et al. The diversity and prevalence of sexual orientation self-labels in a New Zealand national sample. Archives of Sexual Behavior, pages 1–12, 2016.

3. Shaver, J. H. and Bulbulia,  J. A. (2016). Signaling theory and religion.  In Mental Religion, Chapter 7, pages 101–117. Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks.

4. Shaver, J. H., Troughton,  G., Sibley, C. G., and Bulbulia,  J. A. (2016).  Religion and the unmaking of prejudice toward muslims: Evidence from a large national sample. PLoS ONE,
11(3):1–25.

5. Sibley   C.   G.,   Robertson,   A.   Osborne,D.,Huang,    Y.,Milojev,P.,Greaves,L.Houkamau, C. A.,Bulbulia, J.A.,  and Barkow,  F.K.  (2016)  Bias and tracking  accuracy in voting  pro- jections using the New Zealand Attitudes  and Values Study. Political Science, pages 1–16 

6.  Sosis,R. , M. L. Spezio, J. Bulbulia, and W. J. Wildman. Editorial:  The peer reviewer dilemma:
how to appreciate the underappreciated. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 6(1):1–3, 2016. 

7.  Spezio, M. L., Wildman,  W. J., Sosis, R., and Bulbulia,  J. (2016). Editorial:  Religion and
emotion. Religion, Brain  & Behavior, 5(3):185–187.

8.  Watts, J., Bulbulia,  J., Gray, R., and Atkinson,  Q. (2016). Clarity and causality needed in claims about big gods. Behavior and Brain  Sciences, 39:41–42

9. Watts,  J., Sheehan, O., Atkinson,  Q. D., Bulbulia,  J., and Gray, R. (2016).  Ritual  human sacrifice promoted and sustained the evolution of stratified societies. Nature, 532:228–231.

2015

1. Bulbulia, J. A., Shaver, J., Greaves, L., Sosis, R., and Sibley, C. G. (2015). Religion and parental cooperation: an empirical test of Slone’s sexual signaling model. In Slone, D. and Van Slyke, J., editors, The Attraction of Religion: A Sexual Se-lectionist Account, chapter 2, pages 29–62. Bloomsbury Press.

2. Greaves, L., Cowie, L., Fraser, G., Muriwai, E., Zdrenka, M., Huang, Y., Milojev, P., Osborne, D., Bulbulia, J., Wilson, M., Liu, J., Clouston, A., and Sibley, C. (2015). Regional differences and similarities in the personality of New Zea-landers. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 44(1):4–16.

3. Greaves, L., Milojev, P., Huang, Y., Stronge, S., Osborne, D., Bulbulia, J., Grim-shaw, M., and Sibley, C. (2015). Regional differences in the psychological re-covery of Christchurch residents following the 2010/2011 earthquakes: A longi-tudinal study. PLoS ONE, 10(5):e0124278.

4. Hoverd, W. J., Bulbulia, J., Partow, N., and Sibley, C. G. (2015). Forecasting reli-gious change: a Bayesian model predicting proportional Christian change in New Zealand. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 5(1):15–23.

5. Satherley, N., Milojev, P., Greaves, L. M., Huang, Y., Osborne, D., Bulbulia, J., and Sibley, C. G. (2015). Demographic and psychological predictors of panel at-trition: Evidence from the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study. PLoS ONE, 10(3):e0121950.

6. Sibley, C. G. and Bulbulia, J. (2015). Charity explains differences in life satisfac-tion between religious and secular New Zealanders. Religion, Brain & Behav-ior, 5(2):91–100.

7. Watts, J., Greenhill, S. J., Atkinson, Q. D., Currie, T. E., Bulbulia, J., and Gray, R. D. (2015). Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods pre-cede the evolution of political complexity in Austronesia. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 282(1804).

2014

8. Botero, C. A., Gardner, B., Kirby, K. R., Bulbulia, J., Gavin, M. C., and Gray, R. D. (2014). The ecology of religious beliefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(47):16784– 16789.

