Faculty of Graduate Research

Past Events

Information Events

International PhD Orientation

Date: 28 August 2014

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Room TBC, Kleburn Campus

Our orientation programme is designed to get your PhD study at VUW off to the best possible start.

Day 2. This half-day session is compulsory for all new international PhD students, focussing on being a new PhD student in a new country and a new culture, as well as introducing VUW, Wellington and New Zealand to you more generally.

Register

PhD Orientation

Date: 26 August 2014

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Our orientation programme is designed to get your PhD study at VUW off to the best possible start.
Day 1. This session is compulsory for all new PhD students. In the course of this day we deliver crucial information about PhD candidature at VUW and help you to understand the process of undertaking a PhD.

Register

International PhD Orientation

Date: 4 March 2014

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Our orientation programme is designed to get your PhD study at VUW off to the best possible start.

Day 2 (half day) is compulsory for all new international PhD students. This morning session will focus on being a new PhD student in a new country and a new culture, as well as introducing VUW, Wellington and New Zealand to you more generally.

Register here

Summer Research Scholars - Orientation

Date: 12 November 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Memorial Theatre, Level 2, Student Union Building, Kelburn Campus

This orientation is compulsory for all summer research scholarship recipients taking part in the 2013/14 programme.

The orientation will ensure you have all the important information regarding the scholarship programme and will include short sessions on your intellectual property obligations and basic research skills.

We will also be inviting supervisors to join scholars for refreshments mid-morning.

PhD Orientation

Date: 7–8 May 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Our orientation programme is designed to get your PhD study at VUW off to the best possible start.

Day 1 (full day) is compulsory for all new PhD students. In the course of this day we deliver crucial information about PhD candidature at VUW and help you to understand the process of undertaking a PhD.

Day2 (half day) is compulsory for all new international PhD students. This morning session will focus on being a new PhD student in a new country and a new culture, as well as introducing VUW, Wellington and New Zealand to you more generally.

Due to this Orientation being full, registration has now closed. More information on the next PhD Orientation.

PhD Orientation

Date: 5–6 March 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Our orientation programme is designed to get your PhD study at VUW off to the best possible start.

Day 1 (full day) is compulsory for all new PhD students. In the course of this day we deliver crucial information about PhD candidature at VUW and help you to understand the process of undertaking a PhD.

Day2 (half day) is compulsory for all new international PhD students. This morning session will focus on being a new PhD student in a new country and a new culture, as well as introducing VUW, Wellington and New Zealand to you more generally.

Registration for this orientation has closed because the course is full.


 

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Staff Events

PGR Topic Groups - Provisional to Full Registration

Date: 8 July 2014

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Bring your questions, ideas and information to share about what works well in your School.
  
This is the first of our PGR topic group series.

Register

Orientation to Research

Date: 2 July 2014

Time: 9.45 am

Venue: AM101, Alan macDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This workshop is run by the Research Office and will give staff new to Victoria an overview of Research at Victoria. There will be a focus on:

  • Expectations of research performance
  • Support for research
  • Resources provided for research
  • Getting a research programme started at Victoria

Register

How to calculate international Grade Point Averages (GPAs)

Date: 24 June 2014

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Find out how to calculate international Grade Point Averages (GPAs) for PhD applications. During this session we will work through some examples and answer any questions.

Register

Orientation to PGR Candidature Management

Date: 29 May 2014

Time: 1.30 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

If you are new to your role as a postgraduate coordinator or administrator, or would simply like a refresher on the various processes, then come along to our Orientation sessions:

Part 1
Thursday 29 May : 1.30 – 3.00pm : Room AM103

•Doctoral Admissions and Scholarships process
•Year 1 of PhD candidature
•Progress reporting (PhD and Masters)

Part 2
Thursday 5 June : 1.30 – 3.00pm : Room AM103

•Suspensions and extensions
•Annual registration process
•Doctoral examinations

Register here

The High Performance Researcher

Date: 5 December 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: Room 204, 10 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus

As a busy academic do you feel like you never have enough time to get to your research, particularly the writing part? And that other things like students, administration, committees, emails, project management etc demand all your time?

This workshop shows you how to guarantee you spend high quality time on your research outputs. It covers prioritising, goal setting and managing competing demands in a university context. If you want to increase your research output without compromising your work/life balance, then this workshop is for you. Key aspects of this workshop have featured in the journal Nature.

This workshop will show you how to:
• take control of your time
• prioritise
• say NO (and understand why it is so hard to do so)
• balance competing demands
• work the slightly less hard way
• think more realistically about your research productivity
• manage your time in a busy research environment
• publishing strategically
• using the team (or others) to increase publication productivity
• work collaboratively
• keep track of publications to increase motivation and accountability
• manage your publication “resources” for maximum output
• attributes of a successful (and highly productive) research leader/team.

Presenter: Maria Gardiner from THINKWELL. This workshop is for academic staff only.

Register

 

Discussing Supervision @ Vic - Self-Sabotaging Students: What can supervisors do to help?

