Faculty of Law

Past Events

Whaling in the Antarctic (Australia v Japan: New Zealand intervening): Observations and Implications for International Law

Date: 17 June 2014

Time: 5.40 pm

Venue: Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1), Rear Courtyard, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


The International Law Association New Zealand Branch in association with The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington School of Law invite you to a discussion on:

Whaling in the Antarctic (Australia v Japan: New Zealand intervening): Observations and Implications for International Law

On 31 March 2014, the International Court of Justice handed down a ground-breaking decision in the Whaling in the Antarctic Case, between Australia and Japan (New Zealand intervening). The ICJ found that Japan’s scientific permit whaling programme in the Southern Ocean breached Japan’s obligations under the Schedule to the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. This seminar will examine the decision in detail. What were the reasons for the ICJ’s conclusions? Can Japan continue to conduct a scientific permit whaling programme in the Southern Ocean? What impact will the decision have on the future of the International Whaling Commission? Can we draw any lessons from this case for other international environmental law issues?

Speakers:

  • Joanna Mossop, Senior Lecturer, VUW School of Law
  • Dr Caroline Foster, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Auckland

RSVPs not required.

Human Rights - Head, Hand and Heart

Date: 21 February 2014

Time: 12.30 pm

Venue: Lecture Theatre 4, Level 1, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


Public Office Holders' Lecture Series

“Human Rights – Head, Hand and Heart”

Public Lecture presented by
David Rutherford
Chief Human Rights Commissioner

David Rutherford took up the five-year appointment as Chief Human Rights Commissioner on September 1, 2011. Before taking up the position Mr Rutherford was the managing director of Special Olympics Asia Pacific and prior to that he was chief executive of the New Zealand Rugby Union. He has worked as a sport and commercial lawyer and lecturer in sports law with a particular focus on human rights law. He is a passionate advocate for sport and promoting the rights of people with disabilities, and also has strong community links with young people and education.

RSVPs are not required.

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Conferences

New Thinking on Sustainability

Date: 14–16 February 2014

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


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New Zealand Centre for Public Law VUW Law School, Wellington, 14-16 February 2014

We are bringing together 3 organisations for a 3-day environment weekend on February 14-16:

German Australian Pacific Lawyers Association and The Earth Law Alliance Aotearoa NZ are combining to hold a conference on New Thinking on Sustainability, from Friday February 14 until Sunday February 16, 2014.

The Resource Management Law Association of New Zealand will also hold the RMLA Academic Advisory Group 2nd annual Symposium for the presentation of recent and forthcoming research on Friday 14th February (9am-4pm).

The New Thinking on Sustainability conference will open with a keynote speech from Klaus Bosselmann on Friday at 5:00. Saturday will be devoted to keynote speeches and plenary panels on environmental bills of rights, on legal incorporation of indigenous perspectives on the environment, and on the effects of climate change.

On Sunday February 16 The Earth Law Alliance will meet to discuss pertinent environmental issues in depth whereas the German Australian Pacific Lawyers Association invites interested lawyers for a breakfast networking meeting.

For a more detailed description of the substantive topic background on environmental crises, a description of the coverage of some of the panels, and bios of the keynote speakers, please click here.

Conference Programme:

Friday 14 February 2014

2-4pm: Public Workshop “Earth Laws for your Community”
Run by Michelle Maloney, Convenor of the Australian Earth Law Alliance

5pm: Conference Opening - Sir Geoffrey Palmer

5pm: Welcome and Opening Speech

5:30-7: Keynote Speech by Professor Klaus Bosselmann (University of Auckland) on “Sustainability Alternatives – A German-NZ Perspective”

7:30: Conference Dinner (Karaka Café, Wellington Waterfront; incl entertainment and Dinner Speaker)

 
Saturday 15 February 2014

[ 9-9:30: Tea/coffee]

9:30 – 10:00: Introduction

10-12:00: Environmental Constitutionalism and Sustainability Bills of Rights
  • Keynote Speech by Linda Sheehan (Earth Law Centre, San Francisco, USA)
  • Panel Discussion: Professor Klaus Bosselmann (University of Auckland)
  • Dr Joel Colon-Rios (VUW)

[12-1pm: Lunch]

2-3pm: Indigenous and Critical Perspectives

  • Keynote Speech: Prof Gerald Torres (University of Texas, Cornell Law School, USA) (Supported by the NZ Law Foundation)
  • Panel Discussion: Dr Jacinta Ruru (Otago), Andrew Erueti (University of Waikato), Linda Te Aho (University of Waikato)

[3-3:30pm: Tea/coffee break]

3:30-5:30pm: Climate Change & Environmental Refugees

  • John Corcoran (University of Waikato): Pacific Island States and Climate Change
  • Alberto Costi (VUW): Legal Issues of Climate Refugees
  • Vernon Rive (AUT): Climate Change Laws and Negotiations
  • Brendan Mackey (Director, Griffith Climate Change Response Program, Griffith University, Australia): Climate Change: What we need do differently

5:30-6pm: Closing Remarks: Catherine Iorns Magallanes (VUW)

6-7pm: drinks & nibbles [8pm: Karori Sanctuary By Night tour; for a separate fee OR: Earth Law Alliance inaugural AGM (over dinner, tba)]

Sunday 16 February 2014

8:45-10:30am: Planetary Boundaries and Sustainability

  • Brendan Mackey (Director, Griffith Climate Change Response Program, Griffith University, Australia) “Can planetary boundaries help operationalize Earth system law?”
  • Michelle Maloney (Griffith University, Australia) “Ecological Limits, Earth Jurisprudence and Planetary Boundaries”
  • Cath Wallace (VUW/ECO) “Sustainability – wash your mouth out! The removal of sustainability from New Zealand law in the pursuit of economic objectives”
  • Ben Gussen (University of Auckland) “Reflections on the relationship between the principle of sustainability and subsidiarity”

[10:30-11am: Morning Tea break]

11am-1pm: Social Resistance & Civil Disobedience

  • Peter Burdon (Uuniversity of Adelaide) “Why Earth Justice Needs Civil Disobedience”
  • John Parnell (Solicitor, Wellington) “Philosophies of Civil Disobedience”
  • Janice Gray & David Brown (UNSW) “Constituencies of resistance to coal seam gas mining, the political art of suture and the public good”

[1-2pm: Lunch]

2-3:30pm: (2 concurrent panels)