9. Bulbulia, J., Wilson, M. S., and Sibley, C. G. (2014). Thin and thinner: Hypothe-sis-driven research and the study of humans. Numen, 61(2-3):166–181.

10. Bulbulia, J. (2014). The arts transform the cognitive science of religion. Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion, 1(2):141–160.

11. Bulbulia, J. A. (2014). Review: Changing minds: Religion and cognition through the ages. Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion, 2(1):75–78.

12. Fischer, R., Xygalatas, D., Mitkidis, P., Reddish, P., Tok, P., Konvalinka, I., and Bulbulia, J. (2014). The fire-walker’s high: Affect and physiological responses in an extreme collective ritual. PLoS ONE, 9(2):e88355.

13. Milojev, P., Osborne, D., Greaves, L., Bulbulia, J., Wilson, M., Davies, C., Liu, J., and Sibley, C. (2014). Right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orien-tation predict different moral signatures. Social Justice Research, 27(2):149–174.

14. Reddish, P., Bulbulia, J., and Fischer, R. (2014). Does synchrony promote gen-eralized prosociality? Religion, Brain & Behavior, 4(1):3–19.

15. Sibley, C. G. and Bulbulia, J. A. (2014). How do religious identities and basic value orientations affect each other over time? International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 24(1):64–76. DOI: 10.1080/10508619.2013.77160.

16. Troughton, G., Bulbulia, J., and Sibley, C. (2014). Strength of religion and the future of the churches. Stimulus, pages 27–34.

17. Wilson, M. S., Bulbulia, J., and Sibley, C. G. (2014). Differences and similarities in religious and paranormal beliefs: a typology of distinct faith signatures. Re-ligion, Brain & Behavior, 4(2):104–126.

2013

18. Bulbulia, J., Osborne, D., and Sibley, C. G. (2013). Moral foundations predict re-ligious orientations in New Zealand. PLoS ONE, 8(12):e80224. OPENACCESS

19. Bulbulia, J. A., Xygalatas, D., Schjoedt, U., Fondevila, S., Sibley, C. G., and Kon-valinka, I. (2013). Images from a jointly-arousing collective ritual reveal affec-tive polarization. Frontiers in Psychology, 4(960). OPENACCESS

20. Bulbulia, J., Geertz, A., Atkinson, Q., Cohen, E., Evans, N., Francois, P., Gintis, H., Gray, R., Henrich, J., Jordon, F., Norenzayan, A., Richerson, P. J., Slingerland, E., Turchin, P., Whitehouse, H., Widlok, T., and Wilson, D. (2013). The cultural evolution of religion. In Richerson, P. J. and Christiansen, M., editors, Cultural Evolution, chapter 20, pages 381–404. MIT press, Cambridge, MA.

21. Bulbulia, J. (2013). Toward an evolutionary cognitive science of mental cul-tures: lessons from Freud. In Xygalatas, D. and McCorkle, W., editors, Mental Culture: Towards a Cognitive Science of Religion, chapter 2, pages 110–127. Equinox, London.

22. Bulbulia, J., Atkinson, Q., Gray, and Greenhill, S. (2013). Why do religious cul-tures evolve slowly?, chapter 12, pages 197–212. Acumen Publishing, Durham, UK.

23. Bulbulia, J. (2013). Why costly-signalling models of religion require cognitive psychology. In Geertz, A., editor, Origins of Religion, Cognition, and Culture, pages 71–81. Equinox, London.

24. Bulbulia, J. A., Atkinson, Q., Greenhill, S., and Gray, R. (2013). First shots fired for the phylogenetic revolution in religious studies. Cliodynamics: The Journal of Theoretical and Mathematical History, 4(1):128–133.

