Jack Vowles

Professor School of History, Philosophy, Political Science & International Relations

Courses

Teaching in 2017

Prof Jack Vowles profile picture

Qualifications

BA, MA (Auckland)

PhD (University of British Columbia), FRSNZ

Profile

I came to Victoria in late 2014 on a pathway through first and second degrees at Auckland, a PhD in Canada, a postdoctoral Fellowship at Otago, a year at Massey, two periods at Auckland, one as a Lecturer, one as Professor, with an intervening period at Waikato. After five years working at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, I was very pleased to return to New Zealand.  Throughout all this I served as Head of three different Departments, have been the grateful recipient of a James Cook Fellowship, and am a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand. I served on the Planning Committee of the Comparative Study of Electoral Systems (CSES) for ten years and led the New Zealand Election Study.
More information can be found on my personal website, including a somewhat irregular blog page.

Research areas

Comparative political behaviour, with a focus on elections, legislatures, referendums, election campaigns, public opinion, and the consequences of electoral systems.
More details about my current research can be found from the links below:

Selected publications

Books

  • Vowles, J., ed. The New Electoral Politics in New Zealand: the Significance of the 2011 Election, Wellington, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, 2014.
  • Vowles, J., Aimer, P., Karp, J, Banducci, S., Miller, R, ed., Voters’ Veto: The 2002 Election in New Zealand and the Consolidation of Minority Government. Auckland University Press, 2004.

Articles

  • Vowles, J., 2013, 'Campaign Claims, Partisan Cues, and Media Effects in the 2011 British Electoral System Referendum', Electoral Studies, 32, 253-264.
  • Vowles, Jack, 2011,‘Why Voters Prefer Coalitions: Rationality or Norms’, Political Science 63, 126-145
  • Vowles, J., 2010. ‘Key to Victory: the New Zealand Election of 2008’, New Zealand Sociology 25, 1, 166.174
  • Vowles, J., 2010. ‘Electoral System Change, Generations, Competitiveness and Turnout in New Zealand, 1963-2005’, British Journal of Political Science, 40, 4, 875-895
  • Vowles, Jack, 2010, ‘Making a Difference? Public Perceptions of Coalition, Single-Party, and Minority Governments’, Electoral Studies 29, 3, 370-380
  • Vowles, Jack, 2008. ‘Does Globalization Affect Public Perceptions of ‘Who in power Can Make a Difference’? Evidence from 40 Countries, 1996-2006’ Electoral Studies 27, 63-76
  • Vowles, Jack, ‘Comparing District Magnitude Effects Under Ordinal and Nominal Ballot Structures in Non-Partisan Elections: The 2004 Local Elections in New Zealand’, Representation 43, 4, 2007, 289-306
  • McLeay, Elizabeth and Jack Vowles, 2006 ‘Redefining Constituency: the Roles of New Zealand MPs’, Regional and Federal Studies, 17, 1, 71-95.

Book chapters

  • Vowles, J., 'The 2011 Election Through a Wide-Angle Lens', in Vowles, J., ed. The New Electoral Politics in New Zealand: the Significance of the 2011 Election. Wellington, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, 2014.
  • Vowles, J., 'Down, Down, Down: Turnout from 1946 to 2011', in Vowles, J., ed. The New Electoral Politics in New Zealand: the Significance of the 2011 Election. Wellington, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, 2014.
  • Vowles, J., 'Putting the 2011 Election in its Place', in Vowles, J., ed. The New Electoral Politics in New Zealand: the Significance of the 2011 Election. Wellington, Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, 2014.
  • Vowles, Jack, 2009. ‘The 2008 Election: Why National Won’, in Raymond Miller, ed., New Zealand Government and Politics, 5th edition, Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 365-382
  • Vowles, Jack, 2008. ‘The Genie in the Bottle: Is New Zealand’s MMP System Here to Stay’, in Mark Frances and Jim Tully, ed., In the Public Interest: Essays in Honour of Professor Keith Jackson, Christchurch, University of Canterbury Press, 105-125
  • Vowles, Jack, 2008. ‘Systemic Failure, Coordination, and Contingencies: Understanding Electoral System Change in New Zealand’, in Andre Blais, ed., To Keep or Change First Past the Post: The Politics of Electoral Reform, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Some of my most recent papers can be downloaded from my personal website.