A: Adopting Earth Laws

  • Nicole Rogers (Southern Cross University) “Developing a Wild Law Judgment Project”
  • Gay Morgan (University of Waikato) “Writing Earth-centred Laws and Judgments”
  • Ngozi Finette Stewart (University of Benin, Nigeria) “Promoting Development, Preserving the Environment: Crusading a win-win legislative response to the sustainable development ‘Paradox’"

B: Law Change for Climate Change

  • Tom Bennion (Barrister, Wellington) “Impediments to Environmental Protection in NZ courts and legal processes”
  • John Iloabuchi Amadi (University of Auckland) “Climate Refugees or CliMates? Defining the Legal Status of Environmentally Displaced Persons”
  • Greg Severinson (VUW) “'Legislative Design for Novel Climate Industries in NZ'”

3:30-5pm: (2 concurrent panels)

A: Eco-constitutionalism

  • Betsan Martin (Response, NZ) “Incorporating Responsibility in Laws and Governance”
  • Daniel Kelly (University of Auckland) “Supporting Strong Sustainability: Eco-constitutionalism in a New Zealand Context”
  • Thiti Waikavee (University of Auckland) “Ecological Covenants for Sustainable Governance”

B: Social Resistance & Civil Disobedience, cont.

  • Stephen Iorns (Chair) (Barrister, Wellington) “Civil Disobedience: A practical guide”
  • Peter Burdon (University of Adelaide) “Radical Social Resistance Movements”
  • Valerie Morse (Peace activist, Wellington) "Social Resistance Movements in NZ"
  • Jessie Dennis (Representing 350.org) “Environmental Cause Civil Disobedience”

Conference side events:

1. Public Seminar: “Oil Spills in the Niger Delta: Corporate Responsibility for Environment and Human Rights"
Thursday, February 13, 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm, OGB LT1, VUW Law School.
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Speakers:
Grant Bayldon (Executive Director of Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand), speaking on the recent Amnesty International fact-finding report on the Niger Delta.
Ngozi Stewart (PhD, Lecturer in Law at the University of Benin, Nigeria), speaking on eco-constitutional aspects of environmental protection in the Niger Delta.
Petra Butler (Ass. Prof, VUW Law School), speaking on corporate social responsibility.
Chaired by: Diana Shand (IUCN: Vice-President, 2008-2012, & Regional Councillor-Oceania, 2004-2012.)
For full information on this event please see this page.

2. Public Workshop: “Earth Laws for your Community”
Friday, February 14, 2 pm – 4 pm, Moot Room, VUW Law School
Public Workshop run by Michelle Maloney, Convenor of the Australian Earth Law Alliance, covering an introduction to Earth Law and how communities might utilise Earth Law principles as the basis for devising new rules of governance. Attendance will be free but registration will be required, as space is limited. For registration please e-mail anna.burnett@vuw.ac.nz.

3. Resource Management Law Association, Academic Advisory Group, Second Annual Symposium
Friday, February 14, 10 am – 4 pm, G34, VUW Law School
Membership of the RMLA Academic Advisory Group is inclusive, and is open to all legal academics teaching in NZ universities who have an interest in researching or teaching environmental law. Contact Trevor Daya-Winterbottom for more details on attendance and participation: daya.winterbottom@xtra.co.nz

4. Workshop on Teaching and Learning for Sustainability
Monday, February 17, 10 am – 12 pm, Moot Room, VUW Law School
A pedagogical workshop focused on best practices for teaching sustainability. It will be interdisciplinary, and facilitated by the VUW Department of Education and the VUW Centre for Academic Development. For presentation and attendance, please e-mail Sue.Cornforth@vuw.ac.nz.

5. Workshop on Policies and Law for New Zealand Conservation and Environment
Monday, February 17, 10 am – 5 pm, OGB room G34, VUW Law School
Invitation-only workshop, with limited places. Please register interest with ECO - Environment and Conservation Organisations of New Zealand – via email: eco@eco.org.nz.


To register for the Conference please click here.

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    NZCPL: Unearthing New Zealand’s Constitutional Traditions

    Date: 29–30 August 2013

    Time: 9.00 am

    Venue: Parliament Buildings, Wellington - Hosted by Hon Chris Finlayson QC, Attorney-General of New Zealand


    To view sessions from this conference, please see the link below:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfCmAfN40pT8BJsrgIe4NwA

     

    nzcpl-conf-2013-poster-draft

    Registrations now open, please see the form at the bottom of the page.

    It is often said that New Zealand’s dominant constitutional tradition is pragmatism – the “number eight wire” approach to constitutional change. But this hides other, and often richer, narratives from our constitutional past. This conference seeks to take a deeper look at, and to shed more light on, the fundamental ideals on which our constitution is based. It will carry on the Centre for Public Law’s own tradition of inquiry into our constitution by bringing together a number of distinguished scholars from New Zealand and abroad to reflect on these important questions and to begin unearthing the country’s traditions of constitutional thought.

    Keynote speakers:

    Professor David Hackett Fischer, University Professor and Earl Warren Professor of History at Brandeis University

    Emeritus Professor Andrew Sharp, Fellow in New Zealand Studies at Birkbeck College, University of London/ University of Auckland

    Opening Address: Rt Hon Dame Sian Elias, Chief Justice of New Zealand

    Confirmed speakers include

    • Professor Richard Boast, Victoria University of Wellington 
    • Dr Petra Butler, Victoria University of Wellington
    • Professor Shaunnagh Dorsett, University of Technology Sydney
    • Dr Kirsty Gover, Melbourne Law School
    • Dr Mark Hickford, Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet
    • Catherine Iorns, Victoria University of Wellington
    • Moana Jackson, Te Wananga o Raukawa
    • Dr Carwyn Jones, Victoria University of Wellington
    • Professor Philip Joseph, University of Canterbury
    • Rt Hon Sir Kenneth Keith, International Court of Justice
    • Professor Geoff McLay, Law Commission/Victoria University of Wellington
    • Professor Janet McLean, The University of Auckland
    • Dr Grant Morris, Victoria University of Wellington 
    • Rt Hon Sir Geoffrey Palmer QC, Victoria University of Wellington
    • Dr Matthew Palmer, Thorndon Chambers
    • Professor Tony Smith, Victoria University of Wellington
    • Mamari Stephens, Victoria University of Wellington
    • Dr Damen Ward, Crown Law Office
    • Professor David Williams, The University of Auckland

    For more information or to register, please contact: Events Coordinator, New Zealand Centre for Public Law, +64-4-4636327, nzcpl@vuw.ac.nz

    The NZ Centre for Public Law wishes to acknowledge the generous financial support of the NZ Law Foundation for this event.