Date: 4 December 2013

Time: 12.00 pm

Venue: KK203, Kirk Building, Kelburn Campus

Academia is, almost by definition, a highly evaluative environment jam-packed with high-achieving people. Many postgraduate students struggle with the fear that they will not be able to maintain their usual levels of achievement in this environment, and adopt self-sabotaging/self-handicapping behaviours. Such behaviours include procrastination, avoidance tactics, and reluctance to write or to share written work with others.

Maria Gardiner and Hugh Kearns have performed extensive research into this behaviour among PhD students. Maria will be our special guest facilitator on our next Discussing Supervision @ Vic session where we will consider how supervisors can help students who are self-sabotaging.

Participants might be interested to read some of Maria and Hugh’s publications on the self-sabotaging (for which, see below), but the focus of the session will be on sharing experiences and finding solutions. Please feel free to bring your lunch with you; tea, coffee and biscuits will be provided.

Relevant publications:

Gardiner, M., & Kearns, H. (2011). Turbocharge your writing today. Nature, 475, 129.

Kearns, H., Forbes, A., Gardiner, M., & Marshall, K. (2008). When a high distinction isn’t good enough: A review of perfectionism and self-handicapping. The Australian Educational Researcher 35(3), 21-36.

Kearns, H., Gardiner, M., & Marshall, K. (2008). Innovation in PhD completion: The hardy shall succeed (and be happy!). Higher Education Research and Development, 27(1), 77-89.

Register here

Briefing for Chairs of PhD Oral Exams

Date: 12 November 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: Room 101, 24 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus

The FGR is establishing a pool of senior academic staff members holding the role of Associate Professor/Reader or Professor (not in an adjunct role) who are prepared to chair PhD oral examinations.

The briefing will include:

  • an update on recent changes to the PhD examination process
  • material to support the role of the chair
  • a panel discussion with experienced chairs.

Orientation to Postgraduate Supervision

Date: 5 November 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

The orientation is designed for those new to supervision and for experienced supervisors who are new to Victoria.

The orientation will cover:

  • PhD and Master's policy
  • postgraduate research supervision
  • the doctoral examination process
  • practical support available for postgraduate research.

Completing the orientation is a minimum requirement for all Victoria postgraduate research supervisors.

Postgraduate Coordinators Information Session

Date: 22 October 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

A short information session to support PG Coordinators & Administrators.

Discussing Supervision @ Vic

Date: 21 October 2013

Time: 4.45 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Here at Victoria, the Faculty of Graduate Research would like to establish a community of practice around supervision. This community would comprise staff who are interested in discussing postgraduate supervision in order to equip themselves with lessons learned from others and the best supervisory resources available.

Insights into successful supervisory practice

Date: 21 October 2013

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Based on recent research in this area, this workshop will provide you with strategies and tools for clarifying expectations and getting the supervisory relationship off to a great start. The workshop will be an ideal guide for relatively new supervisors and a refresher for more experienced supervisors, as well as an opportunity to meet with colleagues from other parts of the University.

The hidden lives of research students: implications for supervisors

Date: 7 October 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This workshop is for supervisors of doctoral and other higher degree research students, and should be relevant both to those new to the supervision role and those with more experience. It draws on international research focused on graduate research students’ learning and experiences in order to shed light on practices, study habits, and challenges encountered by students. The emphasis is on issues that often remain under the radar as well as those that typically arise in the context of research supervision. The aim is to consider the implications for supervisors, without assuming that supervisors are omnipotent solvers of all issues faced by doctoral students! Indeed a key outcome relates to considering pedagogies that can support students in becoming more ‘relationally agentic’. Supervisors attending this workshop are guaranteed* smoother and quicker completion of degrees by their students. (*Not guaranteed).

Orientation to Postgraduate Supervision

Date: 25 June 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: MY632, Murphy Building, Kelburn Campus

The orientation is designed for those new to supervision and for experienced supervisors who are new to Victoria.

The orientation will cover:

  • PhD and Master's policy
  • postgraduate research supervision
  • the doctoral examination process
  • practical support available for postgraduate research.

Completing the orientation is a minimum requirement for all Victoria postgraduate research supervisors.

 

Briefing for Chairs of PhD Oral Exams

Date: 18 June 2013

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Room 103, 24 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus

The FGR is establishing a pool of senior academic staff members holding the role of Associate Professor/Reader or Professor (not in an adjunct role) who are prepared to chair PhD oral examinations.

The two-hour briefing will include:

  • an update on recent changes to the PhD examination process
  • material to support the role of the chair
  • a panel discussion with experienced chairs.

 

Postgraduate Coordinators Information Session

Date: 11 June 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

A short information session to support PG Coordinators & Administrators.

Fundamentals of PhD Supervision

Date: 8 May 2013

Time: 1.30 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This is aimed at new or inexperienced supervisors or staff who are about to become supervisors for the first time. It will cover: Why supervise; Finding the right student; Before they start; Getting off to a good start; Clarifying expectations; Meetings; Understanding the relevant policies and procedures; The personal side of the relationship; What to do if things go wrong.