25. Bulbulia, J. (2013). Bayes and the evolution of religious belief. In Moreland, J. P., Sweis, K. A., and V., M. C., editors, Debating Christian Theism, chapter 17, pages 223–241. Oxford University Press.

26. Bulbulia, J. and Schjoedt, U. (2013). The neural basis of religious belief. In Krueger, F. and Grafman, J., editors, The Neural Basis of Human Belief Systems, chapter 9, pages 169–190. Psychology Press.

27. Fischer, R., Callander, R., Reddish, P., and Bulbulia, J. (2013). How do rituals af-fect cooperation? Human Nature, 24(2):115–125.

28. Hoverd, W. J., Bulbulia, J., and Sibley, C. G. (2013). Does poverty predict reli-gion? Religion, Brain & Behavior, 3(3):185–200.

29. Reddish, P., Fischer, R., and Bulbulia, J. (2013). Let’s dance together: Syn-chrony, shared intention- ality and cooperation. PLoS ONE, 8(8):e71182. .

30. Sibley, C. G. and Bulbulia, J. (2013). The proportion of religious residents pre-dicts the values of nonreligious neighbors: evidence from a national sample. Religion, Brain and Behavior, 3(3):219–232. DOI:10.1080/2153599X.2012.739740

31. Schjoedt, U., Sørensen, J., Nielbo, K. L., Xygalatas, D., Mitkidis, P., and Bulbulia, J. (2013). Cognitive resource depletion in religious interactions. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 3(1):39–55.

32. Xygalatas, D., Schjoedt, U., Bulbulia, J., Konvalinka, I., Jegindø, E.-M., Reddish, P., Geertz, A. W., and Roepstoff, A. (2013). Autobiographical memory in a fire-walking ritual. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 13(1-2):1–16. DOI:10.1163/15685373-12342081

33. Xygalatas, D., Mitkidis, P., Fischer, R., Reddish, P., Skewes, J., Geertz, A. W., Roepstorff, A., and Bulbulia, J. (2013). Extreme rituals promote prosociality. Psychological Science, 24(8):1602–1605.

2012

34. Bulbulia, J. (2012). Spreading order: religion, cooperative niche construction, and risky coordination problems. Biology & philosophy, 27(1):1–27. DOI: 10.1007/s10539-011-9295-x

35. Bulbulia, J. (2012). Ennuitheism. In MacNamara, P. and Wildman, W. J., editors, Science and the World’s Religions: Vol 3. Religions and Controversies, chapter 7, pages 165–194. Praeger, Santa Barbara, CA.

36. Bulbulia, J., Frean, M., and Reddish, P. (2012). Ecological signalling. In Dawes, G. W. and Maclaurin, J., editors, A New Science of Religions, chapter 6, pages 100–110. Routledge.

37. Bulbulia, J. and Reddish, P. (2012). Explaining effervescence. In Dawes, G. W., M. J., editor, A New Science of Religions, chapter 3, pages 43–64. Routledge, New York.

38. Bulbulia, J. and Schjoedt, U. (2012). The neural basis of religious belief. In Krueger, F. and Grafman, J., editors, The Neural Basis of Human Belief Systems, chapter 9, pages 169–190. Psychology Press.

39. Bulbulia, J. and Schjoedt, U. (2012). Toward an evolutionary social neurosci-ence of religion. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 1(3):220–222.

40. Bulbulia, J. and Slingerland, E. (2012). Religious studies as a life science. Nu-men, 59(5-6):564–613.

41. Sibley, C. and Bulbulia, J. (2012). Healing those who need healing: How reli-gious practice interacts with personality to affect social belonging. Journal for The Cognitive Science of Religion, 1(1):29–45.

42. Schjoedt, U. and Bulbulia, J. (2012). The need to believe in conflicting proposi-tions. Religion, Brain, and Behaviour, 1(3):236–239.