    All PDF documents require Acrobat Reader

    Document File size File type
     Programme and Registration 331 KB PDF

     

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    Recalibrating Behaviour: Smarter Regulation in a Global World

    Date: 23–24 April 2013

    Time: 9.00 am

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 1, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington

     

    With Keynote Speakers:

    Professor Fiona Haines, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne

    and

    Professor Jonathan B Wiener, Law School, Nicholas School of the Environment, and Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University

     

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    Please click here to view the full Conference Programme.

    For a copy of the registration form see below.

    Document File Size File Type
    Registration form 490KB PDF

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    Public Lectures

    Intellectual Capital Management: A Heuristic for Value Articulation

    Date: 22 August 2014

    Time: 12.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 3 (RHLT3), Rutherford House, 23 Lambton Quay, Wellington

    Public Lecture Presented By
    Professor Clint Francis
    Northwestern University School of Law

    In the information age, ideas and innovation are the principal drivers of economic growth and competitive advantage. In this context, the agile management of intellectual capital can be the difference between business success and failure. While knowledge of property, contract and corporations is an important part of intellectual capital management, an understanding of legal doctrine without a larger strategic plan for how it should be used, combined, and integrated into action does not adequately prepare businesses to tackle the challenge. The goal of the presentation is to provide the strategic planning skills necessary to harness the full power of intellectual capital and to convert this into industry dominance and positions of strength in new industries.

    Professor Francis will outline a heuristic for development of optimal intellectual capital strategy, which he will illustrate with a plan to facilitate Samsung Electronics’ recent announced goal that healthcare is its next-generation enterprise and with examples drawn from other businesses. The heuristic adopts a four-stage approach – innovation, appropriation, articulation, and iteration – which embraces the following: the defining of a future innovation trajectory; creation and appropriation of intellectual capital over the three potential dimensions of product value – function, expression and brand; the transfer of value from one product-value dimension to another (back and forth across sites of patents, trade secrets, designs, trade dress and trademarks); the sequenced migration of intellectual capital to other products – derivative, complementary, next-generation, etc. – and its leverage through building new platform and network products; the implementation of optimal governance of product value chain management; and the strategic interception of new industries. The heuristic is designed with the goal that application of this four-stage approach will guide businesses to produce an intellectual capital strategy that will increase enterprise value and sustainability.
    About Professor Clint Francis

    Professor Francis is a tenured member of the faculty of Northwestern University School of Law. He currently teaches and researches in the areas of Corporate Restructuring/Bankruptcy, Commercial Law, Intellectual Property, Intellectual Capital Management, Medical Innovation, and Value Chain Management. Professor Francis obtained his initial legal training in New Zealand, where he completed LLB and LLM degrees, and was admitted as a Barrister and Solicitor of the New Zealand Supreme Court. After teaching at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, Professor Francis completed a Doctorate in Law (SJD) at the University of Virginia School Of Law, with fellowships from the Fulbright and DuPont Foundations. He came to Northwestern from University of California Berkeley Law School, where he taught as an associate. Since joining the Northwestern University School of Law faculty in 1978, Professor Francis has been the recipient of numerous teaching awards and has served on and chaired a variety of University and Law School committees. He teaches courses offered together with Kellogg School of Management, participates in executive training programs and regularly teaches at KAIST Graduate School of Management in Seoul, South Korea. He has served on the boards of several corporations and undertakes select professional consulting assignments. 2002.

    The Peaceful Settlement ... of International Disputes ... Some Reflections on Negotiating, Mediating, Arbitrating and Judging

    Date: 14 August 2014

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 3, Ground Floor, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    The Australian and New Zealand Society of International Law along with The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington School of Law invites you to

    The Peaceful Settlement ... of International Disputes ... Some Reflections on Negotiating, Mediating, Arbitrating and Judging

    Four experienced practitioners will engage in a discussion of cases involving New Zealand and New Zealander lawyers. Among the matters are whaling, South Pacific fisheries, maritime delimitation, trade and investment and the Rainbow Warrior.

    Speakers

    • Bill Mansfield– International Law Association New Zealand Branch
    • Penelope Ridings – New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade
    • Professor Campbell McLachlan – Victoria University of Wellington
    • Sir Kenneth Keith - Judge, International Court of Justice

    Please confirm your attendance by responding to law-events@vuw.ac.nz by Wednesday 13 August 2014.

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    Litigating Climate Change

    Date: 28 July 2014

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 1 (GBLT1), Rear Courtyard, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington School of Law
    invite you to a public lecture:

    Litigating Climate Change
    Presented by
    Professor Gerald Torres

    Climate change cases are already being handled by USA courts. The most prominent are the atmospheric trust cases currently being brought by youth and supported by James Hansen and other scientists. These cases are asking the courts to compel government to take meaningful action to protect the atmosphere for current and future generations. There have also been liability suits suggested - and at least one filed - over the effects of climate change. Professor Torres will discuss the range of cases being brought and suggested in the USA, focusing on the atmospheric trust litigation and the public trust doctrine which underlies it.

    Gerald Torres is Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law, Cornell Law School. Professor Torres is former president of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). Previously, he was the Bryant Smith Chair at the University of Texas. He is a leading figure in critical race theory, environmental law and federal Indian Law. Torres has served as deputy assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., and as counsel to then U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno. His book, THE MINER'S CANARY: ENLISTING RACE, RESISTING POWER, TRANSFORMING DEMOCRACY (Harvard University Press, 2002) with Harvard law professor Lani Guinier, was described by Publisher's Weekly as "one of the most provocative and challenging books on race produced in years." Torres' many articles include Changing the Wind (Yale Law Review, 2014); The Public Trust: The Law’s DNA (Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy, 2014); Translation and Stories (Harvard Law Review, 2002), Who Owns the Sky? (Pace Law Review, 2001) (Garrison Lecture), Taking and Giving: Police Power, Public Value, and Private Right (Environmental Law, 1996), and Translating Yonnondio by Precedent and Evidence: The Mashpee Indian Case (Duke Law Journal, 1990). Torres has served on the board of the Environmental Law Institute, the National Petroleum Council and on EPA's National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. He was the founding Board Chair of the Advancement Project, the nation’s leading racial and social justice organization. He is currently Vice Chair of Earth Day Network as well as serves on the Board of the Natural Resources Defense Council. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Law Institute. Torres was honored with the 2004 Legal Service Award from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) for his work to advance the legal rights of Latinos. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard, Stanford and Yale law schools.

    This lecture is sponsored by The New Zealand Law Foundation.