Postgraduate Coordinators Information Session

Date: 27 March 2013

Time: 9.30 am

A short information session to support PG Coordinators & Administrators.

 

Creating the 7 secrets of highly successful research students (for supervisors)

Date: 6 March 2013

Time: 1.30 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

You know what your postgraduate research student should be doing, but it just doesn’t seem to happening. Despite your best efforts to set up good habits for your student, it does not work. Why is this and what can you do to make completing a postgraduate research degree easier for your students and for you?

Students attending the seven secrets workshop have consistently reported a marked improvement towards completing their postgraduate research degrees. Now they have asked us to please tell their supervisors the same things!

This course gives you practical strategies to deal with common problems such as: supervisor /student relations; dealing with writer’s block; attitude (or lack thereof) in relation to the thesis – its not a Nobel prize; getting your student to seek help when they are stuck; the student who never has enough time.

 

Briefing for Chairs of PhD Oral Exams

Date: 26 February 2013

Time: 10.00 am

The FGR is establishing a pool of senior academic staff members holding the role of Associate Professor/Reader or Professor (not in an adjunct role) who are prepared to chair PhD oral examinations.

The two-hour briefing will include:

  • an update on recent changes to the PhD examination process
  • material to support the role of the chair
  • a panel discussion with experienced chairs.

 

Orientation to Postgraduate Supervision

Date: 21 February 2013

Time: 9.30 am

The orientation is designed for those new to supervision and for experienced supervisors who are new to Victoria.

The orientation will cover:

  • PhD and Master's policy
  • postgraduate research supervision
  • the doctoral examination process
  • practical support available for postgraduate research.

Completing the orientation is a minimum requirement for all Victoria postgraduate research supervisors.

 

Briefing for Chairs of PhD Oral Exams

Date: 20 November 2012

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Room 201, 10 Waiteata Road, Kelburn Campus

The FGR is establishing a pool of senior academic staff members holding the role of Associate Professor/Reader or Professor (not in an adjunct role) who are prepared to chair PhD oral examinations.

The two-hour briefing will include:

  • an update on recent changes to the PhD examination process
  • material to support the role of the chair
  • a panel discussion with experienced chairs. 

 

Orientation to Postgraduate Supervision

Date: 1 November 2012

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: Room 632, Murphy Building (MY632), Kelburn Campus

The orientation is designed for those new to supervision and for experienced supervisors who are new to Victoria.

The orientation will cover:

  • PhD and Master's policy
  • postgraduate research supervision
  • the doctoral examination process
  • practical support available for postgraduate research.

Completing the orientation is a minimum requirement for all Victoria postgraduate research supervisors.

 

 

Postgraduate Coordinators Information Session

Date: 30 October 2012

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: MY632, Murphy Building (Level 6), Kelburn Campus

A short information session to support PG Coordinators & Administrators.

 

Insights into successful supervisory practice

Date: 16 October 2012

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: Room 305, 77 Fairlie Terrace, Kelburn Campus

Based on recent research in this area, this workshop will provide you with strategies and tools for clarifying expectations and getting the supervisory relationship off to a great start. The workshop will be an ideal guide for relatively new supervisors and a refresher for more experienced supervisors, as well as an opportunity to meet with colleagues from other parts of the University.

Thesis Examination (for supervisors)

Date: 15 October 2012

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

What do supervisors need to consider when preparing candidates for examination, when selecting examiners and when being an examiner? This workshop will provide an opportunity to explore these aspects of the examination process.

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Workshops

How you might effectively manage your candidature

Date: 21 October 2014

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: KK202, Kirk Building, Kelburn Campus

Presenter: Margaret Kiley

This workshop is aimed at candidates in the early stages of their research degree and will address strategies for how candidates can effectively manage their candidature.

Register

What are examiners thinking when they examine your PhD?

Date: 20 October 2014

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: KK202, Kirk Building, Kelburn Campus

Presenter: Margaret Kiley

This session is for candidates at all stages, and will address issues related to the examination of the written thesis. The workshop will address the identification of potential examiners and then look at how examiners report that they examine the written text and what they look for.

Register

CVs and Cover Letters for Public and Private Sector Careers

Date: 15 October 2014

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Jobhunting is a time-consuming and often stressful enterprise, but there are ways to make the experience efficient and interesting and that, in part, is down to the attitude, skills and resources you bring to it. As a successful jobhunter, your task is to achieve a satisfactory ratio of applications to interviews, and to feel that throughout your jobhunt, you are growing in confidence and knowledge, rather than feeling diminished and disheartened by it. Maximising positive responses and interview offers from potential employers requires thorough research, and the willingness to engage with them, understand their organisation, and the role you hope to secure. This allows your to position yourself as the solution to their problems and a great person to deal with.

As a postgraduate student, you have already demonstrated that research and writing are your strengths. Preparing effective CVs and cover letters is simply another research and writing challenge in which the measure of success is an interview. Application and selection processes may also require other writing skills such as responding to formal email correspondence, social-media writing, preparing written business advice or an analysis of a piece of policy. While some of these may not be part of your experience so far, as accomplished writers they can become so. You are already on your way to becoming research and writing experts and this session is intended to help you apply your skills effectively to the task of getting that job.