43. Sibley, C. G. and Bulbulia, J. (2012). Faith after an earthquake: A longitudinal study of religion and perceived health before and after the 2011 Christchurch New Zealand earthquake. PloS one, 7(12):e49648.DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0049648

2011

44. Bulbulia, J. and Frean, M. (2011). Affording cooperative populations. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 1(1):66–70.

45. Bulbulia, J. and Sosis, R. (2011). Signalling theory and the evolution of religious cooperation. Religion, 41(3):363–388. DOI:10.1080/0048721X.2011.604508

46. Bulbulia, J. (2011). The hypnotic stag hunt. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 11(3-4):353–365. DOI:10.1163/156853711X591297

47. Bulbulia, J. A. and Frean, M. (2011). Neutral evolution as a route to large-scale cooperation in the stag hunt game. In International Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS) 2011, hosted by NECSI (New England Complex Systems Institute July 1-6, 2011 (proceedings).

48. Konvalinka, I., Xygalatas, D., Bulbulia, J., Schjoedt, U., Jegindoe, E. M., Wallot, S., Van Orden, G., and Roepstorff, A. (2011). Synchronized arousal between performers and related spectators in a fire-walking ritual. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(20):8514–8519.

49. Slingerland, E. and Bulbulia, J. (2011). Introductory essay: Evolutionary science and the study of religion. Religion, 41(3):307–328. DOI: 10.1080/0048721X.2011.604513

50. Sosis, R. and Bulbulia, J. (2011). The behavioral ecology of religion: the benefits and costs of one evolutionary approach. Religion, 41(3):341–362.DOI: 10.1080/0048721X.2011.604514

51. Xygalatas, D., Konvalinka, I., Roepstoff, A., and Bulbulia, J. (2011). Quantifying collective effervescence heart-rate dynamics at a fire-walking ritual. Communi-cative and Integrative Biology, 4(6):735–738.DOI: 10.4161/cib.4.6.17609.

2010

52. Bulbulia, J. and Frean, M. (2010). The evolution of charismatic cultures. Meth-od and Theory in the Study of Religion, 22:254–271. DOI: 10.1163/157006810X531049

53. Bulbulia, J. and Schjoedt, U. (2010). Charismatic culture and prediction under risk: perspectives from social neuroscience. In Pyysiainen, I., editor, Religion, Economy, and Cooperation, chapter 2, pages 35–59. deGruyter, New York.

2009

54. Bulbulia, J. (2009). Charismatic signalling. Journal for the Study of Religion, Na-ture, Culture, 3(4):518–551. DOI: 10.1558/jsrnc.v3i4.518

55. Bulbulia, J. and Krueger, F. (2009). Social cognitive neuroscience and religion. Current Anthropology, 50(6):772–773.DOI: 10.1086/605767

56. Bulbulia, J. and Sosis, R. (2009). Belief as ideology. Behavior and the Brain Sci-ences, 32(6):515–516. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X09991403

57. Bulbulia, J. (2009). Religion as evolutionary cascade. In Stuasberg, M., editor, Contemporary Theories of Religion: A Critical Companion, chapter 10, pages 56–172. Routledge, New York.

58. Bulbulia, J. and Frean, M. (2009). Religion as superorganism. In Stausberg, M., editor, Contemporary Theories of Religion: A Critical Compagnion, chapter 11, pages 173–194. Routledge, New York.

59. Bulbulia, J. (2009).Religiosity as mental time travel: cognitive adaptations for religious behavior. In Schloss, J. and Murray, M., editors, The Believing Pri-mate: Scientific, Philosophical and Theological Perspectives on the Evolution of Religion, chapter 2, pages 44–75. Oxford University Press, New York.

2008

60. Bulbulia, J. (2008). Meme infection or religious niche construction? an adapta-tionist alternative to the cultural maladaptationist hypothesis. Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, 20(1):67–107.