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    Collection and Retention of DNA from Suspects in New Zealand

    Date: 14 April 2014

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3), Ground Floor, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington School of Law
    invite you to a public lecture:

    Collection and Retention of DNA from Suspects in New Zealand
    Presented by
    Dr. Liz Campbell and Dr. Nessa Lynch

    Forensic analysis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is now integral to the prevention, detection and prosecution of crime in New Zealand. The collection and retention of DNA by the State was given statutory basis by the Criminal Investigation (Blood Samples) Act 1995, which is now, after major reforms in 2003 and 2009, referred to as the Criminal Investigation (Bodily Samples) Act. Despite the fact that many thousands of samples are surrendered by, or compulsorily acquired from, suspects in New Zealand every year, and that the scope of the power to acquire samples has markedly expanded in recent years, there is a paucity of legal commentary on the issue in the New Zealand context.
    The focus of this lecture is the scope of the power to acquire DNA from suspects in New Zealand, but the discussion is informed by comparative analysis. It is widely acknowledged that the collection of DNA from a suspect involves a significant intrusion on individual rights such the right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure. The question then becomes whether the intrusion is justified given the societal interest in the prevention, detection and prosecution of crime and, whether it is reasonable.


    Dr. Nessa Lynch is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Law, Victoria University of Wellington. She teaches and researches in the areas of youth justice, criminal law and sentencing. She has published nationally and internationally, and her book Youth Justice in New Zealand was published in 2013. She was recently the recipient of a VUW Early Career Research Excellence Award.


    Dr. Liz Campbell is senior lecturer in criminal law and evidence at the University of Edinburgh. Her principal area of research is criminal law/justice, with a particular interest in the legal responses to organised crime, DNA databases, and the presumption of innocence. Liz has published widely, and her monograph Organised Crime and the Law: A Comparative Analysis was published by Hart in 2013.

    New Zealand’s Long-Term Fiscal Outlook - Rebecca Prebble

    Date: 10 April 2014

    Time: 2.40 pm

    Venue: GBLT4, Law Faculty, Old Government Building, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    Professor ATH Smith, Pro-Vice Chancellor and Dean of Law, invites alumni and friends of Victoria University of Wellington to a Public Lecture on 10 April 2014:

    New Zealand’s Long-Term Fiscal Outlook
    Rebecca Prebble

    Senior Analyst, The Treasury

    Section 26N of the Public Finance Act 1989 charges the New Zealand Treasury with publishing its fiscal outlook for the next 40 years. This lecture, part of the Victoria University programme on taxation law, presents Affording our Future, the Treasury’s most recent Statement on the Long-Term Fiscal Position, released in July 2013. The lecture will have an emphasis on taxation aspects.


    Rebecca Prebble, BA (Hons), LLB (Hons) (VUW), LLM (Columbia), a Senior Analyst at the New Zealand Treasury, graduated from Victoria University with a double first in law and philosophy. She practised as a solicitor in Wellington, specializing in taxation and banking law, before taking the LLM at Columbia University, New York, where she was named a Kent Scholar.
    Ms Prebble returned to New Zealand in 2009, joining the Treasury’s Regulatory Quality team. More recently she has worked on fiscal policy as a member of the Macroeconomic and Fiscal Policy team, where she led the project to prepare Affording our Future.


    Izard Weston Lecture Theatre (LT 4) Law Faculty, Old Government Building, 55 Lambton Quay, first floor, north-east corner of the building. The most convenient doors are the Bunny Street entrance, opposite Rutherford House, and the courtyard entrance, at the north-west corner of the courtyard, where there is also a wheelchair ramp.

    Attendance is free, but please register by responding to law.events@vuw.ac.nz by April 9. Reservations will be acknowledged.

    Renewable Energy Futures: Challenges for Law and Business

    Date: 8 April 2014

    Time: 12.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3), Ground Floor, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington School of Law invite you to a lecture:

    Renewable Energy Futures: Challenges for Law and Business

    Presented by Dr. Eric Martinot

    Senior research director, Institute for Sustainable Energy Policies, Tokyo, adjunct teaching associate, Victoria University of Wellington, and lead author, REN21 Renewable Energy Policy Network
    Driven by a growing number of policies in over 120 countries around the world over the past 20 years, renewable energy has become mainstreamed. Over $250 billion was invested in renewable energy last year, about the same as global investment in conventional power generation. Wind power in China already produces as much electricity as nuclear. Scenarios and country policy targets show much higher shares of renewables worldwide in the future. But a turning point is being reached, and a new generation of regulatory frameworks and business models will need to evolve, directed at the integration of renewable energy into buildings, transport, industry, and power grids. This includes, for example, power market rules for distributed and peer-to-peer solar, contracts for power-demand flexibility, building materials standards and codes, and electric vehicle charging policies. Opportunities and challenges for law and practice in New Zealand will be explored.

    Dr. Eric Martinot is an internationally recognized writer, scholar, and speaker on the subject of renewable energy. He has authored 70 publications on sustainable energy over the past 25 years, and is best known for creating and writing as lead author from 2005-2010 the standard global reference, the REN21 Renewables Global Status Report. Most recently he researched and wrote the REN21 Renewables Global Futures Report, including interviews with 170 leading experts worldwide. He lived in Beijing for three years as senior visiting scholar with Tsinghua University, where he also taught graduate courses on sustainable energy. He was formerly a senior energy specialist with the World Bank, and holds a Ph.D. in Energy and Resources from the University of California Berkeley and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His renewable energy information web site is www.martinot.info.

    RSVPs are not required.

    To view a recording of the lecture, please click the link below:

    https://vstream.victoria.ac.nz/ess/echo/presentation/918ffb58-003c-4667-9296-f9421a15f308

    Constitutional Collision: Fitzgerald v Muldoon v Wild

    Date: 24 March 2014

    Time: 5.35 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 2, Rear Courtyard, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay


    The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington School of Law
    invite you to a public lecture:

    Constitutional Collision: Fitzgerald v Muldoon v Wild
    Presented by the Hon Justice Stephen Kós

    Based on new access to Cabinet and Crown Law files, and interviews with surviving participants, Justice Kos illuminates the legal and political history of, and personalities at odds in, New Zealand's most famous public law case. This lecture was first given at the Australia-New Zealand Legal History conference at Otago University in November, to wide acclaim.