NB: Some of the material covered in this workshop will be similar to that covered in the “Applying for a Job” workshop at Reorientation, but as the session title suggests, the focus this time will be on applying for non-academic jobs during and at the end of a PhD. Bring along any questions you have.

Register

Preparing for the Oral Defence

Date: 17 September 2014

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: RHLT3, Rutherford House Lecture Theatre, Pipitea Campus

At Victoria, each PhD student must defend his or her thesis orally as part of the examination process. This workshop is aimed at students nearing the end of their candidature who are interested in learning all about the PhD oral defence.

The workshop will consider how best to prepare for the defence; what you can expect from your examiners; and how you can effectively answer some of those difficult questions.

This interactive workshop is designed to give you an overview of policy and expectations as well as provide opportunities for you to ask lots of questions. Our aim is to make you as confident and well prepared as possible for the oral defence.

Register now

Early Career Researcher Workshop: Copyright and Permissions

Date: 10 September 2014

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Knowing how to negotiate the rules around copyright, what principles apply (and which take precedence in which situation) can be very difficult. In this workshop, a panel representing legal, publishing and academic perspectives will address a series of scenarios that are designed to demonstrate these principles and how they relate to one another. Participants will have the opportunity ask questions of the panel and to work through a scenario themselves.

Register now

Equipping PhD Students Today for Employment in the Future—Reorientation 2014

Date: 4 September 2014

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: COLT122, Cotton Building, Kelburn Campus

You know that it’s a tough employment market out there. What might you do now to make your transition into your chosen career a bit smoother?

The programme for Reorientation comprises a series of sessions, some of which will run concurrently. The sessions on offer will be:
• Using Reflection and Evaluation for Improving Teaching;
• Applying for a Job;
• Transferable Skills and the ePortfolio;
• Networking;
• Employability and the PhD (panel).

Register

The Imposter Syndrome

Date: 27 August 2014

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: HMLT001, Hugh MacKenzie Lecture Theatre, Kelburn Campus

How can it be that so many clever, competent and capable people can feel that they are just one step away from being exposed as a complete fraud? Despite evidence that they are performing well they can still have that lurking fear that at any moment someone is going to tap them on the shoulder and say “We need to have a chat”.

Come along and hear from our internationally renowned speaker what the latest psychological research has to tell us about ‘The Imposter Syndrome’ and, more importantly, some strategies for dealing with it.

At the end of this session you will:
• Know what the latest psychological research tells us about the imposter syndrome is and how it operates
• Realise how widespread imposter feelings are and why highly successful people can feel like frauds
• Be aware of evidence-based strategies that reduce imposter feelings

Register

Research Abstracts

Date: 20 August 2014

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

There are many circumstances in which you will need to produce a short description of your research. You’ll need one, for example, for your thesis, for any journal articles you publish, for funding applications, and for calls for papers. Despite their ubiquity and the important job they have to do, abstracts are often overlooked and undervalued. They become something to be banged out once the real work is done, or a short offering designed to placate the gods of research funding/conference participation.

In this workshop, we’ll look at how to get the most out of those few words, whatever the circumstances. You’ll need to bring along something that needs an abstract and something to write with/in/on. You might bring:
 -a proposal of some kind (call for papers, grant application)*
 -something you’ve written (such as a journal article; your thesis might be a bit much)
 -someone else’s paper (just to practice on)
*If you’re writing an abstract for a proposal, the guidelines for the proposal might also be useful.

Registration

Writing Productively

Date: 6 August 2014

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

The experience of writing both forms and reinforces writing behaviours. This experience can lead to “writing rules” which can be enabling or disabling. In the first hour of this workshop, we’ll discuss how to identify these behaviours and “rules” and how to use them to your advantage. In the second hour, we’ll try out a popular writing strategy: the Pomodoro technique. Bring along something specific that you’d like to write and something to write it on/in.

Register

Combatting the Thesis Doldrums

Date: 16 July 2014

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

At some point in the course of your PhD candidature, you are likely to go through an emotional and motivational slump. This slump is so common that higher education community has given it a name: the “thesis doldrums.” In this workshop, we’ll discuss why this phenomenon is so common, and provide strategies and guidance to help you if you do find yourself in this situation.

Register

Early Career Research - Getting to Grips with Funding Applications

Date: 9 July 2014

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: MY632, Murphy Building, Kelburn Campus

Looking to apply for funding? Wonder what stands out about a great funding application (and what sorts of mistakes to avoid)? This workshop is for you!

Register

Managing the Pressures of being a Postgraduate Research Student

Date: 25 June 2014

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: SU309/310, Student Union Building, Kelburn Campus

Presenter: Elizabeth Mellor

This workshop is about finding ways to manage the challenges of being a postgraduate research student at university. Being a research student presents a unique set of challenges that are not often addressed. This workshop will cover such important topics of

• how to maintain motivation and commitment over a long time period
• how to balance the pressures of work, study, research and home
• developing positive relationships with supervisors
• managing time and dealing with procrastination
• getting completion

There will also be time to discuss in a supportive and confidential setting other issues that students may bring regarding being a research student.