61. Bulbulia, J. (2008). Ritual studies and ritual theories: A guide for the per-plexed. Numen, 55(4):461– 473. DOI: 1163/156852708X310545

62. Bulbulia, J. (2008). Telling nature. Landfall, 215:180–185.

63. Bulbulia, J. (2008). Free love: Religious solidarity on the cheap. In Bulbulia, J., Sosis, R., Genet, R., Harris, E., Wyman, K., and Genet, C., editors, The Evolution of Religion: Studies, Theories, and Critiques, chapter 18, pages 153–160. Col-lins Foundation Press, Santa Margarita, CA.

64. Bulbulia, J. and Mahoney, A. (2008). Religious solidarity: The hand grenade ex-periment. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 8(3):295–320.DOI: 10.1163/156853708X358191

65. Sosis, R. and Bulbulia, J. (2008). Religion in Eden. In Bulbulia, J., Sosis, R., Genet, R., Harris, E., Wyman, K., and Genet, C., editors, The Evolution of Reli-gion: Studies, Theories, and Critiques, chapter Introduction, pages 15–19. Col-lins Foundation Press, Santa Margarita, CA.

2007

66. Bulbulia, J. (2007). The evolution of religion. In Dunbar, R. and Barrett, L., edi-tors, Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology, chapter 43, pages 621–636. Oxford University Press, New York.

2006

67. Bulbulia, J. (2006). Nature’s medicine: religiosity as an adaptation for health and cooperation. In MacNamara, P., editor, Where Man and God Meet: the new sciences of religion and brain, chapter 5, pages 87–121. Greenwood Pub-lishers, Westwood CT.

pre-2005

68. Bulbulia, J. (2005). Are there any religions? Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, 17(2):71–100. DOI: 10.1163/1570068054305619

69. Bulbulia, J. (2004). Religious costs as adaptations that signal altruistic inten-tion. Evolution and Cognition, 10(1):19–38.

70. Bulbulia, J. (2004). The cognitive and evolutionary psychology of religion. Biol-ogy and Philosophy, 18(5):655–686.

71. Bulbulia, J. (2003). Book review: Nicholas Agar, Life’s Intrinsic Value: Science, Ethics and Nature. Sophia, 42(1):85–89.

72. Bulbulia, J. A. (2003). Review of James Mcclenon: Wondrous Healing: Shaman-ism, Human Evolution and the Origin of Religion. Method & Theory in the Study of Religion, 15(1):100–103. DOI: 10.1163/15700680360549439

73. Bulbulia, J. (2002). Unweaving the religious mind: A review of pascal boyer, re-ligion ex- plained: The evolutionary origins of religious thought. Eras, 4. URL

74. Bulbulia, J. A. (1996). Book review: Hilary Putnam, Words and Life . Koinonia, 8.

Edited collections

75. Bulbulia, J., Sosis, R., Genet, R., Harris, E., Wyman, K., and Genet, C. (2008).The Evolution of Religion: Studies, Theories, and Critiques. Collins Foundation Press, Santa Margarita, CA.

76. Bulbulia, J. and Morris, P. (2004). What is Religion For? Milne, Wellington.

Dissertation

77. Bulbulia, J. (2001). Before Eden. PhD thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.

Editorials (Not peer reviewed)

* Spezio, M. L., Bulbulia, J., Wildman, W., and Sosis, R. (InPress). Religion, SCAN, and developing standards of inquiry. Religion, Brain & Behavior.
* Wildman, W., Sosis, R., Spezio, M. L., and Bulbulia, J. (2015). The emerging psy-chology of religion. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 5(02):89–89.

Awards and achievements

  • 2016 VUW Research Excellence Award
  • 1999-2000, Faculty Fellowship, Princeton University.
  • 1996, Melon Fellowship.
  • 1990, Phi Beta Kappa.

Administrative responsibilities

  • (2011→ongoing) Convener, Animal Ethics Committee, Victoria University.
  • (2008→ongoing) Honours Coordinator, ReligiousStudies, Victoria University.