    Justice Stephen Kós graduated LLB (Hons) from Victoria University in 1981 (winning the Chapman Tripp Centenary Prize for his graduating year) and LLM from Cambridge University in 1985. He was a junior lecturer in law at Victoria University 1980-82, a partner in the Wellington firm Perry Wylie Pope & Page 1985-88, and a litigation partner at Russell McVeagh 1988-2005. He was chairman of partners of that firm 2003-05. Justice Kós joined the independent bar in 2005, and was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 2007. He was one of the founding members of Stout Street Chambers in Wellington. He had a wide trial and appellate practice in commercial, contract, equity, competition, environmental and public law litigation. At the time of his appointment Justice Kós was also the Pro-Chancellor of Massey University, Honorary Lecturer in Law at Victoria University and Chairman of the New Zealand Markets Disciplinary Tribunal, the stock exchange disciplinary tribunal. He was appointed to the High Court in April 2011 and sits in Wellington.

    To view a recording of the lecture, please click the link below:

    https://vstream.victoria.ac.nz/ess/echo/presentation/c3c2ea33-2033-4855-9b45-6844c9292693

    Constitutional Necessity or Constant Nuisance?

    Date: 28 January 2014

    Time: 12.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 3, Ground Floor, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    Exploring 10 years of challenge for the independent crown entity model and the Privacy Commissioner

    Valedictory Lecture presented by

    Marie Shroff, Privacy Commissioner

    Marie Shroff was appointed to the independent statutory position of Privacy Commissioner in September 2003 for a term of five years and in 2008 was reappointed for a further five years. Prior to joining the Office, she held the position of Secretary of the Cabinet/Clerk of the Executive Council for 16 years.

    Linda Clark discusses the establishment of the Jerusalem Arbitration Centre with Prof Catherine Rogers

    Date: 28 November 2013

    Time: 6.00 pm

    Venue: GBLT3, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington

     Professor Catherine Rogers

    Linda Clark will talk with Professor Catherine Rogers (pictured above), interview style, about the establishment of the Jerusalem Arbitration Centre (JAC).

    Professor Rogers was heavily involved in the establishment of JAC, an initiative that has been described as a ‘ground-breaking dispute resolution forum designed to foster trade and perhaps a greater level of cooperation between Israelis and Palestinians’.

    This event will commence with refreshments at 6pm, which will lead into the discussion session with Linda Clark and Professor Rogers beginning at 6.30pm.

    While in New Zealand, Professor Rogers will present papers in Auckland and Wellington, further details below:

    Professor Rogers' visit is sponsored by the New Zealand Law Foundation.

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    Beeby Colloquium on International Law

    Date: 15 November 2013

    Time: 12.00 pm

    Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Theatre 2, 23 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade
    and
    the International Law Association (New Zealand Branch)
    invite interested persons to attend the

    BEEBY COLLOQUIUM ON INTERNATIONAL LAW

    Public Lecture presented by
    Ambassador Colin Keating
    Special Envoy of the New Zealand Prime Minister for the United Nations Security Council
    The UN Security Council: An International Legal Perspective


    About the speaker
    From 2005-2011 Colin Keating was the founding Executive Director of the independent Security Council monitoring organisation in New York. In that context, he worked closely with the South African Mission in New York and also visited South Africa. He was concurrently a Senior Research Fellow at Columbia University in New York.

    Formerly, Mr Keating was a senior New Zealand diplomat, serving in many positions including Chief Legal Adviser of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Deputy-Secretary of the Ministry.

    From 1993 to 1996, he was the New Zealand Ambassador to the UN in New York. He represented New Zealand on the Security Council in 1993 and 1994.

    Mr Keating was the President of the Security Council during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and has been widely recognised for leadership and advocacy at that time in trying to secure a timely and effective response by the United Nations. He led the Security Council Mission to Somalia in 1994 and was recognised by African Missions in New York as a Security Council member who always made African issues a top priority. He was actively involved in UN reform, serving as Co-Chair of the General Assembly working group dealing with reform at that time. Upon his return to New Zealand from New York, Mr Keating was appointed in 1997 as the Secretary of Justice of New Zealand.

    From 2000-2004 Mr Keating worked in the private sector in New Zealand as a partner in legal practice. Mr Keating has served as a member of the New Zealand Government Legal Aid Commission and the Electoral Commission. He has been a board member of the Foundation for the United Nations Association of New Zealand and of Amnesty International’s New Zealand Section.

    RSVP’s are not required for this Public Lecture

    100 Years of the Peace Palace by Sir Kenneth Keith

    Date: 27 August 2013

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre Two, Rutherford House Victoria University Pipitea Campus (23 Lambton Quay, Wellington)


    100 Years of the Peace Palace: Prospects for the International Adjudication and Arbitration

    In this address Judge Sir Kenneth Keith, one of the 15 members of the International Court of Justice which since 1946 has sat in the Great Hall of Justice in the Peace Palace will attempt to draw lessons for the future. He will consider the experience of that Court, its predecessor, the Permanent Court of International Justice (1922-1946), the Permanent Court of Arbitration (1899- ) for which the building was constructed, and the many other Courts and Tribunals which have been established over the last century and earlier, but especially in recent decades. What are their strengths and limits? What improvements might be considered? Should greater attention be given to other methods for the peaceful settlement of international disputes? How are these matters to be seen in the context of the dreadful events which followed only a year after the opening of the Palace dedicated to Peace through Law?

    Sir Kenneth Keith is the first New Zealander to be elected as a Judge of the International court of Justice. He was elected by the UN General Assembly and Security Council in 2005 to serve a nine-year term. He served earlier as a judge of the New Zealand Court of Appeal and Supreme Court (1996-2006) and a judge of appeal in Samoa, the Cook Islands, Niue and Fiji; a member of arbitration tribunals; a law commissioner in New Zealand; Professor and Dean of Law at Victoria University of Wellington (now Professor Emeritus); and a member of the legal offices of the United Nations and MFAT. He was a member of the New Zealand legal team in the Nuclear Tests cases before the ICJ in 1973, 1974 and 1995 and the international arbitral tribunals in the Rainbow Warrior (1990) and Southern Bluefin Tuna (2000) cases. He has published extensively on international law, sits on the Board of Editors of a number of law reviews, and is a member of a wide range of law institutes and associations (including the American Law Institute and the British Institute of International and Comparative Law). He is a past President of the NZIIA (2000-2007).

    Entry to Rutherford House is via Bunny Street or Lambton Quay. See grid c/d-10 on the Pipitea campus map.
    RSVP not required.