Register here

Thesis Writing

Date: 18 June 2014

Time: 10.30 am

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This session will provide an overview of the thesis-writing process, the relationship between its parts, and the different types of writing involved. It will also introduce a number of techniques and prompts to help keep your argument on track. Participants are encouraged to bring a 1-2 page sample of their writing to workshop.

Registration has now closed due to the workshop being full.

Turbocharge Your Writing

Date: 27 February 2014

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: GBLT3, Government Buildings, Pipitea Campus

Would you like to know the secret to high output, high quality, scholarly writing? In academia, because writing is such a big part of what you do, it is often assumed that it comes naturally. However, for most academics, it can be a hit and miss activity, with some days (weeks or even months!) being hard to get started. And when you do get started you might sit there for hours and not produce many words. Finally, when the words are on the page, you may wonder why you bothered since what you have written isn’t very good.

This workshop draws on the overwhelming body of research (and experience with thousands of writers). This research shows that there are very clear and practical evidence-based strategies that can greatly increase your writing quality and quantity. Key aspects of this workshop have featured in the journal Nature.

This workshop will help you to understand:

• why it can be hard to get started
• how we deliberately use distractions to slow down writing
• the principles of quick starting
• why snack writing is generally more productive than binge writing
• how to deal with the internal committee that slows down writing
• how to set achievable goals by writing in a silo
• how to greatly double (or more) the number of actual words you produce
• how to clarify your thinking and improve the quality of your work

Register here

Defeating Self Sabotage

Date: 4 December 2013

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: KKLT301, Kirk Building, Kelburn Campus

Do you find that despite your best efforts to ‘work on your thesis’ or get your research output going it just doesn’t seem to be happening? Does there always seem to be something more urgent, interesting or important to do? Perhaps you are self-sabotaging. If you think you procrastinate, are a perfectionist, don’t say no often enough, are disorganised or are always ‘busy’, this seminar will help you to understand why your thesis or research isn’t getting done and what you can do about it.

Presenter: Maria Gardiner from THINKWELL

Register

Writing Productively

Date: 26 November 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: HULT220, Hunter Building, Kelburn Campus

The way that you feel when you write has a big impact on the way that you feel about writing and the behaviours that you develop around writing. These behaviours can develop into “writing rules.” As with all rules, writing rules both give and deny permission, and so can be enabling or disabling.

In this workshop, we will spend the first hour discussing the rules and behaviours that we develop about writing and how those rules can be tested and used to enable writing productivity. We’ll also look at few different writing strategies. In the second hour of the workshop we’ll try out one of those strategies: the Pomodoro Technique.

In order to participate in the second half of the workshop you will need to bring with you something that you want to write and the material means with which to do so (laptop, pen and paper etc). Try to select a writing task that is fairly specific: not “my thesis” or “that chapter” or “that article,” but rather a specific part of any of those things.

Please note: I have given versions of this workshop at the Faculty of Education and the School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies thesis group. If you attended either of those sessions you are very welcome to attend again, but you should be aware that the ground that we are covering is largely the same.

Register

What are examiners thinking when they examine your thesis?

Date: 22 October 2013

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: HMLT104, Hugh Mackenzie Building, Kelburn Campus

How are examiners selected? What do examiners think and do during the examination process? How best do you prepare for examination?

This workshop will focus on the theory of the topic rather than the specific examination requirements at Victoria and is based on Dr Kiley’s research in the area of thesis examination. 

Managing Candidature - what's my role?

Date: 22 October 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: HMLT104, Hugh Mackenzie Building, Kelburn Campus

How do you take responsibility for managing this three to four year project (your PhD) that you have embarked on? How do you make sure you get the most out of your relationship with your supervisor?

Employability and the PhD

Date: 21 October 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Candidates enter a doctoral program with many different motivations, and for many this includes some form or career development and employability. However, while the PhD has traditionally provided an education for an academic career, many candidates are now moving into positions outside the academy. Therefore, this workshop will aim to answer the following questions:

  • What are some of the issues related to employability and the PhD?
  • How might candidates best prepare themselves for “life after the PhD”

Thesis Doldrums

Date: 17 October 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: HMLT104, Hugh Mackenzie Building, Kelburn Campus

At some point in the course of your PhD candidature, you are likely to go through an emotional and motivational slump. This slump is so common that higher education community has given it a name: the “thesis doldrums.” In this workshop, we’ll discuss why this phenomenon is so common, and provide strategies and guidance to help you if you do find yourself in this situation.

How to succeed in academic publishing: from fundamentals to the ins and outs of peer review

Date: 8 October 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Want to publish in academic journals? Not sure how it all works? Had a paper or two accepted but want to get better at navigating the peer review process? What do you do if you get conflicting reviews? What if you get a nasty review? How do you get away with not doing what reviewers want you to do?

