Kate Schick

Senior Lecturer School of History, Philosophy, Political Science & International Relations

Courses

Teaching in 2017

Dr Kate Schick profile picture

Qualifications

  • BA Hons Otago
  • MLitt, PhD St Andrews

Profile

Kate joined the Programme in February 2009. Prior to this, she was an Economic and Social Research Council Fellow at the University of St Andrews, where she also completed an MLitt in International Security Studies (Commonwealth Scholar) and a PhD in International Relations (NZ Top Achiever Doctoral Scholar). Her research intersects critical theory and international ethics, with three main foci: critical exegesis of the work of Gillian Rose, an important but neglected British philosopher; vulnerability and international relations; and recognition theory and international political thought.

Kate teaches courses on conflict and critical theory. At the postgraduate level, she teaches the honours course War and its Aftermath, which examines the changing nature of war, different approaches to mitigating conflict, and the myriad challenges posed by the aftermath of war. At the undergraduate level, she teaches Critical Global Politics, which draws on the work of key critical theorists to examine oppression, vulnerability, emancipation and resistance.

Research interests

Kate’s research interests lie at the intersection between critical theory and international ethics.

She is author of Gillian Rose: A Good Enough Justice (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012). This book emphasises the contribution Rose's 'speculative' Hegelianism makes to debates in radical political theory, arguing that it offers important and provocative lessons for the contemporary Left. Recent publications in Telos (‘Re-cognizing recognition’) and an edited book on political theology (‘Beside difficulty in Gillian Rose’s political theory’, forthcoming) continue to bring Rose’s work to a wider audience.

Kate’s work in critical international ethics brings concepts like vulnerability and recognition to the forefront of international political theory. She is co-editor of The Vulnerable Subject: Beyond Rationalism in International Relations (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and Recognition and Global Politics: Critical Encounters between State and World (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016). The Vulnerable Subject maintains that we cannot meaningfully engage with vulnerability within Enlightenment forms of knowledge and proffers an agonistic framework for understanding vulnerability that takes into account embodied experience, emotion, and community and allows room for contingency and risk. Recognition and Global Politics examines the potential and limitations of the discourse of recognition as a strategy for reframing justice and injustice within contemporary world affairs. It explores new dimensions of the recognition-international nexus that move the conversation into innovative, critical analyses of rights, humanity, power and emancipation.

Kate is interested in supervising research students working on international political thought and critical security studies broadly conceived, including topics on vulnerability, mourning, trauma, and suffering. She particularly enjoys interdisciplinary co-supervision, and has co-supervised students in conjunction with scholars from Philosophy, Art History, Wai-te-Ata Press, Education, and Sociology as well as from within Political Science and International Relations. Recently completed supervisions include: 'Emancipating space from the conditions of violence: ‘The Broken Middle and Inaugurated Mourning in Israel and Palestine'; ‘Communicating a Culture of Peace in Aotearoa New Zealand: The Vision of Peace Through Unity’; and ‘Mourning and its Obstruction: A Rosean take on Critical Security Studies’.

Current research interests

Kate is currently working on a project on critical pedagogy and recognition theory. Her chapter on ‘Unsettling pedagogy’ (in Recognition and Global Politics)argues that pedagogy infused with an agonistic conception of recognition offers a radical challenge to mainstream and cosmopolitan education and, more broadly, to dominant liberal capitalist norms.  This unsettling pedagogy cannot co-exist with societal desires for certainty, self-preservation, and invulnerability; indeed, one its foremost ‘tasks’ is to challenge the deeply rooted ignorance and indifference that pervade modern society and that spring from a fear of recognition. In so doing, this approach promotes a counter-cultural embrace of ambiguity, vulnerability, and love. Kate’s project on critical pedagogy resonates with broader interdisciplinary initiative on teaching critical theory at Victoria University of Wellington – the ‘critical theory project’.

Publications

  • ‘“The tree is really rooted in the sky”: Beside difficulty in Gillian Rose’s political theory’, in Joshua B. Davis, Misrecognitions: Gillian Rose and the Task of Political Theology (Eugene, Oregon: Wipf and Stock, forthcoming).
  • ‘Critical International Ethics: Knowing/Acting Differently’, in Brent J. Steele and Eric Heinz (eds.) Routledge Handbook of Ethics and International Relations (Routledge, 2018).
  • Recognition and Global Politics: Critical Encounters between State and World, edited with Patrick Hayden (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016).
  • 'Unsettling Pedagogy: Recognition, Vulnerability, and the International' in Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick (eds.), Recognition and Global Politics: Critical Encounters between State and World (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016).
  • Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick, 'Recognition and the International: Meanings, Limits, Manifestations' in Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick (eds.), Recognition and Global Politics: Critical Encounters between State and World (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016).
  • 'Re-cognizing recognition: Gillian Rose’s ‘radical Hegel’ and vulnerable recognition', Telos (Winter, 2015), pp. 87-105.
  • 'Gillian Rose and Vulnerable Judgement' in Amanda Russell Beattie and Kate Schick (eds), The Vulnerable Subject: Beyond Rationalism in International Relations (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), pp. 43-61.
  • Amanda Russell Beattie and Kate Schick, 'Introduction', in Amanda Russell Beattie and Kate Schick (eds), The Vulnerable Subject: Beyond Rationalism in International Relations (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), pp. 1-24.
  • (co-edited with Amanda Russell Beattie) The Vulnerable Subject: Beyond Rationalism in International Relations (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013)
  • Gillian Rose: A Good Enough Justice (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012).
  • 'Against Overcorrection: Risking the Universal', in J.L. Shaw and Michael Hemmingsen (eds), Human Beings and Freedom: An Interdisciplinary Perspective (Punthi Pustak: Kolkata, 2011), pp. 219-224.
  • Acting out and working through: trauma and (in)security', Review of International Studies, Vol. 37, No. 4 (2011), pp. 1837-1855.
  • ‘“To lend a voice to suffering is a condition for all truth”: Adorno and International Political Thought’, Journal of International Political Theory , Vol. 5, No. 2 (2009), pp. 138-160.
  • ‘Beyond rules: A critique of the liberal human rights regime’, International Relations, Vol. 20, No. 3 (2006), pp. 345-351.

Awards

  • 2014 Early Career Research Excellence Award (Victoria University of Wellington).
  • 2011 Most Popular Lecturer in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (Victoria Awards).
  • 2008 Economic and Social Research Council Fellowship, UK (ESRC, held at University of St Andrews).
  • 2005 NZ Top Achiever PhD Scholarship (NZ Tertiary Education Commission, held at University of St Andrews).
  • 2003 Commonwealth Scholarship (Association of Commonwealth Universities, held at University of St Andrews).