    Technological Commons through Public Norms and Private Ordering

    Date: 16 July 2013

    Time: 5.45 pm

    Venue: Royal Society of New Zealand, 11 Turnbull Street, Thorndon (cnr Turnbull & Murphy Streets)


    Professor Peter Lee

    UC Davis School of Law

    This public lecture, which is co-sponsored by Victoria University’s Faculty of Law and the Royal Society of New Zealand, will explore how public institutions can leverage their contributions of money, labour, and even biological materials to enhance access to new inventions, thus creating a technological commons that serves research and humanitarian ends. The model presented by Professor Lee challenges the traditional, market-based nature of the patent system. This lecture will explore how governments, universities, and nonprofit organizations are leveraging the tools of market-based quid pro quos, conditioning contributions of money, labor, and biological materials on recipients’ agreements to make resulting patented technologies widely available for qualified purposes—while still maintaining patent law’s built-in incentives for invention and innovation. In this sense, the emerging technological commons is the product of a compelling combination of public norms and private ordering.

    A graduate of Harvard University and Yale Law School, Peter Lee is a Professor of Law and Chancellor’s Fellow at UC Davis School of Law. An expert in patent law, he has written extensively on patents in biomedical research and university-industry technology transfer. He is a leading voice on the intersection of science and society and the patent system’s impact on scientific and technological progress. His scholarship has appeared in leading journals such as The Yale Law Journal, California Law Review, and Michigan Law Review, and has received numerous awards, including the UC Davis Chancellor’s Fellowship and the Samsung-Stanford Patent Prize.

    The lecture will be chaired by Professor Graeme Austin, Victoria University Faculty of Law, and introduced by Dean Peterson, Manager of Research Funding at the Royal Society of New Zealand.

    Seating is limited, so please RSVP: Anna.Burnett@vuw.ac.nz to reserve a place.

    Is there an Obama-Clinton Doctrine?

    Date: 15 July 2013

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 1, Old Government Buildings,55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    Public Lecture presented by

    Professor Harold Hongju Koh

    Sterling Professor of International Law

    Harold Hongju Koh is Sterling Professor of International Law at Yale Law School. He returned to Yale Law School in January 2013 after serving for more than three years as Legal Adviser to the U.S. Department of State.

    Professor Koh is one of the country’s leading experts in public and private international law, national security law, and human rights. He first began teaching at Yale Law School in 1985 and served as Dean from 2004 until 2009, when he took leave as the Martin R. Flug ’55 Professor of International Law to join the State Department. From 1993 to 2009, he was the Gerard C. & Bernice Latrobe Smith Professor of International Law at Yale Law School, and from 1998 to 2001, he served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.

    He has received thirteen honorary degrees and more than thirty awards for his human rights work, including awards from Columbia Law School and the American Bar Association for his lifetime achievements in international law. He has authored or co-authored eight books, published more than 180 articles, testified before Congress, and litigated numerous cases involving international law issues. He is a Fellow of the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council of the American Law Institute.

    He holds a B.A. degree from Harvard College and B.A. and M.A. degrees from Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar. He earned his J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was Developments Editor of the Harvard Law Review. He served as a law clerk for Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the United States Supreme Court and Judge Malcolm Richard Wilkey of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

    Please RSVP to nzcpl@vuw.ac.nz to confirm your attendance.

    View the lecture.

    Beyond the Final Frontier: Latest Developments in Space Law

    Date: 5 July 2013

    Time: 12.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 1, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    Institute for Governance and Policy Studies and the New Zealand Centre for Public Law invite you to a Public Lecture presented by Chris Newman PhD, PG Cert, LPC, PGDip, BA (Hons)

    Chris is currently Senior Lecturer in Law at Sunderland University, UK. He originally worked as both a Detective in the Metropolitan Police Service and subsequently as a Solicitor, working in private practice in the fields of Criminal Law, Human Rights and Family Law. Chris’s PhD thesis was based around a comparative analysis of low-level public order (disorderly conduct) provisions in England, USA, Germany and Australia.

    Chris is Europe’s leading legal expert on Space Law. He has crafted the UK’s first module in Space Law, which examines a number of issues relating to the legal aspects of exploring Space, both Lower Earth Orbit and beyond. Chris is currently researching issues relating to military exploitation of space, the increasing commercialisation of space and the potential role of the criminal law in issues relating to space exploration. Chris has appeared on numerous media outlets in relation to his pioneering work in this field including Radio 4; BBC news; and Sky News. He also has his own blog, which documents his on-going interests.

    NZCPL Public Lecture

    Date: 12 June 2013

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: GBLT1

    Catherine J Iorns Magallanes

    Eco-constitutionalism: Recognising Environmental Rights and Values in a Constitution

    Constitutions around the world are increasingly including statements of environmental protection, both rights to healthy environments and obligations to protect them. This talk will address the various ways that a constitution can uphold environmental protections, including environmental human rights, responsibilities to protect the environment, and rights of the environment itself. It will discuss overseas examples of these various mechanisms and what might be used in the New Zealand context. It is intended to enable participants to make relevant submissions to the Constitutional Advisory Panel on appropriate constitutional protections for the environment in Aotearoa New Zealand.

    About the speaker:

    Catherine Iorns is a Senior Lecturer in Law at Victoria University of Wellington. She teaches, researches and writes on environmental law topics, including environmental rights. Her recent work in this area includes a chapter on the exclusion and inclusion of indigenous environmental values in Western legal systems ("Native American Values and Laws of Exclusion," in Environmental Law and Contrasting Ideas of Nature: A Constructivist Approach, K Hirokawa (ed), forthcoming, Cambridge UP, 2013). She is a member of the National Executive Committee of ECO (Environment and Conservation Organisations of New Zealand), and an International Adviser to Nepal's Green Forum, as well as a national Governance Team member of Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand and a National Committee member of UN Women Aotearoa New Zealand.

    NZCPL Debate Series: Debate Five: “Time to be a Republic?”

    Date: 6 May 2013

    Time: 6.30 pm

    Venue: Hunter Council Chamber

    Broadcast times: Radio NZ National, 4pm Sunday 12 May, repeated 9pm Tuesday 14 May

    During April and May, the NZ Centre for Public Law (with generous support and funding from the NZ Law Foundation) will host a series of debates on issues raised by the Government’s review of the New Zealand constitution. The debates will be broadcast on Radio NZ National. Join us on VUW Kelburn campus to be part of our live public audience.

    "Time to be a Republic?"

    Moderator: Steven Price, barrister

    Speakers: Lewis Holden, Professor Janet McLean, Michael Mabbett

    Is it time to replace the Queen as our head of state and become a republic? If not, will it ever be? What would that involve, and what will be the major issues confronting us if and when we do so?