The workshop provide a general overview of journal quality, impact factors etc, as well as responding to questions submitted by participants as part of registration. It will then look more closely at peer review processes and practices, using real examples of reviews and letters to editors. Outcomes will include a range of strategies for (i) reading and responding to reviews; (ii) justifying your revisions to the editor.

This workshop is relevant to scholars who haven’t yet published as well as those with some publishing experience. Please be advised that the workshop will not cover details on the actual writing of papers. Participants in this workshop are guaranteed* acceptance in top-ranked journals. (*Not guaranteed).

Registration has closed as this workshop is now full.

How to succeed in academic publishing: from fundamentals to the ins and outs of peer review

Date: 7 October 2013

Time: 3.00 pm

Venue: RHLT3, Rutherford House, Pipitea Campus

Want to publish in academic journals? Not sure how it all works? Had a paper or two accepted but want to get better at navigating the peer review process? What do you do if you get conflicting reviews? What if you get a nasty review? How do you get away with not doing what reviewers want you to do?

The workshop provide a general overview of journal quality, impact factors etc, as well as responding to questions submitted by participants as part of registration. It will then look more closely at peer review processes and practices, using real examples of reviews and letters to editors. Outcomes will include a range of strategies for (i) reading and responding to reviews; (ii) justifying your revisions to the editor.

This workshop is relevant to scholars who haven’t yet published as well as those with some publishing experience. Please be advised that the workshop will not cover details on the actual writing of papers. Participants in this workshop are guaranteed* acceptance in top-ranked journals. (*Not guaranteed).

 

Preparing for the oral defence

Date: 19 September 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: RWW501, Railway West Wing, Pipitea Campus

At Victoria, each PhD student must defend his or her thesis orally as part of the examination process. This workshop is aimed at students nearing the end of their candidature who are interested in learning all about the PhD oral defence.

The workshop will consider:

•how best to prepare for the defence
•what you can expect from your examiners
•how you can effectively answer some of those difficult questions

This interactive workshop is designed to give you an overview of policy and expectations as well as provide opportunities for you to ask lots of questions. Our aim is to make you as confident and well prepared as possible for the oral defence.

Reorientation

Date: 4 September 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: COLT122, Cotton Building, Kelburn Campus

This day-long programme will provide you with information that will help you to move past submission and into post-doctoral work, whether it be in academia or in research. Although the middle of your candidature might seem early to be considering life after the PhD, this programme is designed to provide you with information that you can use during your PhD so that you have the resources and experiences that you'll need at the end.

The programme for Reorientation comprises a series of sessions, some of which will run concurrently. The sessions on offer are:
• Building your Networks
• Using Reflection and Evaluation for Improving Teaching
• Applying for a Job
• Transferable Skills and the ePortfolio
• Publishing and Authorship

 

How to switch off

Date: 29 August 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: HMLT002, Hugh MacKenzie Lecture Theatre, Kelburn Campus

The good thing about academia is the flexibility. The terrible things about academia is the flexibility. You can be doing it anywhere – on the bus, at home, as you play with your kids. Your mind can be whizzing away planning the next thing or worrying about the last thing. It can be hard to switch off. But it’s a great skill to learn and you can learn to do it.
 
This workshop will:

  • Explain the difference between worry and problem-solving
  • Provide strategies for switching off
  • Learn how to bring your attention to what you are doing now
  • Help you to leave work at work

There will be 12 weeks of weekly follow-up emails because it takes a while to change a habit.

 

Time for Research

Date: 28 August 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: HMLT002, Hugh MacKenzie Lecture Theatre, Kelburn Campus

Do you feel like you never have enough time to get to your research, particularly the writing part? And that other things like administration, committees, emails, project management etc demand all your time? This workshop shows you how to guarantee you spend high quality time on your research outputs. It covers prioritising, goal setting and managing competing demands in a university context. If you want to increase your research output without compromising your work/life balance, then this workshop is for you. Key aspects of this workshop have featured in our article in the journal Nature.

This workshop will show you how to:
• take control of your time
• prioritise
• stop procrastinating and stay motivated
• avoid distractions
• say NO (and understand why it is so hard to do so)
• balance competing demands
• manage email and paperwork
• work the slightly less hard way
• think more realistically about your research productivity
• find time for writing

Write that Journal Article in 7 Days

Date: 24 July 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: Hunter Council Chamber (HU204), Hunter Building, Kelburn Campus

In this workshop we will look at a 'fast track' method for getting a journal article together from work you already have. We will explore some publishing strategies and do a series of exercises designed to help you give your article focus and touch on the tricky subject of sharing authorship. Lastly we will talk about some alternative writing techniques which may speed up the process of producing an article.

So you want to be an academic social media superstar

Date: 23 July 2013

Time: 2.00 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

In the last of this year’s ECR workshops, Inger Mewburn (aka The Thesis Whisperer) will present a pair of complimentary presentations: “Academic blogging for beginners” (2.00-2.55pm) and “How to tweet like a pro” (3.30-4.30pm). Registration entitles you to attend both sessions, and although you are welcome to attend one or the other, Inger notes that you will not get the full benefit from blogging without doing Twitter as well.