    Audio podcast of debate five:


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    NZCPL Debate Series: Debate Four: “Human rights in the constitution”

    Date: 29 April 2013

    Time: 6.30 pm

    Venue: Hunter Council Chamber

    Broadcast times: Radio NZ National, 4pm Sunday 5 May, repeated 9pm Tuesday 7 May

    During April and May, the NZ Centre for Public Law (with generous support and funding from the NZ Law Foundation) will host a series of debates on issues raised by the Government’s review of the New Zealand constitution. The debates will be broadcast on Radio NZ National. Join us on VUW Kelburn campus to be part of our live public audience.

    “Human rights in the constitution”

    Moderator: Steven Price, barrister

    Speakers: Professor Andrew Geddis, Jack Hodder QC, Stephen Whittington, Professor Margaret Wilson

    New Zealand has no formal written constitution and its bill of rights is an ordinary law that cannot be used to strike down other laws. Should our Bill of Rights be entrenched and supreme law, or not? Should we have one at all? If so, what other rights should it include? Or not include? In broader terms, what steps ought to be taken to protect the human rights of New Zealanders?

    Audio podcast of debate four:

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    NZCPL Debate Series: Debate Three: “Māori aspirations for constitutional change”

    Date: 22 April 2013

    Time: 6.30 pm

    Venue: Te Herenga Waka Marae

    Broadcast times: Radio NZ National, 4pm Sunday 28 April, repeated 9pm Tuesday 30 April

    During April and May, the NZ Centre for Public Law (with generous support and funding from the NZ Law Foundation) will host a series of debates on issues raised by the Government’s review of the New Zealand constitution. The debates will be broadcast on Radio NZ National. Join us on VUW Kelburn campus to be part of our live public audience.

    "Māori aspirations for constitutional change"

    Moderator: Steven Price, barrister

    Speakers: Tai Ahu, Dr Rawinia Higgins, Veronica Tawhai, Valmaine Toki

    Four newer voices from the Māori community discuss the nature of Māori aspirations for constitutional change, broadly conceived. The discussion will move well beyond the status of the Treaty of Waitangi, and include consideration of alternative models of Māori-Crown relationships, the development of a kaupapa Māori or tikanga-based constitution, and Māori constitutional aspirations in the context of indigenous peoples’ rights at the international level.

    Audio podcast of debate three below:

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    NZCPL Debate Series: Debate Two: “Reforming our democratic institutions”

    Date: 15 April 2013

    Time: 6.30 pm

    Venue: Hunter Council Chamber

    Broadcast times: Radio NZ National, 4pm Sunday 21 April, repeated 9pm Tuesday 23 April

    During April and May, the NZ Centre for Public Law (with generous support and funding from the NZ Law Foundation) will host a series of debates on issues raised by the Government’s review of the New Zealand constitution. The debates will be broadcast on Radio NZ National. Join us on VUW Kelburn campus to be part of our live public audience.

    “Reforming our democratic institutions”

    Moderator: Steven Price, barrister

    Speakers: Dr Maria Bargh, Colin James, Professor Elizabeth McLeay, Sir Geoffrey Palmer QC

    The constitutional review’s terms of reference include the term of Parliament (and whether it should be fixed), the size of Parliament, the size and number of electorates, and issues relating to Māori electoral representation. The debatees will cover these issues and others that they consider important to the quality and effectiveness of our democratic system.

    Audio podcast of debate two:

    Law Foundation Logo


    NZCPL Debate Series: Debate One: “What’s the problem?”

    Date: 8 April 2013

    Time: 6.30 pm

    Venue: Hunter Council Chamber

    Broadcast times: Radio NZ National, 4pm Sunday 14 April, repeated 9am Tuesday 16 April

    During April and May, the NZ Centre for Public Law (with generous support and funding from the NZ Law Foundation) will host a series of debates on issues raised by the Government’s review of the New Zealand constitution. The debates will be broadcast on Radio NZ National. Join us on VUW Kelburn campus to be part of our live public audience.

    "What’s the problem?"

    Moderator: Steven Price, barrister

    Speakers: Professor Bruce Harris, Dr Carwyn Jones, Dame Claudia Orange, Dr Matthew Palmer

    An examination of the origins of the constitutional review, and the process set up to support it. Should we be cynical about its political motives, embrace it as an opportunity for public engagement, neither or both? Do its terms of reference make sense? Is a process like this necessary or desirable? Has the process been set up in a way that could support real change?


    Audio podcast of debate one below:


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    Rights, Wrong and Proportionality

    Date: 25 March 2013

    Time: 5.45 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 2, Rutherford House, 23 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    Public Lecture presented by the 2013 Borrin Fellow: Sir Paul Walker

    Born in Wellington, Sir Paul Walker was educated at St Peter’s College, Adelaide and Magdalen College, Oxford. He was called to the bar of England and Wales in 1979, took silk in 1999 and was appointed as a Justice of the High Court of England and Wales in 2004. He was President of the Administrative Appeals Chamber of the Upper Tribunal from 2009 to 2012 and is a bencher of Gray’s Inn.

    From 1994 to 1996 he was a Senior Lecturer at Victoria University’s Faculty of Law and was the first Director of the New Zealand Centre for Public Law in 1996.

    Sir Paul Walker is the second visiting Borrin Fellow in the Law School at Victoria University.

    Click here to view a video of the lecture.

    Public Lecture - Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers

    Date: 14 March 2013

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 2, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    “The Supreme Court”

    New Zealand Law Foundation Distinguished Visiting Fellow

    Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers

    Please click here to view the flyer for this event

    This lecture explores the origin and development of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. The court was established in 2009 by the Constitutional Reform Act 2005. It is an independent court of appeal that replaced the House of Lords as the highest appellate court in the United Kingdom (other than for Scottish Criminal cases). The move was a milestone in the constitutional history of the United Kingdom, separating the powers exercised by the judiciary and the upper house of Parliament. Symbolically, the court sits alongside, but separate to, the executive and legislative arms of the state.

    Lord Phillips, as the first President of the Supreme Court, explains the history behind the development of the court. He touches on foundational concepts such as the separation of powers, and provides insight on the organisation and structure of the court as it exists today. He considers some of the key cases that have come before the court and the dialogue between the Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.


    NICHOLAS PHILLIPS (Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers) was the first President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. He was educated at King’s College, Cambridge after completing national service with the Royal Navy. He was called to the Bar at the Middle Temple in 1962. He was made a Queen’s Counsel in 1978, became a Recorder in 1982, and was appointed a High Court Judge (Queen’s Bench Division) in 1987. He sat in the Commercial Court and presided over the Barlow Clowes and Maxwell prosecutions. He became a Lord Justice of Appeal in 1995 and a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary in 1999.

    Lord Phillips became Master of the Rolls in 2000 and Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales in 2005. He was the first Lord Chief Justice to be Head of the Judiciary when this role was transferred from the Lord Chancellor in 2006. Lord Phillips became the Senior Lord of Appeal in Ordinary (the senior law lord) in 2008 and the first President of the Supreme Court when it was established in 2009. He was President of the Supreme Court from 2009 to 2012 and is a Knight Companion of the Order of the Garter.

    Lord Phillips is currently a Dixon Poon Distinguished Fellow and Visiting Professor at King’s College, London, the President of the Qatar International Court and a judge on the Court of Final Appeal of Hong Kong.

    Please click here to view a video of the lecture.

     

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    Seminars

    How I Learned International Law Thinking about The Bomb

    Date: 13 May 2014

    Time: 12.40 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 3 (GBLT3), Ground Floor, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    The International Law Association and the Faculty of Law at Victoria University of Wellington invite you to attend a Public Seminar

    "How I Learned International Law Thinking about The Bomb"

    Presented by
    Professor Roger Clark

    Roger Clark is Board of Governors Professor at Rutgers Law School. He is a world authority on international criminal law. He appeared as counsel for Samoa in the International Court of Justice in the Nuclear Weapons case and represented Samoa in the negotiation of the Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court. He has since played a pivotal role in the successful adoption of the amendment to the Statute providing for the crime of aggression. A graduate of Victoria, Professor Clark taught on the Faculty before continuing his distinguished career in the United States. He returns this week to receive an LL D (honoris causa) from his alma mater.
    Chair: Professor Campbell McLachlan QC.

    Tax Avoidance and General Anti-Avoidance Rules: a Commonwealth Perspective

    Date: 5 March 2014

    Time: 6.00 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 2, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay


    Professor ATH Smith, Pro-Vice Chancellor and Dean of Law, invites alumni and friends of Victoria University of Wellington to:

    "Tax Avoidance and General Anti-Avoidance Rules: a Commonwealth Perspective"

    A Public Seminar, 5 March 2014

    Vern Krishna, Professor of Law and Executive Director, CGA Tax and Business Research Centres, University of Ottawa, of Counsel Borden, Ladner, Gervais LLP.
    "The GAAR: Bureaucrat’s Dream or Taxpayer’s Nightmare?"
    Miranda Stewart, Professor of Law, University of Melbourne, International Research Fellow, Centre for Business Taxation, Oxford University.
    "The Hazards of Amending a GAAR: Detailed rules, statutory construction, reasonableness and abuse in the Australian GAAR"
    John Prebble, Professor and former Dean of Law, Victoria University of Wellington, Gastprofessor, Institut für Österreichisches und Internationales Steuerrecht, Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien; Adjunct Senior Research Fellow, Monash University, Melbourne.
    "The Holistic and Objective Predication Test for Tax Avoidance in the Newton and Ben Nevis cases".

    Three of the Commonwealth’s leading scholars of taxation law discuss the modern state’s legislative bulwark against abusive tax planning and international and domestic tax avoidance.

    • 5.30 pm Reception, Student Common Room, VUW Law Faculty, Old Government Building, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington (enter via the south-east door to the Old Government Building, corner Stout and Whitmore Streets).
    • 6.00 pm – 7.30 pm Seminar, Courtyard Lecture Theatre Two, eastern courtyard (harbour side) Old Government Building, 55 Lambton Quay.

    Attendance is free, but there is no overflow venue, so please register by responding to law-events@vuw.ac.nz by Wednesday 26 February.

    Oil Spills in the Niger Delta: Corporate Responsibility for Environment and Human Rights

    Date: 13 February 2014

    Time: 5.30 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 1, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    Amnesty International in association with The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington School of Law invite you to a discussion on:

    “Oil Spills in the Niger Delta: Corporate Responsibility for Environment and Human Rights."

    There have been thousands of oil spills in the Niger Delta -- hundreds every year. They have caused significant environmental damage and consequent impact on the people that live there. Oil spills have destroyed local fishing, farming and other livelihoods, have caused serious human health problems, and have even resulted in deaths, particularly of local activists opposed to the oil activities. The Niger Delta example illustrates the direct link between environmental degradation and human rights abuses.

    The relevant oil companies have claimed that most oil spills are caused by local sabotage and theft. There have thus been many investigations into these oil spills, particularly by the oil companies concerned. Amnesty International conducted an independent investigation into these investigations and recently reported on their findings: Bad information: Oil spill investigations in the Niger Delta (Nov 2013).

    This seminar will discuss the situation in the Niger Delta and some of the existing and alternative mechanisms for addressing the various abuses involved.

    Speakers:

    • Grant Bayldon (Executive Director of Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand), speaking on the situation in the Niger Delta, as discussed in the Amnesty International report, and on Amnesty's Environmental Defenders Network (EDeN).
    • Petra Butler (Ass. Prof, VUW Law School), speaking on the UN Global Compact on corporate social responsibility and the use of private law to enforce human rights standards.
    • Ngozi Stewart (PhD, Lecturer in Law at the University of Benin, Nigeria), speaking on Greening the Nigerian Constitution and its effect on the Environmental Degradation in Nigeria's Niger Delta Region.

    Chaired by Diana Shand (IUCN: Vice-President, 2008-2012, & Regional Councillor-Oceania, 2004-2012.)

    Constitutional Conversations on the Separation of Church and State in NZ

    Date: 13 July 2013

    Time: 1.00 pm

    Venue: Lecture Theatre 1, Old Government Buildings, 55 Lambton Quay, Wellington


    NZCPL Seminar:

    Should a NZ constitution include a formal separation of church and state?  Other Western democracies do.  Join our constitutional conversation to discuss the experience from other countries and their relevance to Aotearoa NZ.

    Speakers:

    • Dr Caroline Sawyer, Senior Lecturer, School of Law, Victoria University, will address the UK experience
    • Gay Morgan, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Waikato, will address the USA experience
    • Dr Meg Wallace, former lecturer in law, University of Canberra, will address the AUST experience
    • Dr Bryce Edwards, Department of Politics, Otago University, will address implications for NZ

    Panel discussion:
    Panel speakers include Dave Armstrong, Dominion Post columnist and playwright, and Ngaire McCarthy, past-president of the NZ Association of Rationalists and Humanists.

    Refreshments will be provided, please RSVP to nzcpl@vuw.ac.nz to confirm your attendance.

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