Academic blogging for beginners 

Have you thought about starting a blog, but are not sure where to begin? In this presentation Inger will talk about some of the barriers to blogging. She will take you through some of her recent research she has done with Pat Thomson on what academics tend to blog about and why. Throughout she will give you the benefit of her years of experience as a high profile blogger, specifically about building communities and sustaining your blog over time. There will be plenty of time for questions and discussion about how to build and grow successful academic blogs. 

How to Tweet like a Pro

Twitter is by far the best way to connect with other academics online, publicise your blog and learn about new developments in a whole range of fields. But the format of Twitter, particularly the way it seems to be in 'code' can be off putting. Some people worry that getting benefits from Twitter requires a large investment time. In this presentation Inger will demystify Twitter by showing you how to compose Tweets that deliver impact and draw in followers. There will be plenty of time for discussion and questions about setting up and maintaining a professional Twitter presence.

Effective Note Taking

Date: 23 July 2013

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Many of us have never been taught how to take notes effectively and efficiently, by the time you get to a research degree – or even beyond - inefficient note taking might be slowing your writing down significantly. In this session we will explore the connection between note taking, thinking critically about what you are reading and beginning the writing process. You will get a chance to try out a few different ways of taking notes which are designed to reduce the ‘transaction time’ of reading and produce crisp, thesis ready text. These techniques can speed up your writing process and help you develop a more confident scholarly voice. If you find yourself taking copious notes and then forgetting why they were important when it comes time to write your thesis, this workshop is for you.

 

Thesis Writing

Date: 18 July 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This session will provide an overview of the thesis-writing process, the relationship between its parts, and the different types of writing involved. It will also introduce a number of techniques and prompts to help keep your argument on track. Participants are encouraged to bring a 1-2 page sample of their writing to workshop.

Registration for this workshop has now closed as the course is full.

Taming MS Word

Date: 20 June 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: KK217 Cyber Common, Kirk Building, Kelburn Campus

You want to make your thesis look properly prepared as well as having properly prepared content. MS Word offers facilities that can help you to achieve this aim, but it is not always clear how to find and use them. This hands-on seminar shows you some simple ways to get better results from MS Word.

Registration for this workshop has now closed as the course is full.

Early Career Research - Communicating Your Research

Date: 5 June 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Led by: Sandra Grey, Rebecca Priestley, Rhian Salmon

Academics are often expected to communicate their research to a non-peer audience, but with little consideration of the who, what, why, or how. This workshop will explore key aspects to keep in mind when communicating with different audiences - such as the media, decision-makers, general public, schools, mainstream press and use of social media - as well as your role as the researcher -communicator in those efforts.

Sandra Grey is a social and political scientist, and activist, with significant experience engaging with the media and policy-makers. Rebecca Priestley writes a weekly column for The Listener, has written three popular science books, and is a keen user of twitter and blogs. Rhian Salmon has several years experience running public outreach events such as festivals, science cafes, expeditions, and programmes for schools. The workshop will be very active and participatory, and involve rotation between all three of these facilitators.

 

Early Career Researcher Funding

Date: 22 May 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: HMLT104, Hugh MacKenzie Lecture Theatre, Kelburn Campus

So much of available research funding in academia is now competitive, but competing for funding can be daunting for the uninitiated. In this workshop, targeted to the needs of early career academics and PhD students, experienced members of staff will be available to share their tips and answer questions, so that staff and students who are new to the process of applying for funding will be better equipped for success.

The first half of the workshop will comprise a panel discussion, featuring established academics from a range of disciplines. In the second half of the workshop, we will break into small groups organised by faculty, each of which will have a panel of experienced staff. These more focussed sessions will be largely question-driven. The groups will be:

• Victoria Business School and Faculty of Law
• Faculty of Science and Faculty of Engineering
• Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Education and Faculty of Architecture and Design

Please nominate which of the small groups you would like to join when you fill out the registration form. This information will help us to allocate rooms for these groups. You are not restricted to your home faculty; you should feel free to select whichever group is best suited to your research area

Editing

Date: 16 May 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This workshop will equip participants with effective strategies for editing their own transactional writing (theses, articles etc). Starting by considering the purpose of editing, the workshop will cover different levels of editing and strategies for editing, before culminating in an opportunity for students to apply some of the strategies to their own writing. Participants should bring a paragraph or two to edit and a can-do attitude.

Defeating Self Sabotage

Date: 9 May 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: GBLT4, Government Buildings, Pipitea Campus

Do you find that despite your best efforts to ‘work on your thesis’ or to get your research output going it just doesn’t seem to be happening? Does there always seem to be something more urgent, interesting or important to do? Perhaps you are self-sabotaging. If you think you procrastinate, are a perfectionist, don’t say no often enough, are disorganised or are always ‘busy’, this seminar will help you to understand why your thesis or research isn’t getting done and what you can do about it.

 

Ethics

Date: 18 April 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This session will identify some of the ethical dilemmas that arise in research with human participants. We will then examine some of the strategies we can use to ensure that our research is carried out in an ethical way. 

Research Questions

Date: 21 March 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: AM101, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

This workshop will assist you to think about research questions in ways that can improve the quality of your research at three levels: focusing the topic, conducting the research and establishing the significance of the findings. You will learn how to match ‘what’, ‘how’, and ‘why’ questions to their specific purposes and gain some ideas to counter common challenges in getting questions right. The workshop will include an illustrated exercise to help in formulating questions, with opportunity for you to try it out with your own topic.

 

Shameless self promotion

Date: 7 March 2013

Time: 9.00 am

Venue: MYLT220, Murphy Building, Kelburn Campus

It's tempting to think that if you are clever and work hard then people will notice and shower you with rewards. Tempting but probably not true. As well as being clever and working hard you also need to be able to promote yourself. In this workshop you will learn strategies for:

  • Letting people know about your achievements
  • Developing your at 30 second pitch
  • Taking responsibility – not waiting for it to happen
  • Putting your best side forward in promotions, grants, awards

And all this without having to become a used-car salesperson!

Preparing for the oral defence

Date: 28 February 2013

Time: 2.30 pm

At Victoria, each PhD student must defend his or her thesis orally as part of the examination process. This workshop is aimed at students nearing the end of their candidature who are interested in learning all about the PhD oral defence.

The workshop will consider:

  • how best to prepare for the defence
  • what you can expect from your examiners 
  • how you can effectively answer some of those difficult questions

This interactive workshop is designed to give you an overview of policy and expectations as well as provide opportunities for you to ask lots of questions. Our aim is to make you as confident and well prepared as possible for the oral defence.

Registration for this workshop has closed as the course is full.

 

Defeating Self Sabotage

Date: 15 November 2012

Time: 1.30 pm

Do you find that despite your best efforts to ‘work on your thesis’ or to get your research output going it just doesn’t seem to be happening? Does there always seem to be something more urgent, interesting or important to do? Perhaps you are self-sabotaging. If you think you procrastinate, are a perfectionist, don’t say no often enough, are disorganised or are always ‘busy’, this seminar will help you to understand why your thesis or research isn’t getting done and what you can do about it.

 

PhD Student Orientation

Date: 15–16 November 2012

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: AM106, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

A two day orientation for new PhD students.
 
 

Time Management for Researchers

Date: 15 November 2012

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: KKLT301, Kirk Building, Kelburn Campus

Do you feel like you never have enough time to do the things you need? And that you don’t have enough time to get involved in all the things you would like to do? And does it feel like others are always wasting your time? And after that, does it feel like you have hardly made any progress on your PhD or research? If so, then this might be the right course for you.

Managing Candidature - what's my role?

Date: 16 October 2012

Time: 1.00 pm

Venue: EALT206, Easterfield Building, Kelburn Campus

How do you take responsibility for managing this three to four year project (your PhD) that you have embarked on?  How do you make sure you get the most out of your relationship with your supervisor?

If you are in the first year of your candidature, this workshop will give you some tips and strategies for clarifying expectations and roles and developing learning plans.

What are examiners thinking when they examine your thesis?

Date: 15 October 2012

Time: 2.10 pm

Venue: EALT206, Easterfield Building, Kelburn Campus

How are examiners selected? What do examiners think and do during the examination process? How best do you prepare for examination?

This workshop will focus on the theory of the topic rather than the specific examination requirements at Victoria and is based on Dr Kiley’s research in the area of thesis examination.

 

Preparing for the Oral Defence

Date: 20 September 2012

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: AM103, Alan MacDiarmid Building, Kelburn Campus

Are you interested in learning all about the PhD oral defence? What are the expectations of you leading up to the defence? What can you expect from your examiners? How can you effectively answer some of those difficult questions?

This interactive workshop is designed to give you an overview of policy and expectations as well as provide opportunities for you to ask lots of questions. Our aim is to make you as confident and well prepared as possible for the oral defence.

Briefing for Chairs of PhD Oral Exams

Date: 19 June 2012

Time: 10.00 am

Venue: Room 632, Murphy Building (MY 632), Kelburn Campus

The FGR is establishing a pool of senior academic staff members holding the role of Associate Professor/Reader or Professor (not in an adjunct role) who are prepared to chair PhD oral examinations.

Orientation to Postgraduate Supervision at Victoria

Date: 14 June 2012

Time: 9.30 am

Venue: Room 632, Murphy Building (MY632), Kelburn Campus

The orientation day will cover the basics of PhD and Masters policy at Victoria University regarding postgraduate research supervision, the doctoral examination process and the practical support available at Victoria to support postgraduate research. The day is designed for those new to supervision and for experienced supervisors who are new to Victoria. Completing this day is a minimum requirement for all Victoria postgraduate research supervisors.

How to think like a statistician

Date: 17 May 2012

Time: 2.30 pm

Venue: RWW501, Railway West Wing, Pipitea Campus

In this workshop, we will discuss how to think statistically both at the planning stage and at the stage of data analysis. Participants are encouraged to talk about their research projects so we can all learn how research questions can be approached statistically.

 

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